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Pensions & benefits advice

Dental Charges for retired 77 year old

(36 Posts)
jeanie99 Tue 24-May-22 18:37:21

I've always paid reduced charges for dental treatment, free sight tests and free prescriptions as my understanding was you received this when retired.
I have just received an email from my dental practice and it includes questions asking for a certificate number which I use for claiming the reduced charge.
I don't receive any benefits from the government just receive a small retirement pension and occupational pension which I pay a small amount of tax on.
I've looked at the government site and can't find anything which helps me state the certificate number they are asking for.
Anyone have any ideas.
Thank you

MiniMoon Tue 24-May-22 18:51:47

Sorry to disappoint you, but to get free or reduced rate NHS dental treatment you have to be in receipt of pension credit.
My practice charges £23 for a check up and £42 for a filling.
Last time I went (in March) I paid £65 for filling gand check up.

MiniMoon Tue 24-May-22 18:53:19

That is pension credit or some other benefits.

Charleygirl5 Tue 24-May-22 18:57:51

You would be entitled to free prescriptions- I was at 60- I do not know if the age has changed.

I also think you are entitled to free sight tests again from 60 but I am afraid you will have to pay as MiniMoon and I do, the correct NHS dental charge.

growstuff Tue 24-May-22 19:05:32

It's possible you are eligible for some help, but you need to have a very low income and savings.

www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-low-income-scheme

M0nica Tue 24-May-22 19:23:15

Or be in receipt of Attendance Allowance or other disability pension, I think.

BlueBelle Tue 24-May-22 19:42:04

No I ve always paid for my dental charges because I m not on any benefits

BlueBelle Tue 24-May-22 19:45:25

If you ve been getting reduced prices you’re lucky as you shouldn’t have been

Soroptimum Tue 24-May-22 20:17:18

BlueBelle

If you ve been getting reduced prices you’re lucky as you shouldn’t have been

That’s what I thought straight away, but didn’t have the heart to say! My 88 year old mum has just paid about £700 for treatment (and she hasn’t got many teeth) grin

BlueBelle Tue 24-May-22 20:25:52

Well I m not heartless sortomum but to be getting reduced dental treatment for 12 years this poster has been extremely lucky and I can t really see how it’s happened can you ?

Soroptimum Tue 24-May-22 20:32:07

BlueBelle, not suggesting that at all! Think I meant I hadn’t got the courage. And, no I can’t see how that’s happened.

welbeck Tue 24-May-22 21:23:22

M0nica

Or be in receipt of Attendance Allowance or other disability pension, I think.

no i don't think so.
i think it has to be a means-tested benefit.
i know those in receipt of carers' allowance get nothing free or reduced.
and receive less than £10 a day.

StarDreamer Tue 24-May-22 21:45:16

Charleygirl5

You would be entitled to free prescriptions- I was at 60- I do not know if the age has changed.

I also think you are entitled to free sight tests again from 60 but I am afraid you will have to pay as MiniMoon and I do, the correct NHS dental charge.

Regarding the free sight tests, that is if one goes to the optician's premises.

Home tests are only free if one qualifies due to one's circumstances.

However, one can nevertheless get a home test if one pays.

www.outsideclinic.co.uk/

At one time they had an offer that if one bought some prescription glasses the eye test became free, but I do not know if that is the case at present.

I had them several times pre-pandemic, sometimes needing glasses, delivered and fitted by them once they had been made, and sometimes not needing new glasses.

They even made me some specially calculated glasses, I am wearing them at the moment, optimised for 60 centimetres distance, which is between normal distance glasses and reading glasses, so that I can comfortably sit and use a home computer. I swap which glasses I am wearing when I start and finish a session using the computer.

Two things though, at the time there was a need to plug the unit that displays the letters in to the mains and there needed to be a three metre line of sight between the patient and that unit, though whether that has changed I do not know.

