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Coronavirus

Long Covid

(21 Posts)
MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 09:19:25

Apparently almost a third of recovered Covid patients could end up back in hospital within five months and one in eight will die of related conditions, alarming new figures have shown.

Research by the University of Leicester and the Office for National Statistics has found there was a devastating long-term toll on survivors of severe coronavirus, with many developing heart problems, diabetes and chronic liver and kidney conditions.

Out of 47,780 people who were discharged from hospital in the first wave, 29.4 per cent were readmitted to hospital within 140 days, and 12.3 per cent of the total died. The current cut-off point for recording Covid deaths is 28 days after a positive test, so it may mean thousands more people should be included in the coronavirus death statistics.
Kamlesh Khunti, the study author and professor of primary care diabetes and vascular medicine at the university, said: “People seem to be going home, getting long-term effects, coming back in and dying. We see nearly 30 per cent who are readmitted, and that’s a lot of people. The numbers are so large The message here is we really need to prepare for long Covid. It’s a mammoth task to follow up these patients and the NHS is really pushed at the moment, but some sort of monitoring needs to be arranged. “

Wondering if anybody has personal experience or among family and friends of the long term effects?

FannyCornforth Mon 18-Jan-21 09:21:16

Yes. I'm pretty certain that DH has it sad

FannyCornforth Mon 18-Jan-21 09:22:19

I might have to hide this thread though.

Alegrias1 Mon 18-Jan-21 09:31:45

Fanny don't hide this thread!

This is a study that has not been peer reviewed. The numbers quoted above do not give comparisons with the number of people in the general population who get admitted to hospital without having COVID in the first place so quoting the figures this way is unreliable.

12.3% died? It doesn't say what they died of.

This may well be from a serious study but the numbers being quoted are unreliable until the final results are known.

The extract is from the Daily Mail. Just saying.....

growstuff Mon 18-Jan-21 09:46:49

I did know that it was suspected that a number of people have developed diabetes as a result of covid, in addition to diabetes being a risk factor for covid.

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 09:48:27

The extract is from the Daily Mail. Just saying
Just wrong, DT actually and the study is by a professor of Primary Care medicine and Diabetes at the University of Leicester.

As to causes of death? The suggestion is of heart, liver and kidney conditions and an increase in the incidence of diabetes.

(I don’t read the DM)

FannyCornforth Mon 18-Jan-21 09:49:48

Thank you Alegrias.
I may have to remove the article from his copy of the DM (blush) before he sees it! smile

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 09:50:48

www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjVudyJmqXuAhXmShUIHX75AqMQFjAAegQIAhAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ons.gov.uk%2Fnews%2Fstatementsandletters%2Ftheprevalenceoflongcovidsymptomsandcovid19complications&usg=AOvVaw2i4kwZlxgugSL2fL3px3Q8

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 09:56:28

Why so dismissive?
Do you know something about this that the ONS doesn’t?
Just to add to what Growstuff has said about diabetes
Prof Khunti said it was important to make sure people were placed on protective therapies, “We don’t know if it’s because Covid destroyed the beta cells which make insulin and you get type 1 diabetes, or whether it causes insulin resistance, and you develop type 2, but we are seeing these surprising new diagnoses of diabetes,” he added

He might just have an inkling as to what he is talking about and the ONS is surely a reputable enough agency? .

Alegrias1 Mon 18-Jan-21 10:01:18

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9158125/Covid-UK-Mass-testing-regions-bring-cycle-lockdowns-end-spring.html

Just towards the end of the article. I noticed they've added a comment about this not being peer reviewed, maybe they read my post. grin

The Mail and the Telegraph (and all the others) will report the results in a way that gets them clicks or sales. Debunking what they say is not the same as dismissing the research.

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 10:05:48

Debunking what they say is not the same as dismissing the research
No, just debunking /dismissing another member’s post hmm.
(No greater insult than to suggest something is from the DM. I could almost be tempted to buy a hamster to line its cage with the aforementioned publication )

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 10:07:36

However - be that as it may, my question is (still):

Has anybody personal experience or among family and friends of long term effects.

