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Travel

Travel insurance.

(25 Posts)
Georgesgran Mon 08-Aug-22 14:44:14

At 71, I’ve just secured Worldwide travel insurance (with the PO) for £160 - no health issues other than BP.
However, I’ve just seen that a young Emmerdale actor has died on holiday in America and his family has launched a Go Fund Me Appeal for £17K to return his body. That’s all terribly sad for them, but is it not about time that travel insurance was made compulsory?
When my DD2 (full time wheelchair user) booked her first trip through Thomas Cook, they held her booking until she could show her Insurance Provider and policy number. I’ve always felt that if you can afford the trip you can afford to insure it.

Fleurpepper Mon 08-Aug-22 14:56:31

Agreed. One woman had a stroke in Turkey a few years back and had to crowdfund because she was not insured. Could not come home for months - ans she thought she would be covered as Turkey is in Europe???

My OH, AC and all family know- if I die abroad, my body will stay where I fell. I find the idea of repatriation of dead body just nonsense. What difference does it make?

Pittcity Mon 08-Aug-22 15:00:12

I agree.
You should also remember to buy your travel insurance at the same time as booking your trip and not leave it until nearer the date. That way you're covered for cancellation, delay etc. that may happen before you go. Some people think that you are only covered for the dates of the holiday that are on the policy.

MissChateline Mon 08-Aug-22 16:19:39

Over the past 25 I’ve travelled all over the world, initially backpacking around countries in SE Asia several times a year and latterly on slightly more planned and hotel based holidays. I used to go to Geneva and Spain on a regular basis as well. In Europe the EHIC card sufficed and I’ve never once bothered to buy travel insurance as I’ve always thought it a rip off. I once needed treatment for a severed tendon in my little finger in the Canary islands and not once was I asked if I had insurance. On a couple of occasions when I’ve had minor need for an antibiotic cream for a bite or similar in Asia I’ve gone to the local pharmacy and paid pence for what I’ve needed. I really hope that it doesn’t become compulsory. From my experience insurance companies will do anything to wriggle out of paying out.

LOUISA1523 Mon 08-Aug-22 16:24:51

MissChateline

Over the past 25 I’ve travelled all over the world, initially backpacking around countries in SE Asia several times a year and latterly on slightly more planned and hotel based holidays. I used to go to Geneva and Spain on a regular basis as well. In Europe the EHIC card sufficed and I’ve never once bothered to buy travel insurance as I’ve always thought it a rip off. I once needed treatment for a severed tendon in my little finger in the Canary islands and not once was I asked if I had insurance. On a couple of occasions when I’ve had minor need for an antibiotic cream for a bite or similar in Asia I’ve gone to the local pharmacy and paid pence for what I’ve needed. I really hope that it doesn’t become compulsory. From my experience insurance companies will do anything to wriggle out of paying out.

🙄

Joseanne Mon 08-Aug-22 16:30:01

Belt and braces job for me. GHIC, insurance through bank (monthly fee), and even take my carte vital to France, though no longer in the system. Years of carting several unfortunate people to doctors or A & Es abroad made me extra careful to be covered. It's peace of mind.

Calendargirl Mon 08-Aug-22 17:24:23

If people can’t be bothered to buy travel insurance, they shouldn’t expect others to tin out when things go wrong.

And if they say they can’t afford it, they shouldn’t be going on the holiday in the first place.

Car insurance, house insurance, travel insurance, it’s only when things go wrong you realise how much you need it.

Fleurpepper Mon 08-Aug-22 17:36:27

MissChateline

Over the past 25 I’ve travelled all over the world, initially backpacking around countries in SE Asia several times a year and latterly on slightly more planned and hotel based holidays. I used to go to Geneva and Spain on a regular basis as well. In Europe the EHIC card sufficed and I’ve never once bothered to buy travel insurance as I’ve always thought it a rip off. I once needed treatment for a severed tendon in my little finger in the Canary islands and not once was I asked if I had insurance. On a couple of occasions when I’ve had minor need for an antibiotic cream for a bite or similar in Asia I’ve gone to the local pharmacy and paid pence for what I’ve needed. I really hope that it doesn’t become compulsory. From my experience insurance companies will do anything to wriggle out of paying out.

