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A whole different connotation

(27 Posts)
nanna8 Sat 03-Dec-22 00:08:45

I received a message from one of the ancestry sites asking who I would ‘root’ for - England, Wales or Scotland being of mixed ancestry. I did a double take because that means something a whole lot different here in Australia where I have lived for the past 50+ years! Set me thinking of how sometimes there can be misunderstandings between nations. A Moslem friend mentioned it was rude to sit with crossed legs and feet pointing outwards which I hadn’t known. Funny old world.

biglouis Sat 03-Dec-22 01:12:41

In some oriental countries it is deemed very rude to pat children on the head, This is because the head is considered to be the soul of the person and touching it casually is disrespectful. Whereas in the West patting a child's head is a sign of affaction or approval.

When you attend a Moslem household and eat with your fingers from a common dish (as eating couscous in Morocco) it is considered very rude to use the left hand. This is often the hand which people in that country use to clean themselves in the toilet so one does nto touch food with it. Westerners are usually given a spoon!

AussieGran59 Sat 03-Dec-22 02:02:08

Hi nanna8, yes it’s a funny old world. When in Cornwall I told our Cornish friends that my husband always wears thongs at home. They were very confused. Then I remembered they are called flip flops in the UK and the British meaning of a thong is completely different. And no, he wouldn’t wear one of those!

nanna8 Sat 03-Dec-22 05:53:07

Haha AussieGran, your friends must have thought you were extremely broad minded !

M0nica Sat 03-Dec-22 06:52:19

Some years ago we had to ween an Australian work colleague of asking for some Durex, when she meant sellotape or sticky tape.

NotSpaghetti Sat 03-Dec-22 07:26:57

And a "rubber" of course can be awkward in the office...

AussieGran59 Sat 03-Dec-22 07:28:51

MOnica, I haven’t heard it called durex. I always say sellotape.
I cringed when in the UK and we passed a “gastro pub” as here gastro means vomiting and diarrhoea bug! I know in medical terminology gastro means stomach but I still hate those two words used to describe an eating place.

Sparklefizz Sat 03-Dec-22 07:29:10

M0nica

Some years ago we had to ween an Australian work colleague of asking for some Durex, when she meant sellotape or sticky tape.

I remember Jasper Carrot (remember him?) doing a joke about that years ago.

Oopsadaisy1 Sat 03-Dec-22 09:01:57

Our American boss told us that he had just patted his Granddaughter on her Fanny to stop her doing something naughty. She also wore a ‘Fanny bag’.

We were too shocked to snigger until we realised what he meant.

Bum - it’s called a Bum!! Of course to him a Bum was a tramp….. and just try asking him for a rubber……

GrandmaKT Sat 03-Dec-22 09:08:59

I have to ask, nann88, what does 'root for' mean in Aus (if you can explain it without getting too graphic!). We're with family in NZ at the moment and I wouldn't want to make a faux pas! I know all about 'gastro' as the gc and their friends seem to come down with it constantly!

GrandmaKT Sat 03-Dec-22 09:10:02

Sorry nanna8, my keyboard added an extra 8!

Witzend Sat 03-Dec-22 09:26:51

Oopsadaisy1

Our American boss told us that he had just patted his Granddaughter on her Fanny to stop her doing something naughty. She also wore a ‘Fanny bag’.

We were too shocked to snigger until we realised what he meant.

Bum - it’s called a Bum!! Of course to him a Bum was a tramp….. and just try asking him for a rubber……

I’ve seen that in a novel - ‘He patted her fanny as he went past’ 😱
Whoever was supposed to edit/translate it from the American evidently missed that bit!

Blossoming Sat 03-Dec-22 09:34:33

I first came across the American use of the word fanny in an American motorbike magazine I used to buy. I laughed so hard at the description of a motorbike seat as “easy on your fanny”.

SueDonim Sat 03-Dec-22 12:46:22

We once had dinner with some very well-to-do Americans. At the end of the meal the hostess said ‘Shall we go and sit in the comfortable chairs? I’ve got fanny-ache from sitting here so long!’

My Dh nearly fell off his own chair! 🤣🤣

MissAdventure Sat 03-Dec-22 12:52:15

grin
Mickey Flanagan has had a field day with asking an American woman if he could come in her house.
(But you probably need a rough accent like mine to appreciate it)

M0nica Sat 03-Dec-22 14:44:24

In France, a bar in a nearby town is called 'The Fanny Bar'

MissAdventure Sat 03-Dec-22 14:50:31

Hope its warm and welcoming. smile

Georgesgran Sat 03-Dec-22 16:31:40

In lockdown, someone sent me a clip of two men listening to an American lady talking about caulk and caulking. Her pronunciation was a little off, with caulk, sounding more like cock! Totally non-PC, but funny at the time.

JackyB Sat 03-Dec-22 22:20:19

GrandmaKT

I have to ask, nann88, what does 'root for' mean in Aus (if you can explain it without getting too graphic!). We're with family in NZ at the moment and I wouldn't want to make a faux pas! I know all about 'gastro' as the gc and their friends seem to come down with it constantly!

Yes - please do tell!

grannydarkhair Sat 03-Dec-22 23:11:47

Scene from The Big Bang Theory which plays on different connotations 😁

youtu.be/KJyaDLKzJvo

Ro60 Sat 03-Dec-22 23:38:17

Funny Old World indeed!

Here in the UK - when I was a child it was considered inappropriate to show your midriff yet ladies in saris often would, but would never dream of showing their legs - or chest.

Ali08 Sun 04-Dec-22 13:44:41

That would also explain why the Queen etc, when crossing their legs, point their toes sideways. Apart from it being comfortable.
A friend moved to America when we were at school, and asked someone across the table to pass the rubber, which got her some strange looks!
And Blossoming, that was hilarious!! 🤣🤣🤣🤣

Ali08 Sun 04-Dec-22 13:46:14

Georgesgran

In lockdown, someone sent me a clip of two men listening to an American lady talking about caulk and caulking. Her pronunciation was a little off, with caulk, sounding more like cock! Totally non-PC, but funny at the time.

There's an advert on YouTube of, if I remember right, a man from New Zealand talking about decking you might enjoy.

Ali08 Sun 04-Dec-22 13:47:16

'New Zealand decking advert' if you want a laugh

grandtanteJE65 Sun 04-Dec-22 14:05:32

Generally speaking both amongst traditionally brought up Muslims and Orthodox Jews it is considered rude to look directly at the person you are talking to, if that person is either of the opposite sex, or older than you are, or your social superior.

Chinese and Japanese tend to adhere to this rule as well.

It is, of course, the direct opposite of the good manners of the Western world that require you to look at the person you are speaking to, or who is speaking to you.

Hands out of your pockets- rule is another one. In the far East it is rude to display your hands more than necessary, so wearing a kimono, you tuck your hands into your sleeves.

Nowhere in the East is it considered correct for young or younger men to smoke in the presence of their elders.

And our generation of Europeans were taught it was rude for a child to sit down without permission if grown-ups were standing. We had too, to rise if an adult came into the room both at home and at school.

In Denmark, I had to remember as a child to curtsey to grown-ups when greeting them or saying good-bye and not to extend my hand for a hand-shake until the grown-up put out his or her hand. If the grown-up you were with in the street or a shop stopped to talk to a friend, the accompanying child curtsied (or bowed, if a boy).

Just back from holiday, I automatically did so in Glasgow and people stared as if I was crazy, or worse, taking the mickey!

Today's children frankly disbelieve us when we tell them this.