Alegrias1 Mon 18-Jan-21 10:10:36

But it was from the DM.... confused. And I am questioning what they said, not your right to post it. That's still allowed?

And yes, I'm interested to hear others experiences too.

BigBertha1 Mon 18-Jan-21 10:13:04

No Maw B I haven't thankfully if you know what I mean. I can quite see that their may be sequalae in large numbers of people looking at the way the virus works. I just hope the NHS and Government are planning for it

growstuff Mon 18-Jan-21 10:13:04

MawBe

Why so dismissive?
Do you know something about this that the ONS doesn’t?
Just to add to what Growstuff has said about diabetes
Prof Khunti said it was important to make sure people were placed on protective therapies, “We don’t know if it’s because Covid destroyed the beta cells which make insulin and you get type 1 diabetes, or whether it causes insulin resistance, and you develop type 2, but we are seeing these surprising new diagnoses of diabetes,” he added

He might just have an inkling as to what he is talking about and the ONS is surely a reputable enough agency? .

My daughter's partner is involved in researching this. His specialty is diabetes, but at the moment all his time is taken up with investigating links with Covid. That's how I knew - not from the media. As far as I know, nothing has been published yet, but it's looking highly likely that Covid can cause diabetes. If it does, the NHS needs to be prepared - and resourced.

MawBe Mon 18-Jan-21 10:31:28

Let’s not split hairs.
It may well have been in the DM, presumably that is where you read it but as I don’t, my quote was from the Telegraph and for all I know it may be in the Times as well - I haven’t got there yet.

growstuff Mon 18-Jan-21 10:39:53

From The Lancet, October 2020:

As the global COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, it has also become clear that the interplay between COVID-19 and diabetes entails a complex pathophysiology. Not only are COVID-19 outcomes more severe in people with diabetes and metabolic dysfunction, but recent data also suggest that COVID-19 could precipitate acute metabolic complications of diabetes, such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycaemia. The mechanisms underlying these links remain unclear, but are likely to involve the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, a binding site for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is expressed in key metabolic organs, such as the pancreas, and in β cells in particular. Potentially, the SARS-CoV-2 tropism for β cells could lead to cell damage and an impairment in insulin secretion, triggering hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis.

It has also been postulated that SARS-CoV-2 exposure can precipitate type 1 diabetes onset. Data collected between March and June, 2020, from five paediatric inpatient units from four National Health Service Trusts in London, UK, indicate an increase in the number of new type 1 diabetes cases in children compared with a typical year, although causality cannot be established at this stage. Important information is likely to emerge from much larger and comprehensive datasets. To this end, in June, 2020, an international group of diabetes experts announced the launch of CoviDIAB, a global registry of COVID-19-related diabetes. This registry aims to investigate the extent and pathogenesis of new-onset diabetes and metabolic dysfunction in pre-existing patients with diabetes to help uncover novel mechanisms of disease and define the best interventions.

www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(20)30315-6/fulltext

Urmstongran Mon 18-Jan-21 11:08:27

Our youngest daughter aged 40y (no underlying conditions) is back to full time teaching after 9 weeks sick leave from long Covid. She is still tired (says it comes with the territory).

As is a new virus she said that during her sick leave her anxiety levels spiked if she woke in the wee small hours, worrying ‘what could this virus be doing to my internal organs?’.

She said some days it was easy to disappear down a rabbit hole of ‘what ifs’. I can only imagine the anxiety it can and thankfully now, only very occasionally in her case, does generate.

Shinamae Mon 18-Jan-21 11:11:40

I started a thread about this recently as I have had Covid and have been left with aching legs and I’m not sure whether that is Covid related. A few months ago I was told that I was pre-diabetic so I will have another blood test and see how that’s going 🥴

Casdon Mon 18-Jan-21 11:12:33

Hopefully some of the doubters will change their minds as a result of this research once/if it’s validated, because surely it becomes a no-brained to be vaccinated if it is proven?

growstuff Mon 18-Jan-21 11:20:23

Urmstongran Has she had blood tests to make sure her kidneys and liver are functioning normally and that she hasn't developed diabetes?