Gransnet forums

Coronavirus

Italy insist on all medical staff must be vaccinated.

(41 Posts)
mokryna Sat 10-Apr-21 19:17:31

Italy insist on all medical staff must be vaccinated. If they refuse they are to be sent home without any pay. Do you think this should happen in every country?

Galaxy Sat 10-Apr-21 19:18:10

No.

BlueSky Sat 10-Apr-21 21:19:07

Makes sense. I read that medical staff who refuse will be transferred to duties not likely to spread infection.

Amberone Sat 10-Apr-21 21:25:39

Don't think so, but certainly should be regularly tested.

I'm not sure what the current evidence is that vaccinations stop you spreading Covid. I remember reading somewhere that it may reduce transmission, I think. Anyone know??

EkwaNimitee Sat 10-Apr-21 21:32:41

More research is needed before we go down the mandatory route

suziewoozie Sat 10-Apr-21 21:47:54

Another no here. That’s not the way to solve the problem. Re reduction in transmission, I haven’t seen any figures recently but the last ones I saw said the reduction was about 70%

YorkLady Sat 10-Apr-21 21:51:40

Are medical staff routinely tested now? I thought that it was weekly but I can’t find any evidence of this. Anyone know?

Esspee Sat 10-Apr-21 22:11:01

When you are ill you need to be protected. I wouldn’t have any issues with vaccination being made essential for staff in hospitals.

Casdon Sat 10-Apr-21 22:11:25

It’s related to all front line healthcare staff, not just doctors. If anybody’s interested, here’s a good article explaining the situation in Italy.
www.nytimes.com/2021/03/31/world/europe/italy-covid-vaccines-health-workers.html
The not vaccinated rate is very similar to healthcare staff in the UK. I’m sure we are already seeing similar scenarios in the UK, and I do think all frontline NHS staff should be vaccinated or move to a non patient facing role unless they have an overriding medical reason which precludes vaccination.

maddyone Sat 10-Apr-21 23:04:21

I don’t think people should be forced to get vaccinated, I just wish people would understand the need to be vaccinated.

B9exchange Sun 11-Apr-21 00:19:43

If you choose to work in a role caring for sick or vulnerable people you will have to have a hepatitis B jab. No jab, no job, your choice. I can't see any difference with the covid jab. Not mandatory for anyone else, but in those roles, yes.

Nanof3 Sun 11-Apr-21 08:44:39

Unless there is a very good reason e.g pregnancy I think all healthcare workers should have the jab, a carer who looks after my stepmother aged 89 and her daughter who works in a care home have both refused, it makes me worried and angry.

Lovetopaint037 Sun 11-Apr-21 09:00:41

Yes. I think they should. Would you like someone you loved looking after someone who didn’t believe in vaccination.

sodapop Sun 11-Apr-21 09:36:47

I agree B9 I think its early days yet and as time goes on there will be better treatments,vaccines etc. I'm not generally a fan of government mandates but at the moment we have to do what we can. My daughter is a community nurse and had her vaccination a good while ago.

BlueSky Sun 11-Apr-21 09:42:26

Agree Sodapop we are in an exceptional situation.

Polarbear2 Sun 11-Apr-21 09:42:50

Yes. (Where I worked) All nurses, doctors and associated health care professionals had to have a range of vaccinations in order to get a contract. Just add this one on. No drama.

suziewoozie Sun 11-Apr-21 09:54:25

Polarbear2

Yes. (Where I worked) All nurses, doctors and associated health care professionals had to have a range of vaccinations in order to get a contract. Just add this one on. No drama.

It’s a different issue making vaccines a pre-employment condition rather than a post employment one. There are important legal issues here for one thing

Grannynannywanny Sun 11-Apr-21 10:08:03

In recent weeks I have been allowed indoor care home visits with a loved one after a year of window visits.

I’ve been vaccinated. On arrival, I have a covid test and wait 30 mins for result. Then I’m dressed in PPE for our 30 min timed visit. Despite my vaccination, covid test and PPE we have to sit 2 metres apart for our visit.

For the rest of the day he will be cared for by staff who work 12 hour shifts in very close proximity to residents and some of them may well be unvaccinated by choice. If they are, then surely care home residents are more at risk from them than visiting next of kin?

Polarbear2 Sun 11-Apr-21 10:09:58

I respect your point and I’m sure you’re better informed than I am but - I disagree. If you want to continue a front line job, and there’s no medical reason you can’t have the jab, then it should be mandatory. 3 months consultation period. Suitable alternative employment offered. I’d guess an absolute tiny minority would stand firm.

Galaxy Sun 11-Apr-21 10:15:49

And oresymbably people shouldn't be able to receive care if they dont want to be vaccinated.

Galaxy Sun 11-Apr-21 10:16:44

hmmpresumably that should say.

suziewoozie Sun 11-Apr-21 10:17:05

Polarbear2

I respect your point and I’m sure you’re better informed than I am but - I disagree. If you want to continue a front line job, and there’s no medical reason you can’t have the jab, then it should be mandatory. 3 months consultation period. Suitable alternative employment offered. I’d guess an absolute tiny minority would stand firm.

It simply can’t be done like this legally no matter what you would prefer. My position is that individuals who are vaccine hesitant have to be dealt with on an individual basis with respect for their autonomy being the starting point of the discussion. Then we could see how much of a problem remains. We’ve also got to avoid falling into the trap that being vaccinated = unable to transmit virus. Proper infection control including meticulous use of appropriate PPE remains essential.

Polarbear2 Sun 11-Apr-21 10:20:31

Cool. Yeah I get that 👍

suziewoozie Sun 11-Apr-21 10:30:48

Polarbear2

Cool. Yeah I get that 👍

I actually feel a bit guilty about health and care workers as well which explains why I think we should treat the vaccine hesitant with respect in trying to encourage them to get vaccinated. Many - social care workers, health care assistants etc- are on minimum wages or thereabouts and a year ago many were having to work with totally inadequate PPE. Additionally many worked far above and beyond what we had any right to expect to care for us all. I just think we should remember all that when we are discussing how to handle the problem.
As for Italy, I don’t expect that hardline to work

Galaxy Sun 11-Apr-21 10:37:50

I would also imagine it's one of the least productive ways to deal with the issue, I dont know if Italy has the same issues with retention and recruitment of care staff as we do, and there is also the issue of bodily autonomy and the impact these decisions will have on other aspects of healthcare. It is not a decision to be taken quickly or without a thorough understanding of the implications.