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Pedants' corner

I done me best, but...

(103 Posts)
AussieGran59 Tue 29-Mar-22 03:40:46

I wish I wasn't such a pedant. I have a wonderful dh but his family's grammar and misuse of words sets my teeth on edge.
"I done me washing"
"I haven't done nothing"
A roast dinner is called a baked tea, lasagne is 'lassarge', hydrangeas are hydarange...you get the idea.
My dh has a speech impediment and was apparently thrown into the "dummies" class at school, so I can understand, to a certain extent, his problems with words. He has not changed and I stopped trying to correct him as it did no good at all.
He is an intelligent, loving person so I don't mind.
But why do some families speak in this way? Why can't some people speak their own language correctly? I am certainly not perfect, but at least I seem to remember what I was taught in school. I done me best.

BlueBelle Tue 29-Mar-22 04:23:05

Why can’t some people accept other for what they are

Chewbacca Tue 29-Mar-22 05:26:25

You sound a peach hmm

FannyCornforth Tue 29-Mar-22 06:13:31

BlueBelle

Why can’t some people accept other for what they are

👏
And your own husband too.
Poor fella sad

Juliet27 Tue 29-Mar-22 06:52:18

BlueBelle

Why can’t some people accept other for what they are

But pedants’ corner is here because we generally have difficulty accepting errors that some people make. I understand the OP to a certain extend. Although her husband has a speech impediment that needn’t affect his correct use of grammar.

Grandma70s Tue 29-Mar-22 07:15:36

I would feel the same, but I probably wouldn’t have married someone who really got on my nerves. I am very sensitive about speech. My husband had an Australian accent, but it wasn’t very strong and his grammar was impeccable.

Are we sure this is a genuine post?

Mamie Tue 29-Mar-22 08:23:33

I think if you have sufficient command of the English language to be fluent in the vernacular, "I done me best" is perfectly acceptable as a reference to common parlance. 😀

eazybee Tue 29-Mar-22 08:36:38

"Why can't the English teach their children how to speak".

eazybee Tue 29-Mar-22 08:37:18

plus ?

Esspee Tue 29-Mar-22 08:50:21

A’m scots ‘n’ kin speak ma ain leid.

I would happily speak standard English with you but I’d be fair scunnered if you looked down on me if the odd wee bit of my native tongue slipped into the conversation.

lemsip Tue 29-Mar-22 08:53:27

AussieGran I done me best

are you for real?

volver Tue 29-Mar-22 08:55:31

"A baked tea"???

I think someone is having someone else on. hmm

ShazzaKanazza Tue 29-Mar-22 08:56:38

I dream of the day my autistic 7 year old grandson speaks to us. Any way he chooses to is fine by me. I will never correct him.

Coastpath Tue 29-Mar-22 09:40:18

A baked tea is called a gravy dinner in our family. Talcum powder is phoo phoo, any dog is a pupper and any child is a babber or nipper. 'Ark at ee means, 'Ohhh, listen to him showing off'.

Your teeth would be so on edge at our family 'dos' OP that you wouldn't be able to eat your gravy dinner.

Don't all families have patterns of speech and 'family names' for things? Isn't it endearing in people we love?

Callistemon21 Tue 29-Mar-22 09:42:21

Australians don't speak English! Surely you realise that?
(That was told to me by an Australian when I complained about an Australian niece having to take an English examination before she could work in the NHS.)

I done me best to understand.

Aldom Tue 29-Mar-22 09:52:03

volver

"A baked tea"???

I think someone is having someone else on. hmm

Why do you suggest that we are being 'had on' as you put it?
I have family in Australia so I know that a roast meal is referred to as a baked meal. Nothing deceptive about the term.

Aldom Tue 29-Mar-22 09:55:14

Oh! and Morning coffee is always referred to as Morning tea. That term harks back to Victorian times.

volver Tue 29-Mar-22 09:56:02

Well I take it back. I've never heard that before, sorry. And I lived in Australia for a few years.

You learn something new every day.

timetogo2016 Tue 29-Mar-22 09:58:02

If you understand what people are saying it should not matter how they are saying it.
Living in the Black Country,i have to work hard at what the locals are saying,but would NEVER pick them up on how they pronounce words.
Being a Brummie,born and bred i get asked on occasions what i just said.
I actually like accents , they can be fun.

Parsley3 Tue 29-Mar-22 10:00:14

Your husband must be relieved that you have stopped correcting him, AG.

Witzend Tue 29-Mar-22 10:07:03

Callistemon21

Australians don't speak English! Surely you realise that?
(That was told to me by an Australian when I complained about an Australian niece having to take an English examination before she could work in the NHS.)

I done me best to understand.

We used to have a book called ‘Let’s Talk Strine’
(Australian)

There was another on PoshSpeak, can’t remember the title* but I do remember one little gem:

‘I’m afraid they’re urnly cotton sheets, deah- cont emedgin what Mummeh would have said.’
(I might have misplaced the odd letter - it was a long time ago.)

*oh yes, it was ‘Fraffly Well Spoken!
There was another little gem about someone being ‘fraffly’ good at arranging flahs.’ 😂

MerylStreep Tue 29-Mar-22 10:13:35

Witzend
I was once given a book by a Lancastrian friend: How to speak Lanky. Hilarious 😂

Yammy Tue 29-Mar-22 10:23:22

Where I come from we have lots of words that we use that others don't and expressions that are peculiar to the area.
Two stick in my mind, one we say gaan or gaing for going.As quite a young child one of my mothers relatives though she was a cut above the rest of us and I always waited for her to drop the clanger. One day in her best queens English she announced "I didn't know if I was coming or gaing" my mother hurriedly moved me on as she could see I was going to laugh.
The other is we say git instead of got. Again I had to be refrained from laughing when some one in best English announced"Oh don't they get some git ups",when talking about "Come dancing."
I love accents and think they should be preserved but hope I have a reasonable command of English to be able to speak to be understood.

JaneJudge Tue 29-Mar-22 10:30:09

I moved away from the area I grew up in but my family there speak in regional dialect and although I still have the accent when I am in their company I quickly revert back to dialect. I think it is fascinating tbh

Callistemon21 Tue 29-Mar-22 16:08:58

I think we have a Strine dictionary somewhere, Witzend