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Coronavirus

Time to admit this virus affects some more than others.

(93 Posts)
trisher Fri 27-Nov-20 13:41:21

Current government attitudes on Covid present as"we are all in this together" but in fact there are huge inequalities in the figures, for all sorts of things, including deaths and long term health problems. Black people, men and women from poorer backgrounds suffer most www.health.org.uk/news-and-comment/blogs/inequalities-and-deaths-involving-covid-19
Isn't it time we admitted this is partly a result of a policy of not supporting the poor and we committed to stamping out inequality?

GagaJo Fri 27-Nov-20 13:59:38

Couldn't agree more trisher. It's a very unequal world we live in.

Smileless2012 Fri 27-Nov-20 13:59:58

I don't think the "we are all in this together" rhetoric means that the inequalities in society are being overlooked or deliberately ignored.

For me, it's a reminder that we all need to stick to the guidelines which from the very beginning some have not been prepared to do.

biba70 Fri 27-Nov-20 14:02:31

Totally agree.

Nanof3 Fri 27-Nov-20 14:10:30

Folk with Obesity, Diabetes, Auto immune conditions etc make them more vulnerable, unfortunately these are more common in some ethnic groups.

Alegrias2 Fri 27-Nov-20 14:11:21

trisher we may disagree about some things but I firmly agree with you here. I heard somebody say on the radio, We're all in the same storm together but some of us have better boats. Summed it up for me.

Anniebach Fri 27-Nov-20 14:11:53

Agree Smileless

suziewoozie Fri 27-Nov-20 14:13:22

The thing is it’s much easier for some people to follow the rules than for others - and that’s not just about attitude but about for example, the physical environment you live in - space, garden etc. Also your physical work environment, is your workplace Covid compliant, can you wfh. Can you afford to self isolate? Many of these are deeply rooted in socioeconomic differences.

Smileless2012 Fri 27-Nov-20 14:28:01

I agree suziewoozie but as we have seen, there are those who have refused to follow the rules and continue to do so which has nothing to do with socioeconomic differences.

trisher Fri 27-Nov-20 14:29:55

Exactly suziewoozie. I was talking about this to someone who is a governor in schools in a severely deprived area, the number of times chldren are being sent home is much higher in her schools than in better areas. As she said parents workng in low pay jobs, overcrowding, poor diet all sorts of factors which mean the virus is spread more and causes more damage.

suziewoozie Fri 27-Nov-20 14:37:46

Yes trisher exactly. What Covid has exposed and exacerbated - not caused- is the deep, pre-existing fault lines of inequality and deprivation that run deep throughout our society. I’m not arrogant enough to think that ‘I’m in it together ‘ with the redundant workers relying on a food bank whilst waiting for UC and living in overcrowded homes with no outside space.

Antonia Fri 27-Nov-20 14:45:21

I don't think it's quite as simple as looking at inequalities, although I agree that this needs to be done. The virus attacks some people more severely than others, and the reasons are not completely understood yet. Some people in their forties have died, even with no underlying health issues, and some have long Covid. I don't think diabetes (especially type 1) and auto immune diseases are more prevalent in some ethnic groups. They happen in all groups of society.
It's true that poor living and working conditions favour the spread of the virus, and these ought to be a priority for the government to tackle. I doubt if they will be though.
'We're all in it together' means that it falls on all of us to do what we can to get the virus under control.

EllanVannin Fri 27-Nov-20 14:53:37

I've always banged on about the inequality in this country, it's appalling.

EllanVannin Fri 27-Nov-20 14:59:52

If all people could afford the best food there'd be far fewer ills and a better resistance against serious illness.

allium Fri 27-Nov-20 15:00:43

I think you make a very good point Trisher.

suziewoozie Fri 27-Nov-20 15:11:47

Antonia

I don't think it's quite as simple as looking at inequalities, although I agree that this needs to be done. The virus attacks some people more severely than others, and the reasons are not completely understood yet. Some people in their forties have died, even with no underlying health issues, and some have long Covid. I don't think diabetes (especially type 1) and auto immune diseases are more prevalent in some ethnic groups. They happen in all groups of society.
It's true that poor living and working conditions favour the spread of the virus, and these ought to be a priority for the government to tackle. I doubt if they will be though.
'We're all in it together' means that it falls on all of us to do what we can to get the virus under control.

But many health conditions are related to inequalities and there is also an enormous body of research that shows access to and use of health services is related to socio economic status for a whole variety of reasons. On simple example is time off work for a medical appointment or treatment. It doesn’t matter what your ‘rights’ are if you’re in a precarious poorly paid job. All in it together is I think a very anodyne meaningless cliche when set against the reality of exactly what ‘it’ is we are all in together.

MayBee70 Fri 27-Nov-20 15:18:31

We were speaking to someone last night about infection rates in our area and it turns out it’s mainly in the old mining towns where unemployment is still high.

maddyone Fri 27-Nov-20 15:19:32

Whilst all the above is true, the biggest indicator is age.

suziewoozie Fri 27-Nov-20 15:22:54

maddyone

Whilst all the above is true, the biggest indicator is age.

You are quite right 😀

lemongrove Fri 27-Nov-20 15:32:29

Age and existing health conditions ( and no, not always caused by inequality) are the biggest causes of illness and death from Covid.
The phrase ‘all in this together’ is obviously to make people realise that unless everyone tries hard to follow the rules and guidelines we won’t get on top of it.

growstuff Fri 27-Nov-20 15:34:21

Nothing can be done about a person's age. However, there is something which can be done to support people financially, so that they don't feel they have to work when infected. It should even be possible to provide them with accommodation, if that's difficult at home. People with conditions such as diabetes shouldn't have to feel that they have to work in risky environments.

An 80 year old living on his/her own or with just a partner - or even in a care home - is safer than somebody who lives in a multi-generation home, where others go out to work or school.

growstuff Fri 27-Nov-20 15:38:45

lemongrove

Age and existing health conditions ( and no, not always caused by inequality) are the biggest causes of illness and death from Covid.
The phrase ‘all in this together’ is obviously to make people realise that unless everyone tries hard to follow the rules and guidelines we won’t get on top of it.

I agree that health conditions aren't always the result of inequality, but it is a a fact that people living in deprivation have worse health outcomes than others and are more likely to have the pre-existing health conditions which put them at higher risk of dying. They're more likely to be infected in the first place.

growstuff Fri 27-Nov-20 15:39:58

People from certain ethnic groups (eg Indian subcontinent) are more likely to have T2 diabetes.

trisher Fri 27-Nov-20 15:40:02

If you are interested there is a Webinar on Tues 15th Dec, discussing how things might be changed-"Build Back fairer" www.health.org.uk/build-back-fairer-webinar

suziewoozie Fri 27-Nov-20 15:45:34

lemongrove

Age and existing health conditions ( and no, not always caused by inequality) are the biggest causes of illness and death from Covid.
The phrase ‘all in this together’ is obviously to make people realise that unless everyone tries hard to follow the rules and guidelines we won’t get on top of it.

It’s a rubbish meaningless cliche - if a govt wants to help people follow the rules they could start with improving income when self isolating and longer term improve housing ( in time for the next pandemic)