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Dieting & exercise

What is safe exercise with heart condition?

(33 Posts)
Ramblingrose22 Wed 27-Oct-21 12:29:18

I was recently diagnosed with narrowed coronary arteries after a breathless episode. One artery is 50 -60 per cent blocked.

Does anyone who has had the same diagnosis or maybe a heart attack know how to start exercising again safely, please?

Whiff Wed 27-Oct-21 12:32:29

I haven't got that but found out last year I was born with a heart defect. Few months ago diagnosed with AF plus I have a neurological condition with effects my limbs.

But I go to an exercise class. I wrote about it on another thread. Will look and see which one. But at the AF clinic they where happy for me to exercise and my cardiologist was to.

Whiff Wed 27-Oct-21 12:35:15

Ramblingrose just looked it's on the first page of Does anyone have experience of personal trainer. If you want to know more about my class will gladly tell you.

Ramblingrose22 Wed 27-Oct-21 12:44:54

Thanks, Whiff. Will take a look later.

Am worried about over taxing the heart and risking a full blown heart attack.

Elegran Wed 27-Oct-21 12:53:20

Why not ask whoever diagnosed it? Every case is different, and they have more detailed knowledge of your diagnosis than anyone else. There is probably a sheet of advice that they can give you.

wildswan16 Wed 27-Oct-21 13:50:59

You need to ask your GP/Consultant. What is safe for you might not be the same as somebody else.

Many people with heart trouble are fearful of exercise thinking it might make things worse - that is hardly every true of course. Also, try contacting the BHF (British Heart Foundation) for advice on all things heart related.

Esspee Wed 27-Oct-21 13:55:08

People I have known recovering from a heart attack all made a point of walking every day. Just as far as felt comfortable and gradually walking farther every day.

Jane43 Wed 27-Oct-21 13:57:37

You need to ask your Consultant. I was advised that the general rule for exercise is a heart rate of 80% of the figure arrived at by deducting your age from 220 and never more than 220 minus your age.

Iam64 Wed 27-Oct-21 14:25:57

Jane43, that sounds complicated. I’m mathsphobic but I dont expect I’m the only one to feel a bit challenged. I’m 72, does it mean my heart rate shouldn’t exceed 168? How would I know?

Mattsmum2 Wed 27-Oct-21 14:59:10

I had a heart bypass in 2018 and walk every day. Have you been offered any cardio rehab or have a cardiac nurse? You need to check with them or your consultant.
The British Heart Foundation also have great resources online and nurses you can message.
Best of luck x

Whiff Wed 27-Oct-21 17:30:30

Ramblingrose had another thought there is something called action heart think it is run via hospitals but can't be sure. Also you could contact British heart Foundation there may be a group you could join in your area.

Whiff Wed 27-Oct-21 17:31:52

Sorry Mattsmum just noticed you suggest BHF.

Ramblingrose22 Wed 27-Oct-21 17:39:32

Thanks for the replies so far.

The consultant told me my condition will not be reviewed or monitored and I don't know when I'll next be seeing my GP.

If I had needed a stent maybe I would have been referred for cardio rehab.

I'll calculate the figures based on what Jane43 was told and see about contacting the British Heart Foundation.

Candelle Wed 27-Oct-21 17:50:22

The British Heart Foundation has great information and their nurses are very helpful: it is possible to ask them anything (heart related!) no matter how silly or worried you may feel.

Ring on 0300 330 3311, 9 - 5 pm

or

www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport

growstuff Wed 27-Oct-21 17:58:58

I had a heart attack and have a stent. During the 8 week cardiac rehab program, we did gentle circuit training and were advised to walk. However, it was supervised. There were nurses to take our blood pressure and we had to wear heart monitors. I would seriously advise talking to your GP or practice nurse before starting anything. You could look for chair exercises, maybe involving light weights, on YouTube.

growstuff Wed 27-Oct-21 18:01:34

Iam64

Jane43, that sounds complicated. I’m mathsphobic but I dont expect I’m the only one to feel a bit challenged. I’m 72, does it mean my heart rate shouldn’t exceed 168? How would I know?