BlueBelle Tue 24-May-22 21:51:17

Soroptimum 👍🏼

jeanie99 Tue 24-May-22 22:36:26

Thank you everyone for all the information.
I was just wondering what everyone pays for the dental check up, I've been paying £28 a visit.
I've not had any major work done, just a tooth out because of an abscess some years ago.
I was told to come back in 9 months the last time I went as my teeth are in good condition, thank goodness.
I am there tomorrow morning so I'll get it sorted out them. I genuinely didn't know.
I'm certainly glad I don't pay for my prescriptions as I'm on 5 now and with an additional two when one of my conditions flares up.
I do hate this getting old but as my husbands says what's the alternative.
Thanks again to everyone.

BlueBelle Tue 24-May-22 23:11:53

Thanks for coming back Jeanie £28 sounds right for a check up but what did you mean by this …..
* I've always paid reduced charges for dental treatment*

jeanie99 Tue 24-May-22 23:35:51

When I check in at reception they always ask "do you have free check ups or reduced cost and I always say no not free, reduced costs.
This was as I thought after retirement sight tests prescriptions and dental tests were free.

BlueBelle Wed 25-May-22 05:14:20

*When I check in at reception they always ask "do you have free check ups or reduced cost and I always say no not free, reduced costs.
This was as I thought after retirement sight tests prescriptions and dental tests were free*

But Jeannie that makes no sense at all if you thought they were all free why did you say ‘no not free, reduced charges’
.

BlueBalou Wed 25-May-22 07:16:01

I get free eyesight tests because of a strong history of glaucoma in my family.
Dentist- my last check up and hygienist visit was £84 😱, not private. It’s gone up from £68 six months ago (clearly I should have been a dentist bot a nurse! 😄)
I don’t understand how you’ve had 12 years of free dentistry without anyone asking for proof. I have to sign digitally the paperwork every time I visit the dentist.

H1954 Wed 25-May-22 07:24:31

If the OP is the in receipt of state pension and occupational pension, the total of which is high enough to fall into the taxable bracket of income, then evidently they should be paying full amount for dental care.
My state pension and occupational pension are not taxed and I have to pay for my dental treatment in full.

growstuff Wed 25-May-22 07:27:46

BlueBelle

Well I m not heartless sortomum but to be getting reduced dental treatment for 12 years this poster has been extremely lucky and I can t really see how it’s happened can you ?

It's possible she has had an HS3 certificate, which gives partial help with dental costs.

growstuff Wed 25-May-22 07:29:11

H1954

If the OP is the in receipt of state pension and occupational pension, the total of which is high enough to fall into the taxable bracket of income, then evidently they should be paying full amount for dental care.
My state pension and occupational pension are not taxed and I have to pay for my dental treatment in full.

It depends whether the OP has housing costs. If she doesn't and her income is high enough to be taxed, you're right that she should be paying full costs.

growstuff Wed 25-May-22 07:30:28

BlueBalou

I get free eyesight tests because of a strong history of glaucoma in my family.
Dentist- my last check up and hygienist visit was £84 😱, not private. It’s gone up from £68 six months ago (clearly I should have been a dentist bot a nurse! 😄)
I don’t understand how you’ve had 12 years of free dentistry without anyone asking for proof. I have to sign digitally the paperwork every time I visit the dentist.

She wrote that she paid reduced charges, not that it was free.

BlueBelle Wed 25-May-22 07:56:15

She was ‘offered’ free Growstuff but dentist don’t offer anything you get a form to fill in and if you DONT tick the benefit box you pays your NHS fee

growstuff Wed 25-May-22 08:09:59

I think you're right BlueBelle. The dentist should have checked before now. I once had an HS2 certificate, which meant I didn't have to pay anything, and I'm trying to remember how it worked. I had a plastic card, which I think I had to show every appointment.

This is a link to current NHS (England) charges:

www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/2022-04/HC11%20%28V17%29%20online%2004.2022.pdf

They're quite long-winded, so I'm not surprised the OP was confused.