Gransnet forums

Other subjects

public water fountains

(13 Posts)
paddyann Sat 03-Nov-18 12:48:50

is this the answer to the vast number of "disposable" water bottles that end up in the sea ? I well remember water fountains in parks when I was small and we had no problems using them,would people nowadays give up their trendy water and refill their own cups and bottles from these.

bit.ly/topuptapno1

MissAdventure Sat 03-Nov-18 13:00:30

I think a lot of people would be worried about germs these days.

travelsafar Sat 03-Nov-18 13:29:19

I re use my plastic bottles for tapwater. First of all i put them in a container of the fluid used to steralize baby bottles so i know they are safe to re use.

Luckygirl Sat 03-Nov-18 13:31:07

I would not worry about germs from water fountains - people do not put their lips round the spout - they just drink the water. I think it would be a great idea.

tanith Sat 03-Nov-18 13:44:49

I thought I saw that refill fountains were going to be installed in London I think it was sponsored by London Zoo and called #one less meaning less plastic bottles.
There is also a trial going on in Bristol and London where company’s like Costa and tourist attractions like Tate Modern will allow members of the public to have their bottles refilled for free. Sounds like a win win to me.

MissAdventure Sat 03-Nov-18 13:44:59

Oh me too.
I think they were great - some were really beautiful.

paddyann Sat 03-Nov-18 13:57:00

sorry the link didn't work its more a top up station for bottles,not the old fashioned style where you drink directly from it .I'll look for the link again and repost if I find it .

prestbury Sun 11-Nov-18 19:58:33

Of course around the country are natural springs, in a number of cases, piped at the surface so the public can use them. The nearest place to me is Buxton.

Cannot believe what people pay for bottled Buxton Spring Water when it is available for free, although sometimes there is a queue when the local pub and restaurant owners come to fill up there carboys then charge Joe Public an arm and a leg.

crystaltipps Sun 11-Nov-18 20:14:32

In France and Italy it’s common to have spring water fountains where you can fill up your water bottles. Should be encouraged more.

Apricity Sun 11-Nov-18 21:28:30

In Australia modern stainless steel drinking fountains, often with a separate tap to refill water bottles and a low tap and built in bowl for dogs are increasingly being installed in public places such as parks and playgrounds. Australian schools have had rows of outside drinking fountains forever.

Public drinking fountains seemed to fall out of favour for many years but have been rediscovered and redesigned as the importance of hydration is recognised. As your mouth doesn't touch the drinking spout there shouldn't be any concern for hygiene.

It doesn't have to be special spring water just ordinary old tap water. And it is a great way to reduce the environmental scourge of plastic bottles as is using refillable bottles.

Melanieeastanglia Sun 11-Nov-18 22:52:31

I think public water fountains would be a good idea. You don't have to put your mouth on the spout. We used to have them at school. You turned the knob and the water spouted up. Things were different in the 50's.

PECS Mon 12-Nov-18 09:10:33

Most of our local cafes will refill bottles with tap water: plastic or other. I have commented before on the current " obsession" with constant intake of liquid be it water or coffee etc! If a person is exercising I can see the need to rehydrate at the end of a session..or if long distance runnining etc. during . But shopping in town? Have a glass of water before you go out and on your return. I find the coffee sipping shoppers a bloody nuisance blocking aislesas they stop to slup! Grumpy...moi?

Mabel2 Mon 12-Nov-18 11:07:57

PECS, my dgd has a medical condition which requires that she has access to fluids at all times, and like many children is encouraged to have a water bottle at school. Research has shown that people are healthier if they are well hydrated. I see no problem with people drinking as they shop etc, provided they don't spill it on products for sale.