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AIBU

Wasps AIBU

(42 Posts)
Absgran Wed 14-Jul-21 14:33:30

Am I being unreasonable?
There is a wasps nest in the hedge between my front garden and next door. My hedge was recently cut and the person who was doing it kindly offered to cut next door’s side as well. Was badly stung doing so. The nest is in their hedge which has grown into mine and therefore in their garden. My next door neighbour was informed but has refused to do anything about it as they don’t bother her! I am allergic to wasp stings however. So she told me if I was bothered to sort it out myself!

Sardinia2020 Wed 14-Jul-21 14:39:17

I think I’d get someone in to sort it. You’ll be worrying constantly while it’s there. Maybe your neighbour will feel guilty and offer to contribute to the cost but if not, that’s life. You won’t do them any little favours again - if you did before.

greenlady102 Wed 14-Jul-21 14:45:35

Sorry but yabu. Wasps are important pollinators like bees and hover flies. I am sorry the hedge trimmer got stung but they will do that if disturbed. If the nest is in your neighbour's garden and at the front, then how near to it do you need to go?

cornishpatsy Wed 14-Jul-21 14:59:22

She has said you can get it moved if you want to, as she said, it doesn’t bother her so why would she pay to move it.

AGAA4 Wed 14-Jul-21 15:30:54

As you are allergic I would get rid of it. The wasps will come into the house later in the year. My neighbour had this problem last year as the nest was nearby. The wasps found their way into her kitchen and she was stung several times.

Where bees don't bother you wasps do. They are more aggressive.

greenlady102 Wed 14-Jul-21 15:37:59

AGAA4

As you are allergic I would get rid of it. The wasps will come into the house later in the year. My neighbour had this problem last year as the nest was nearby. The wasps found their way into her kitchen and she was stung several times.

Where bees don't bother you wasps do. They are more aggressive.

actually they aren't...just like bees, wasps won't sting unless they feel threatened.

M0nica Wed 14-Jul-21 16:09:35

There are always occasions when the needs of humans are more important than those of insects or animals. Now I will be trolled!!

Last summer we had bees nesting between the interior lining and outer cladding of our garden shed. I first noticed them when they attacked me and chased me halfway down the garden. After that I could not get within 20 foot of the shed, which is large,contains the stock of our small antiques business and DH's work area and a lot of my vegtable garden

I spent hours googling to see if there was any way I could move them on, I then googled all the local pest removers until I found one who was overtly pro bee, who agreed to come and look. After he was mobbed by bees before he got anywhere near the nest. He agreed this was an exception to the rules and the only thing to do was to destroy it. And he did.

Absgran you are in exactly the same position as I was, in this case it is your health at risk. Get someone in to destroy it.

As for the plea for the wasp. I was listening to a R4 program this week about wasps. What are described as 'yellow jackets' are only a tiny proportion of all the different types of wasps around, most of whom we do not notice because they have different behaviours and neither nest near nor bother humans.

We were parked for a while in a country layby yesterday and I was looking into the hedgerow and saw a mass of insepcts around one type of plant. When I looked closely I realised they were very small wasps. I was looking at a myriad number of the wasps that go about their pollination business and bother no-one.

Clearing a dangerous wasp's nest like will do little or no damage to the number of wasps around busy playing their part in the world ecosystem.

Hellogirl1 Wed 14-Jul-21 16:11:39

I`m afraid I`d have to get rid, I`m terrified of wasps, more than anything else.

AGAA4 Wed 14-Jul-21 16:13:41

At certain times of year wasps are more aggressive as some have been turfed out of the nest to fend for themselves. This is when they access people's homes looking for a food source.
One settled on my jacket which was on the bed. When I put it on the wasp stung me. Yes they may sting when feeling threatened but if they come into your home you are more likely to disturb them and get stung.

Baggs Wed 14-Jul-21 16:37:45

When I looked closely I realised they were very small wasps.

Might they have been hoverflies? They look like small wasps but they do not have a "waist" like true wasps. And they don't sting people.

Baggs Wed 14-Jul-21 16:41:59

I agree with greenlady. If you don't have to go near the hedge you will not disturb the wasps so they shouldn't bother you. We have done this with a nest in a wall a couple of metres from our back door. No-one got stung all season.

We usually remove a queen wasp from our tool shed each spring though because that would constitute a problem. This year I had to remove her about five times.

However, if you have a severe allergic reaction to stings, It might be worth getting someone to deal with the wasp nest, as others have suggested.

Shropshirelass Wed 14-Jul-21 16:44:18

It needs sorting if it is close to the house and you have bad reactions. I was in our local farming store this morning and a customer in front of me purchased a can of something to deal with a wasp nest close to her house. I think it squirts foam over or into the nest. Your local council will come and deal with it, for a fee I suppose!

