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Pronunciation

(113 Posts)
Wake Sun 08-Aug-21 08:21:39

Is anyone else irritated by commentators on tv saying twenny twenny one instead of twenty?
My husband thinks I’m being picky but it’s really beginning to annoy me.

B9exchange Sun 08-Aug-21 09:01:57

Yes, it would annoy me, but we are all different, and I am sure someone will come along and say that language is changing all the time grin

Baggs Sun 08-Aug-21 09:02:02

You'd hate the local accent here. People say "twe''y".

I think you'll just have to accept being annoyed. Or joke about it. You won't change anything. Big shrug moment, I think 🤷‍♀️

timetogo2016 Sun 08-Aug-21 10:00:44

I think it`s where you come from,for such a small country we have so many different accents.
Two miles away from me the accent is totaly different,and a mile from there the accent is different again,and so on.

Sarnia Sun 08-Aug-21 10:38:31

Alex Scott, the former Arsenal and England footballer and now an excellent sports presenter has been criticised for not pronouncing the 'g' at the end of words. She is an East End girl born and bred, so how is she supposed to speak? Lord Digby Jones was so rude about the way Alex talks during her coverage of the Olympics that she stepped down from her presenting job. Thankfully she was back doing her job on last night's Olympic Games coverage, effectively sticking 2 fingers up at pompous Digby. Good for her!

Bellanonna Sun 08-Aug-21 10:46:30

I don’t think you are being unreasonable to feel irritated - you can’t control what irritates you - but I agree with Baggs: I think you will just have to accept your annoyance. There are so many varieties of pronunciation or word usage. One example is Bradley on The Chase always saying “was you?” But that’s just him being himself. Lots of other examples but I think as long as we say what we feel is right ourselves it’s ok. I do
sometimes correct my primary school age grandchildren but I’m not too bothered by what other people do or say.

Lincslass Sun 08-Aug-21 10:46:54

Depends were you are from, dialect is from an area, or country, accent is how you speak that dialect. Schooling in the 50s was definitely the three RRRs, and in my home county was once called posh because I pronounced words as spelt, ie twenty, but did get taken the mickey of when I said barth, instead of Bath.😂

Grandma70s Sun 08-Aug-21 10:49:10

It’s a social thing, which makes some people touchy about the subject.. There are many different accents, but Standard English, Received Pronunciation or whatever you like to call it, is the same all over the country.

A good example is Alexander Armstrong, who comes from the north east but there isn’t a trace of it in his speech.

Bellanonna Sun 08-Aug-21 10:55:17

Yes, the Barth, parth, clarss thing is funny isn’t it? I do wonder how thst started. It’s not very consistent though because, for example I would always say Kath for the name and maths for the subject. I’d say parss for the verb to pass but mass for a crowd. Definitely weird. At least those who use the short a throughout are being consistent.

Bellanonna Sun 08-Aug-21 10:57:14

Where does JRM come from? Can’t bear listening to him.

Blossoming Sun 08-Aug-21 11:01:59

I love hearing different regional accents and dialects, there are some splendid words and sayings out there.

I listen to a lot of audiobooks, Roman history being a favourite subject. One thing that does annoy me is when narrators have not bothered to do any research beforehand and mispronounce the names of historical characters. Cicero is a real bugbear! I do my best to ignore it, and I appreciate that people don’t learn Latin nowadays, but my inner self is still screaming “It’s Kikero” 😂

Lincslass Sun 08-Aug-21 11:13:26

Blossoming

I love hearing different regional accents and dialects, there are some splendid words and sayings out there.

I listen to a lot of audiobooks, Roman history being a favourite subject. One thing that does annoy me is when narrators have not bothered to do any research beforehand and mispronounce the names of historical characters. Cicero is a real bugbear! I do my best to ignore it, and I appreciate that people don’t learn Latin nowadays, but my inner self is still screaming “It’s Kikero” 😂

Talking about Latin, both grandchildren did it at school, now my friends daughter is teaching herself this language. I did a course a few years ago, with a very talented lady, an expert on Lincolnshire dialect. Very academic she was told if she wanted to get on in University, she would have to learn to speak the Queens English‘, as none would understand her. So in her words ˋ I had to learn another language‘.