It shouldn't exceed 80% of 168. If you know how to feel your pulse, you could do that or buy a heart monitor.

foxie48 Wed 27-Oct-21 18:41:03

You need to be aware that any drugs you take can affect your ability to exercise which is why it's better to take advice from a medic. eg I am on a low dose of Beta blocker + ace inhibitor for Atrial flutter, this keeps my heart rate low and means I have to adapt my exercise accordingly. I am nearly 73 but I can't raise it to 168bpm the drugs won't let me. resting heart rate this afternoon was 52, BP was 102/62 my GP is happy with this but I'll never run a marathon. Speak to your doctor.

Iam64 Wed 27-Oct-21 18:50:07

growstuff

Iam64

Jane43, that sounds complicated. I’m mathsphobic but I dont expect I’m the only one to feel a bit challenged. I’m 72, does it mean my heart rate shouldn’t exceed 168? How would I know?

It shouldn't exceed 80% of 168. If you know how to feel your pulse, you could do that or buy a heart monitor.

Thanks growstuff, google tells me 134. My treadmill test showed 158 once I was put on an incline. I have AF. I’ve been complaining about breathlessness. My consultant did an echo cardio gram, said my heart function is good. He hopes the meds will regulate the af, his advice is don’t exercise in heat . That’s stopped hills in heat.

Jane43 Thu 28-Oct-21 10:12:20

Iam64

Jane43, that sounds complicated. I’m mathsphobic but I dont expect I’m the only one to feel a bit challenged. I’m 72, does it mean my heart rate shouldn’t exceed 168? How would I know?

Your suggested heart rate when exercising would be 220-72= 148, then 80% of this which is 118. The maximum recommended rate for you would be 148. Heart rate can be monitored by a heart rate monitor or a fitness watch which are quite inexpensive these days, I got mine from Amazon for about £25 and I can check how many steps I take each day and my heart rate if I am exercising. My DH also has a fitness watch as he has AF and he finds it very comforting to be able to check his heart rate although he is on Beta Blockers now. As I said before, be guided by your consultant. Heart conditions are scary at first but can usually be brought under control.

Whitewavemark2 Thu 28-Oct-21 10:23:14

DH has had 3 stents inserted a couple of heart attacks and a pace maker.

After his stay in hospital he attended classes where the emphasis is on exercise and good diet, but that is after the blocked arteries were dealt with though, so I would definitely seek advise.

Iam64 Thu 28-Oct-21 12:31:59

Jane43, thankyou. My cardiologist prescribed meds to try and regulate the AF because on the treadmill, my rate went to 158 quickly once incline was introduced. Resting is 72 so ok. I’d been reporting increasing breathlessness on incline for a year by then.
My Fitbit is not working. I’ll replace it.

jeanie99 Thu 18-Nov-21 20:47:02

Not the same problem as you but this is my situation.

I have aortic heart valve disease which means I have to be very careful about how high my heart rate goes.
I was advised by the hospital to not go higher than 130 heart beats a minute.
I bought and wear a chest heart rate monitor for all exercise and it works well for me.
You should be asking a health care professional for advice on this not asking on this site, that would be my advice. If you are not happy with your consultants advice ask for a second opinion.

beautybumble Wed 24-Nov-21 22:52:32

The most important thing is to seriously consider what you're eating. Please know that I want to help and not offend, but certain foods as I'm sure you know, block the arteries. There is a way to reverse that by giving up everything that contains fat. So all dairy, meat, fish, poultry and oils. I can recommend some great books that will really help if you're interested. I switched to this diet a few years back and recently had a full blood test. The doctor said he wished the results were for him. They were all excellent. So why not give it a try? As for exercise, don't do anything too strenuous for now, just walking and perhaps yoga, all good exercise. I wish you luck and hope you let me know about the books.

Hetty58 Wed 24-Nov-21 23:07:52

beautybumble, all oils? What about the heart-healthy kind? How would fat-soluble vitamins be absorbed?

growstuff Wed 24-Nov-21 23:10:42

Sorry, but cutting out all fat is dangerous. The body needs a small amount to absorb Vitamins A, D and E. Small quantities of unsaturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats are recommended to keep cholesterol levels healthy.

Please see a dietician and coronary care nurse.