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Earthshot Prize Repairing Our Planet aired on BBC

(29 Posts)
Redhead56 Thu 14-Oct-21 08:18:22

Has anyone else been watching this programme introduced by Prince William and Sir David Attenborough. It is a global prize awarded every year until 2030 to global finalists who come up with solutions to repair the earth.
The Earthshot goals to protect and restore nature revive our oceans to clean our air and build a waste free world and fix our climate. It will also be streamed on Discovery.

Scones Thu 14-Oct-21 08:55:00

I haven't seen it, but I was so heartened to read this morning what Prince William had to say on the subject of putting the earth first and space second.

Newquay Thu 14-Oct-21 08:58:54

I caught the end of episode 5 last night-was so impressed have recorded the other episodes

Alegrias1 Thu 14-Oct-21 09:09:24

Scones

I haven't seen it, but I was so heartened to read this morning what Prince William had to say on the subject of putting the earth first and space second.

That quite upset me actually. He doesn't know what he's talking about and ill-informed interjections from self important young men with a media voice can make things worse. sad

Shropshirelass Thu 14-Oct-21 09:16:51

I agree with William, we need to correct our planet and get back on track with nature first and foremost. The programme is well informed and to the point.

Alegrias1 Thu 14-Oct-21 09:29:40

www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/index.html

Please, please, look at it, and please appreciate that going into space isn't about space rockets and Mars Bases. Its about earth observation, and identifying and measuring the impacts of pollution and climate change. Dismissing it as a billionaire's plaything is not going to help, and William's advisors should have told him that.

GrannyGravy13 Thu 14-Oct-21 09:35:30

Totally agree with your post Alegrias1

Grany Thu 14-Oct-21 09:46:20

Suggest fewer palatial homes, no helicopter flights and maybe don’t fly by private jet. And burning land for grouse shooting.

Like father, like son. Don't let them use climate change for their own PR. #COP26 #EndTheMonarchy

Prince William needs to keep his ill informed opinions to himself. This is politics, and while space tourism is questionable, science benefits from space exploration. We may agree or disagree, but lectures from a hypocrite who can’t be properly challenged are a real problem.

henetha Thu 14-Oct-21 10:51:14

I think Prince William comes across well, and is genuinely concerned about our planet. I don't find him self-important at all. And he is not a hypocrite i.m.h.o.
And Prince Charles has been talking about the earth's problems for decades.
However, having said that I think our exploration of space is important and brings knowledge and advantages. And it is in the nature of mankind to explore. We never would have proogressed beyond the cave otherwise.

Peasblossom Thu 14-Oct-21 11:11:53

Just celebrity culture.

Whenever I see stuff like this I can’t help wondering how many resources were used and how much pollution generated in making the programme.

I’ve always thought that about David Attenborough jaunts around the planet followed by lectures on preserving it.

Everybody wants to save the planet without giving up anything they really want to do🙁

Grany Thu 14-Oct-21 14:43:51

What can the royals offer Cop26? A pledge to rewild their vast estates
Chris Packham

On Saturday morning I marched through a sunny Green Park in London with hundreds of children and families, to a rather grander set of gates, those of Buckingham Palace. Outside, with song and dance and flags, we called for the royal family to rewild their vast estates and bring wildlife back to our land. No threats or violence here. Instead a jazz band, papier-mache animals, fabulous hats and that most democratic and polite of protest actions: a petition, this one organised by campaign groups Wild Card and 38 Degrees and signed by more than 100,000 people. With one young protester actually admitted through the gates to deliver the petition, there was hope, not fear, in the air.

The difference could not have been more stark, and I’m just glad for the royals that their gates came off better than mine.

But this sharp contrast deserves consideration. Because these events represent two very different versions of the future of our landscape and very different ideas about how to achieve it. On the streets of London last Saturday I was privileged to meet young people who, even after being utterly failed by my generation, are somehow still optimistic that change might save them. On the track outside my house, I suspect I saw people who were filled with anger that such change was coming and that their age of assault on the living world may finally be over.

On the eve of the crucial Cop26 summit in Glasgow, at which members of the British monarchy are due to appear, the royals with their estates will find themselves forced to pick a side in this historic battle. The astonishing 1.4% of the country the royals own (that’s an area of land twice the size of Greater London) define some of the most nature-depleted landscapes in the world. In their more than 345,000 hectares (850,000 acres), huge areas of grouse moor and deer-stalking estates are, in the name of sport, kept artificially barren where exquisite temperate rainforest could and should grow. Grouse moors in particular – considered by experts to be ecological disaster zones – are regularly and deliberately burned. By annihilating the vegetation (and just about everything else that lives there), grouse moor defenders claim to be conserving historic landscapes while actually only preserving a colonial-era attitude to our precious natural world.