Them were the days MissC. We were young, we were in EU- things were very different. Even then, if you had a severe accident, and it can happen even when you are young, I can attest to that!

At our tender age, it just does not bear thinking about. In EU, you will be asked to pay now as a 3rd country resident, and in the US and long haul, it could cost millions. Just not worth the risk.

BTW the last two holidays we booked, we had to show proof of insurance, medical, accident and repatriation. Good.

Blondiescot Mon 08-Aug-22 18:43:15

I agree that it should be compulsory. Just because you've never needed it doesn't mean that one day you might find yourself thankful for it. My aunt's husband had a heart attack on board a cruise ship in the Med and had to be flown back to the UK by air ambulance - the cost for that was astronomical. I've heard of people having to remortgage their houses to foot medical bills incurred abroad because they didn't have insurance - or their insurance was inadequate.
And you should always take out travel insurance as soon as you book your holiday. That way, you're covered if anything should happen and you have to cancel - that happened to me a few years back when I was rushed in for emergency surgery two weeks before we were due to go on holiday.

Floradora9 Mon 08-Aug-22 21:33:57

Some insurance companies do not include the cost of bringing a body home in a holiday policy so he maybe had some insurance.

MissChateline Mon 08-Aug-22 21:42:26

My understanding is that the EHIC card is valid until the expiry date on it then you can apply for a GHIC card. Though I’ve no idea what that might entitle one to.
I’m curious about being of a “tender age” what is this? I’m 67 and never consider myself to be “tender”. I’ve never had a days illness in my life that could be considered to be of concern, I’ve never taken any medication apart from the occasional paracetamol and keep myself fit and healthy. Heaven forbid the day that I enter the “tender” stage !

Jaxjacky Mon 08-Aug-22 21:52:36

Our friend, who was ‘press ganged’ into taking out comprehensive travel insurance, rather that just his EHIC card fell badly on a Greek island. He had brain surgery in Athens and air ambulance back to the UK, all covered, it wouldn’t have been on his EHIC. He was 64 when it happened, 2018.
I agree it should be compulsory.

Joseanne Mon 08-Aug-22 22:09:44

You're right Jaxjacky that travel insurance should be taken out in addition to the GHIC. It actually states this on the back of my card.

SueDonim Mon 08-Aug-22 22:11:21

MissChateline being healthy won’t protect you from accidents. I fell on my own driveway and incurred a double fracture of my leg, the evening before we were due to go to the Caribbean for ten days. Instead, I spent ten days in hospital.

Our travel insurance paid up every last penny of the thousands of pounds the holiday had cost, including our cat’s boarding cattery fees.

Joseanne Tue 09-Aug-22 07:31:16

I don't understand why it has to do with age whether anyone takes out holiday insurance?
I have accompanied several visiting children to hospital abroad and one was a baby. Probably in half the cases we were asked about insurance, though to be fair the EHIC used to be the thing they wanted to see. Repatriation of a body without financial assistance doesn't bear thinking about.

Humbertbear Tue 09-Aug-22 07:45:22

Being healthy won’t stop you from catching something. DH caught viral pneumonia on the plane to the States. We came home a month later with a bill (eventually met by our insurance) for over £250000 and that was fifteen years ago. At that time it cost £25000 for an appendectomy in the States. presumably now at least double. If you can afford the holiday, you can afford the insurance and shouldn’t assume that people will crowd fund for you.

henetha Tue 09-Aug-22 10:15:32

A friend of mine became ill in New York and was in hospital for 5 days. The bill was nearly half a million dollars. It's a good thing that she had taken out good holiday insurance.
I always have insurance when I travel abroad, but not if I holiday in UK.

Oldbat1 Tue 09-Aug-22 13:29:04

Ehic now ghic will only cover what the locals are entitled to. Eg in France you are expected to also have personal insurance. I’ve known friends who had a fall requiring surgery and it cost them thousands. No excuse for no medical insurance - do not rely on ghic as it won’t cover repatriation.

Cabbie21 Tue 09-Aug-22 14:11:22

I have for the first time taken out travel insurance for the UK, in case of cancellation, more than anything else.

