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Joys of a new word

(4 Posts)
absentgrana Sat 27-Oct-12 18:06:24

I opened a bottle of Portuguese red wine a little while ago to allow it to breathe before tonight's supper. Reading the blurb on the back, I learned that it was a "violaceous rubi [sic] wine". I guessed that rubi meant ruby – not a major intellectual feat – but had not previously encountered violaceous. It means, fairly predictably, violet coloured and the label is so right. I have just poured a glass; it's the most beautiful colour, tastes delicious and I have learned a new word. Serendipity on a Saturday evening.

Bags Sat 27-Oct-12 19:24:03

smile

Anne58 Sat 27-Oct-12 21:29:15

I absolutely love finding new words! I can always remember when I first started reading books by Angela Carter, always seemed to need a dictionary to hand!

I think absent that you may be enjoying a form of "concupiscience" with regard to your wine. (Hope I got the spelling right, not the easiest word, and the dictionary is downstairs)

Very tired here, so off for a bit of nidification in preparation for an early night! (One must take all steps to ensure comfort)

janeainsworth Sun 28-Oct-12 12:56:34

Phoenix you are a onegrin
I've just had to google both 'concupiscience' and 'nidification' in order to fully understand your post, and while 'nidifcation' is fairly innocuous, absent may be either offended or possibly flattered by your use of 'concupiscience':
The never satiated desire to draw as much of reality as possible into one's self; the unlimited striving, for example, for knowledge, sex, and power
Has anyone else noticed that as soon as you come across a new word, it suddenly seems to appear all the time?
I have no doubt I shall spot both 'concupiscience' and 'nidification' in the next few days in the pages of the Daily Telegraph grin