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Coronavirus

Proof of the power of vaccination

(87 Posts)
Casdon Wed 12-May-21 17:57:17

I’ve just seen this in the news about a huge surge in COVID cases of the Indian variant in Bolton. The fact that the cases are surging in the under 25s must give the nervous amongst us comfort that vaccination is working. We just need the under 25s to be vaccinated as soon as possible too.
www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-57075618

PamelaJ1 Wed 12-May-21 18:01:30

Happy that the vaccine works.
Not too happy to hear the Indian variant is over here.

GrannyGravy13 Wed 12-May-21 18:53:21

The Indian authorities are confident that the current available vaccines in India are effective against the Indian Variant

toscalily Wed 12-May-21 18:58:43

This from the BBC article "This spike is related to international travel, particularly with people returning to Bolton from India".

We are only now coming out of the Lockdown restrictions, with most of us not having ventured to the next town/county let alone travelling to another continent therefore why is it considered acceptable for the asian community to flout these rules and travel internationally?

MayBee70 Wed 12-May-21 19:00:33

They do work but are probably slightly less efficacious and more transmissible. Which means that herd immunity is being pushed further away. It only takes a variant that doesn’t respond to vaccination and we’re back to square one which is why hands face space ventilate is still important. There has been an outbreak amongst people sitting outside a pub in Tyneside I believe.

MissChateline Wed 12-May-21 19:04:44

Just sing happy birthday twice a few times a day and we will all be OK .

MayBee70 Wed 12-May-21 19:09:57

I’d like someone to tell me in which ways we’ve been proactive in eliminating this virus other than vaccinating? And what things we could be doing now but aren’t. The infection rate has now plateaued, it isn’t going down the way that everyone seems to think it has.

GrannyGravy13 Wed 12-May-21 19:17:20

It’s a virus that is here to stay, like many others. We (the world) has to live alongside it.

The world cannot totally shut down for a given amount of time, it needs power, food, medics, managing it is all we can do. Influenza, nova virus even the common cold kill, I am more worried about the Cancer time bomb about to explode along with all the other things that have been put on hold to save the NHS

MayBee70 Wed 12-May-21 19:28:53

And how many cancer patients would have caught covid in hospital and nursing homes because of government incompetence?

Alegrias1 Wed 12-May-21 19:31:19

Thanks Casdon for trying to present some good news. 🤣

The vaccine is working in the population to which it has been given. It works against the "Indian" variant. Yes, the virus might behave as no virus has even done before and magically morph into a vaccine-resistant variant overnight.

And we might get hit by a meteor.

GrannyGravy13 Wed 12-May-21 19:36:57

Blimey I agree with you Alegrias1

Alegrias1 Wed 12-May-21 19:37:36

Put out the flags GG13!

Whitewavemark2 Wed 12-May-21 19:55:30

I’ve noticed an upward trend in my area, albeit it at a low level but up to about a fortnight ago it was down week on week for a long time. Last week it was 20 more than the previous week and this week 53 more than last week.

Bugger

Jaxjacky Wed 12-May-21 20:27:50

I think I may have three drinks in our local instead of two next Monday after reading this thread. 🙂

Baggs Wed 12-May-21 21:12:00

Why do news media keep publishing case numbers? It's numbers of hospitalisations and deaths that are important. If cases rise but those other two numbers do not, what's the problem?

Also, why is government blamed when people catch covid in hospital? Are MRSA and other nosocomial infections government's fault as well?

GrannyGravy13 Wed 12-May-21 21:13:39

Agree Baggs

MayBee70 Wed 12-May-21 21:21:52

Alegrias1

Thanks Casdon for trying to present some good news. 🤣

The vaccine is working in the population to which it has been given. It works against the "Indian" variant. Yes, the virus might behave as no virus has even done before and magically morph into a vaccine-resistant variant overnight.

And we might get hit by a meteor.

imo during a pandemic it’s best to hope for the best but plan for the worst and not assume anything.

Casdon Wed 12-May-21 21:28:20

Case numbers are very important Baggs because that’s the only way we know how much COVID is in our area. and can act accordingly. Case rates have been a predictor of hospitalisation and death rates until vaccinations were given, which was the point I was trying to make when I posted this news.

No mention is made of the government being blamed for hospital transmission in the article, unless I’ve gone word blind?

Whitewavemark2 Wed 12-May-21 21:31:04

Baggs

Why do news media keep publishing case numbers? It's numbers of hospitalisations and deaths that are important. If cases rise but those other two numbers do not, what's the problem?

Also, why is government blamed when people catch covid in hospital? Are MRSA and other nosocomial infections government's fault as well?

I wasn’t quoting from the media. I was quoting from the Zoe data that I having taking part in since last May.

Always assuming that in the very unlikely case the rising numbers do not result in rising deaths, long covid is always an issue.

Rising numbers albeit at a very low level should never be dismissed in such an offhand manner.

Lin52 Wed 12-May-21 21:39:00

Totally agree with you, but can you imagine the shouts of racism from that community if we, as we should have, stopped flights. Straight away.

Alegrias1 Wed 12-May-21 21:48:31

MayBee70

Alegrias1

Thanks Casdon for trying to present some good news. 🤣

The vaccine is working in the population to which it has been given. It works against the "Indian" variant. Yes, the virus might behave as no virus has even done before and magically morph into a vaccine-resistant variant overnight.

And we might get hit by a meteor.

imo during a pandemic it’s best to hope for the best but plan for the worst and not assume anything.

While this is of course true, it is also necessary to appreciate that there is light at the end of the tunnel. We can spend the next few months or years anticipating the worst at all times, and disregarding everything that suggests any progress whatsoever. Or we can understand that there are scientific facts that shows we are making progress against the virus and what the real risks are.

Being realistic means understanding the positives and not always fearing the absolute worst. It's not irresponsible to believe we are winning.

Whitewavemark2 Wed 12-May-21 22:05:56

Yes I do agree alagrias

But being annoyed at blips is a human reaction, each number is a human being suffering.

That isn’t to say that I fear the worst, but that I am thrilled at the difference the vaccine is appearing to make. These skirmishes are undoubtedly just that but it does no harm to take note and adjust behaviour accordingly if thought necessary.,

Skydancer Wed 12-May-21 22:13:55

Lin52 of course flights should have been stopped especially to India. I agree - always harping on about racism get on my nerves. It's hardly relevant when all countries are fighting a common enemy, the virus.

Whitewavemark2 Thu 13-May-21 09:12:48

Professor Christina Pagel - UCL - director of clinical operational research and member of SAGE has written a long article with attached data supporting her call for a delay in the next stage of the road map.

It can be found on twitter and in the Guardian.

Alegrias1 Thu 13-May-21 09:21:51

Prof Pagel is not a member of SAGE, and she is speaking in a personal capacity. Independent SAGE is not an advisor to the Government and are not accountable for the outcomes of their opinions.

Not saying she's wrong but this must be taken in context.