Shirley48 Tue 09-Aug-22 14:23:04

MissChateline

My understanding is that the EHIC card is valid until the expiry date on it then you can apply for a GHIC card. Though I’ve no idea what that might entitle one to.
I’m curious about being of a “tender age” what is this? I’m 67 and never consider myself to be “tender”. I’ve never had a days illness in my life that could be considered to be of concern, I’ve never taken any medication apart from the occasional paracetamol and keep myself fit and healthy. Heaven forbid the day that I enter the “tender” stage !

As others have said, one may be fit and healthy, but accidents do happen, and can be very costly. One of my daughters (mid 40s) was run over by a cyclist on a Greek island - she had a broken arm and ankle and several other injuries. She herself was a keen cyclist, had run marathons, was a county level swimmer, etc. She was fortunately insured, as the whole episode was very costly

Nannarose Tue 09-Aug-22 16:07:56

The cheapest travel insurance asks you to use your GHIC cover as first port of call, so it only covers more advanced care.

Because of different levels of cover from different countries, costs vary a great deal. And reciprocal health care agreements can be variable - different countries have different definitions of words we take for granted 'hospital', 'clinic', 'nursing care' etc. and the GHIC only normally entitles you to the care that nationals of that country would receive.
Miss Chatelaine - you have been fortunate. Whilst I agree that some companies are a real rip-off (I have once done a package holiday and they tried to sell me what was essentially private health insurance costing a fortune compared to my normal annual policy) you are really taking a chance when you see some of the situations outlined here.

In some countries, nursing care is seen as an 'extra', so nationals of those places know they must rely on relatives, charities, or pay up! Holiday makers can be bewildered by this (and so can their companions!)

Fleurpepper Tue 09-Aug-22 16:16:33

My brother, 69 at the time and as fit and a fiddle, said Holiday Insurance is for sissies. He went to Domenican Republic and caught an infection there- had to stay 2 months in hospital- no money! Then the family had to pay his bill and pay for his flight back. We were NOT amused.

Visgir1 Tue 09-Aug-22 16:32:07

Did anyone read the Money pages in last week Times about the 84 Yr old trying to get Ins for a world Cruise with Cunard. Sorry can't get the link to work...
Cunard wanted the above person to have 2 million insurance cover with repatriation included. They were in Good health, so didn't think they would have any problems. It was only because they wanted to upgrade thier room this came up, not told at the time.

It was 103 days, cost over £46. 000 each.
They tried everywhere but couldn't get it.. The Money Page in the Times tried as well even Lloyds of London to find any cover. Max they could find was £25 k cover.
As they couldn't find they correct amount of cover, they had already put down the deposit, they had no option to cancel however Cunard then refused to Refund the £14 k deposit and wanted to issue a voucher.
Hence this person wrote to the paper for help and advise.
Apparently due to Covid, they said Insurance companies have reduced cover and upped the conditions. Travel agent they were told are now facing these problems with older people wanting to go on long Cruise's.

Norah Tue 09-Aug-22 17:37:21

We buy policy that has access to removing parts before purchase. We include flight of remains home, flight to hospital at home, care while away, but nothing for luggage, trip delay or cancellation for illness, death, or any reason really. If we can afford to travel we can afford to lose the cost of the trip but not our health.

CornflowerBlue Tue 09-Aug-22 18:17:50

My student son was involved in a very nasty car accident abroad, and is incredibly lucky to be alive, albeit with life-changing injuries. The insurance company did their utmost to avoid paying out, which made an extremely stressful and terrifying experience even worse. However, when it became apparent after a month in hospital with a number of operations, that he needed to be repatriated by road ambulance as flight was not an option, they paid up for most of it - a very vast sum indeed. Thank goodness for the insurance! However, I do not trust them and would hate to be in that sort of position again, arguing for them to honour the contract, but also, I have seen how huge the bills can be without insurance, and I wouldn't dream of travelling without. What would've happened if he'd had no insurance? It wouldn't have been him selling his house, as he didn't have one - it would've been us! And even that would be nowhere near enough! I can't even imagine how much further stress that would have caused!