M0nica Wed 14-Jul-21 16:46:54

No, Bags These were clearly waisted wasps. Definitely not hoverflies

See this link en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasp .

Better still, here is the link to the programme I heard. It was this weeks episode of 'Rutherford and Fry' www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/5qnxfYXtDJGLCLZs9jV6qZ1/king-of-the-stingers-are-we-too-harsh-on-wasps

Baggs Wed 14-Jul-21 19:19:04

👍

agnurse Thu 15-Jul-21 02:16:42

I am not sure if you can get them in the UK, and I'm also not sure if it works for existing nests, but here in Canada you can buy hanging objects that resemble a fake wasp nest. You hang it in an area where you don't want wasps. Wasps are territorial, so they will see the fake nest, assume the area is taken, and go elsewhere.

grannysyb Thu 15-Jul-21 07:35:08

If they are aggressive and you are allergic, get rid of them. We have two beehives on our allotment, a few years ago we had one hive which kept stinging our next door plot holders, DH tipped a cup of petrol into the hive and finished them off.

DaisyL Thu 15-Jul-21 12:01:57

If you can bear to leave it until late autumn the wasps will die out and then the nest can be safely removed - they are works of art so beautifully made. Wasps don't usually return to the same place the next year and if you remove the empty nest it should be OK.

grandtanteJE65 Thu 15-Jul-21 12:18:17

Get an estimate or two to find out what it will cost to have the nest removed.

Your neighbour has agreed to this, and you are allergic, so why not tackle the problem?

The nest may well be in her hedge rather than in yours, but she is not bothered by it, you are.

If an estimate from your council or an exterminator is too expensive try the local bee-keepers, many of them will help with a wasps' nest too.

Yammy Thu 15-Jul-21 12:24:30

If you are allergic to wasp stings which can cause a severe anaphylactic reaction in some people, get rid of it. Phone around though and get a price even the council.
We had a large one in our loft and luckily found it at the end of summer one company told us to watch until no more were going in and out then to put protective clothing on rubber gloves etc and cover it with a large plastic bag and pull it completely away. Which DH did. Unfortunately, you have found it when it is very active.
If your neighbour can't be bothered to help you then I'm afraid you might find it very expensive, Rentokill used to do it.
Then think twice when they ask for help or agreement.

HannahLoisLuke Thu 15-Jul-21 12:28:53

agnurse

I am not sure if you can get them in the UK, and I'm also not sure if it works for existing nests, but here in Canada you can buy hanging objects that resemble a fake wasp nest. You hang it in an area where you don't want wasps. Wasps are territorial, so they will see the fake nest, assume the area is taken, and go elsewhere.

Yes agnurse, we can get them in the UK. They’re called Waspinators and I’ve read good reviews of them.

Craftycat Thu 15-Jul-21 12:38:10

Try your local council if you really want it removed. I used to work for our council & we were far cheaper than the firms that did it.
Having said that Wasps are really good news for your garden & will not attack unless provoked. I was terrified of them until I had to do the council course on pest control & then I saw them in a new light- never harmed one since.

Alioop Thu 15-Jul-21 12:42:40

I had one years ago and the council removed it. It was at the bottom of the drive and everyone coming to the house had to walk past it and I was frightened if anyone got badly stung. If you are allergic you need to get rid of it, it's your health that matters.

Direne3 Thu 15-Jul-21 14:04:08

I, like Craftycat, was terrified of them having been stung multiple times in my childhood. Then I learned to be calmer when they were around and despite years of working with both fruit sales (outdoor shop display) and an outdoor cafe area in a seaside town was never stung once (used to place a little jam on a saucer, placed well away from the area and found that they fed then left shortly afterwards). I warmed to them after reading about their life cycle - apparently after months of work feeding their young with aphids etc, they then are free to feast on the fruits of Autumn before dying in the winter. If I've remembered that wrong please don't disillusion me because (now in my advanced years) I can really relate to them. grin However, having said that, I do sympathize with your predicament Absgran and think yabu

M0nica Thu 15-Jul-21 14:55:53

We bought a very powerful aerosol wasp nests destroyer. You stand well back, about 4 metres, aim it at the nest, press the lever and it is blown to pieces and the insecticide in it will kill the wasps.

We used one to get rid of a nest in a hole in the masonry of our home in France. DH had to stand further back than 4m because the nest was just below a bedroom window and he needed to be at the right angle to get the foam straight in the hole, but it still shattered the nest, it landed in pieces in the front garden and we then sprayed it with wasp killer, juts to be on the safe side

I found a similar product on ebay. www.ebay.co.uk/itm/114875358265?hash=item1abf1adc39:g:GOAAAOSw1Mdgond1

Joesoap Thu 15-Jul-21 15:11:56

Get rid of the nest even if it doesnt bother your neighbour, it would be worth paying for it to be removed.If you are allergic a sting could be fatal.