JaneJudge Sun 08-Aug-21 11:15:25

My offspring miss out letters and it drives me mad smile

Grandma70s Sun 08-Aug-21 11:24:54

My grandson learns Latin at school, much to my delight (but less to his).

Newatthis Sun 08-Aug-21 12:39:53

All language is evolving - like it or not. It always has been and always will. They now teach gorra (got to), wanna (want to) etc in English language classes to people whose first language is not English. This is how it is spoken by many people therefore this is now how it is taught.

Lucca Sun 08-Aug-21 12:43:29

Blossoming

I love hearing different regional accents and dialects, there are some splendid words and sayings out there.

I listen to a lot of audiobooks, Roman history being a favourite subject. One thing that does annoy me is when narrators have not bothered to do any research beforehand and mispronounce the names of historical characters. Cicero is a real bugbear! I do my best to ignore it, and I appreciate that people don’t learn Latin nowadays, but my inner self is still screaming “It’s Kikero” 😂

I would pronounce it chichero

Lincslass Sun 08-Aug-21 12:45:02

Newatthis

All language is evolving - like it or not. It always has been and always will. They now teach gorra (got to), wanna (want to) etc in English language classes to people whose first language is not English. This is how it is spoken by many people therefore this is now how it is taught.

That is dreadful, does any other language get misused as much. If you are going to teach English, teach it properly, however they use it afterwards.

Newatthis Sun 08-Aug-21 12:57:03

If they teach it 'properly' i.e.' got to and want to' then when people from overseas listen they cannot understand sometimes and they will ask why the hear this pronunciation. I know this might sound shocking but in order to develop their fluency this is how it is done. Many people from the UK say 'wanna and gorra'. with very few pronouncing these kinds of words properly. This is also the same for words like gettin (getting) lookin (looking) etc. To become fluent in English they do not need semantics, but learn words in the context of a sentence and it is better if they are aware of common pronunciation and how it is spoken by the najority of English speakers..

kircubbin2000 Sun 08-Aug-21 15:03:30

I get annoyed with people who say CONTRA bute and DISTRA bute instead of con TRIB ute.

winterwhite Sun 08-Aug-21 16:45:26

Foreign names are a different category, esp when they have had English pronunciations for so long that anything else sounds forced. I would say Cicero (which I don't have occasion to very often) and not Kikero or Chichero , also Nearo. And never Roma, Milano, Firenze, Paree in ordinary English conversation.

Blossoming Sun 08-Aug-21 16:51:01

Lucca I would pronounce it chichero

I wouldn’t.

Blossoming Sun 08-Aug-21 17:02:00

Lucca I was somewhat puzzled by your response above, but I just realised you must be using a modern Italian pronunciation rather than a Classical Latin one.

Grandmadinosaur Sun 08-Aug-21 17:44:56

My pet peeve is on our local radio station. One particular news reader always pronounces the word year as yur. It really grates on me every time. We are in Yorkshire and I think it is the way it is pronounced on the other side of the Pennines .

nadateturbe Sun 08-Aug-21 17:46:55

kircubbin2000

I get annoyed with people who say CONTRA bute and DISTRA bute instead of con TRIB ute.

Now that annoys me too!

Lincslass Sun 08-Aug-21 18:01:16

Newatthis

If they teach it 'properly' i.e.' got to and want to' then when people from overseas listen they cannot understand sometimes and they will ask why the hear this pronunciation. I know this might sound shocking but in order to develop their fluency this is how it is done. Many people from the UK say 'wanna and gorra'. with very few pronouncing these kinds of words properly. This is also the same for words like gettin (getting) lookin (looking) etc. To become fluent in English they do not need semantics, but learn words in the context of a sentence and it is better if they are aware of common pronunciation and how it is spoken by the najority of English speakers..

That really doesn’t sound a reasonable excuse for people being taught, basically, poor pronunciation, which will possibly hinder them in a job search. So when they manage to read a book, see a film with proper pronunciation, they won’t be able to understand the words.