Elsewhere, royal land further undermines the environmental leadership that some royals have sincerely attempted. For all his love of tree planting, Prince Charles’s Duchy of Cornwall sadly has just 6% tree coverage compared with the EU average of 38%. No amount of cheese and wine-powered Aston Martins can fix that one. Meanwhile the Queen’s Sandringham estate, campaigners estimate, has barely 12% of its 20,000 acres set aside for priority habitats according to estimates by campaign group Who Owns Norfolk?. With Prince William recently taking to the BBC to champion rewilding, one wonders if the royals are actually aware of the current state of their own land – although pictures of William out hunting with his son do continue to jar with me. I do so wish we could meet and address these issues.

Thankfully, today’s young generation suffer no such delusions, and with their hope comes a piercing wisdom. They look at the nature-depleted landscapes of the royal estates and other big landowners and see an enormous opportunity to help cool their heating planet. They see a country in which 50% of our land is owned by less than 1% of the population and they see a glaring injustice with clear links to the environmental crisis. And when presented with the awe-inspiring thought that the Queen’s own estates could naturally feature beavers, golden eagles, bison and lynx, this generation doesn’t hesitate for a second: “Bring them back!” they shout. It’s a no brainer.

So as the royal family prepares to take to the world stage in Glasgow next month, I only hope that they carry those young people’s ambitious hopes with them. Making a commitment to rewilding on royal land before Cop26 would signal that their hope is not hollow. Restoring those 850,000 acres to nature would boldly say to the world that where rainforests have been destroyed, it can regrow, where species have vanished, they can return, and where flames of anger burn, progress can still win out.

Scones Thu 14-Oct-21 16:26:14

Alegrias1

www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/index.html

Please, please, look at it, and please appreciate that going into space isn't about space rockets and Mars Bases. Its about earth observation, and identifying and measuring the impacts of pollution and climate change. Dismissing it as a billionaire's plaything is not going to help, and William's advisors should have told him that.

I take your point Alegrias1 and must admit that I have let myself be led by the headlines which all seem to be about space travel being the new plaything of billionaires and film stars. I will do more reading.

My passion for humans to be doing a lot better on Earth has perhaps skewed my judgement.

Alegrias1 Thu 14-Oct-21 16:37:01

Thank you Scones.

Even if William was referring just to space tourism, its already being picked up as "space science is wrong" and I think that's a pity, and will be counterproductive.

Grany Thu 14-Oct-21 20:23:52

What about William really taking climate emergency seriously and RF rewilding their vast amounts of land.

Namsnanny Thu 14-Oct-21 20:38:59

I'll reserve judgement until I've seen the programs. The only thing I'm confused about is the talk about going into space.

I thought Earthshot was about rewarding people (and therefore publicizing the aims) who came up with novel ways to help the planet?

Grany Fri 15-Oct-21 09:52:30

Time to dissolve monarchy, stop living off others, enough of the "photo ops"they call "work".None of them knows the meaning of work or altruism. They are no better than the rest of the people of the UK..entitlement and enabling needs to end

Namsnanny Fri 15-Oct-21 10:51:49

Namsnanny

I'll reserve judgement until I've seen the programs. The only thing I'm confused about is the talk about going into space.

I thought Earthshot was about rewarding people (and therefore publicizing the aims) who came up with novel ways to help the planet?

All I can find talks about prizes for innovative solutions to help the planet.

What do others know that leads to worrying about space travel, that I dont?
Interested to knowsmile

Alegrias1 Fri 15-Oct-21 10:57:43

Namsnanny, William made an offhand remark in an interview about how the world's greatest brains should be concentrating on saving the planet instead of looking for new places to live in space. (I paraphrase!)

I think the interview was being shown to promote the prizes.

Anniebach Fri 15-Oct-21 11:13:37

Was that 9 minute trip the American actor took yesterday scientific

Alegrias1 Fri 15-Oct-21 11:18:10

Anniebach

Was that 9 minute trip the American actor took yesterday scientific

Right, cancel all the satellites, put an end to earth observation, close NASA down. And ESA, while we're at it.

A 90-year old actor had a fun trip to space, so its all just a waste of money.

Namsnanny Sat 16-Oct-21 12:01:24

Thank you Aligrias1 my googling wasnt very successful.smile

Blossoming Sat 16-Oct-21 12:06:43

Alegrias1

www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/index.html

Please, please, look at it, and please appreciate that going into space isn't about space rockets and Mars Bases. Its about earth observation, and identifying and measuring the impacts of pollution and climate change. Dismissing it as a billionaire's plaything is not going to help, and William's advisors should have told him that.

Absolutely! I was astounded at the sheer ignorance of his statement.

Blossoming Sat 16-Oct-21 12:09:52

Anniebach

Was that 9 minute trip the American actor took yesterday scientific

William Shatner is Canadian. You’re welcome smile

Namsnanny Sat 16-Oct-21 14:29:26

But isnt it true that some space travel is aimed at a first past the post scrabble to harness minerals and even water by one country or another?
In order to A) safe guard interests B) financially exploit new places?
So any travel will be a step towards that.
Not just for benevolent or benign scientific purposes.

MerylStreep Sat 16-Oct-21 14:44:47

Namsnanny Who do you think mans the International Space Station