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Staff Leaving Work Early

(73 Posts)
Sheian62 Mon 01-Nov-21 11:50:52

Hi, what do people feel we should do regarding a manager who continually leaves early, saying she has lieu time (she most definitely doesn't).

My colleagues and me are fed up with her taking several hours off a week, last week 6 hours over various days without booking leave. She does this when her manager is absent from the office.

The issue has been brought to a senior manager's attention by 2 colleagues, but has not done anything, as they say they don't want to go down a formal route. However as we are a small team, it is likely that our manager will make life difficult if it goes down the formal route. That said, we want something done about it. It has gone on for years. Long before I started.

I am due to retire next year, but would like to see justice. Does anyone know what we can do about the issue. Is it the formal route and risk of upsetting the applecart or directly confront the manager and be the bad guy?

Tizliz Mon 01-Nov-21 12:18:20

Do you have all the relevant information? Is it possible she has hospital appointments she doesn’t want discussed, or attends AA meetings? Are there problems at home she can’t talk about. One of my managers had problems as his wife was depressed and some days couldn’t cope with their baby so he had to go home, I just assumed that the directors knew and as long as the team ran OK there were no come backs. It was difficult at times but we didn’t want him to lose his job.

eazybee Mon 01-Nov-21 12:21:29

The important point is: is she getting her work done or is it having to be completed by other people?
Is she needed during the time she is not there?
As you are retiring next year, do you really want to go out on a wave of trouble?
Are you sure you don't just want to take action because you won't be around to suffer the consequences?
Leave it to those who are having to work with this situation
to instigate proceedings, although if senior management have been informed and taken no action, I am not sure what they can do.

Sheian62 Mon 01-Nov-21 12:28:40

She is not getting her work done. She is leaving it for others to do. She just closes the department and leaves the answerphone on, as she wants to be at home with her husband or go off and "to a bit of shopping" or "got some packing to do" or "nipping early to go for a coffee with her daughter". Any excuse.

The problem has been going on for years and two colleagues are obsessed with it. It gets on everyone's nerves as we all have to book annual leave or make up time if we need to leave early.

I am retiring next year, so I guess I keep my mouth shut unless directly asked about it, as no, I don't want to out on a wave of trouble. Morally, it is a disgrace. It is the public sector, so we are all paying for the fraud!

Calmlocket Mon 01-Nov-21 12:30:00

If this has been bought to the senior managers attention and theyve done nothing, its pretty obvious she has a genuine reason for leaving work early. Theres a number of reasons why she could be leaving early and she does not have to broadcast it to her work collegues as its none of their business. You would like to seek justice, what justice? you dont know the full story! Leave well alone or you could end up with egg on your face!

Maya1 Mon 01-Nov-21 12:40:12

I worked for a Local council for over 20 years so l sympathise with you Sheian. During my time there l had 2 colleagues, both male who did exactly what you colleague is doing.
One lived over an hours drive away from the office so always wanted to leave early but never put it on his electronic timesheet. It was totally demoralising for the rest of the team who had to cover his work.

Riverwalk Mon 01-Nov-21 12:44:15

You're due to retire next year and the senior managers are aware - if I were you I would leave it be, to be honest.

Some time back I worked with a nursing department manager who barely, if ever, put in a full week's work - always off for a funeral, medical appointment, family crisis, and once a friend's illness(!) and so on. When not off to a funeral she would sneak down the back stairs, never to be seen for the rest of the day, particularly on a Friday when she had her train to catch back to her home town, as only in London weekdays.

Lilydrop Mon 01-Nov-21 12:59:14

I knew a manager like this and when a complaint to put nothing was done.
Also there were managers who had an hour going to the gym and then another hour for lunch when us lesser mortals were only allowed an hour lunch and were checked up on to make sure we did and this was a charity I worked for. Im glad I retired earlier this year, I worked there for 20 years and I dont miss it at all.

MissAdventure Mon 01-Nov-21 13:00:09

Where I worked for a housing charity, the senior managers were just as bad.
It's really not on, but I doubt you would get anywhere if you tried to push it.

These people close ranks and manage to oust people who threaten their cushy little numbers. (Not all, obviously, in case anyone takes offence)

rafichagran Mon 01-Nov-21 13:08:40

Yes, leave it you are going to retire next year, dont make it hard on yourself. There are always people like this.

Germanshepherdsmum Mon 01-Nov-21 15:57:24

Public sector, say no more. Been there, experienced that. Don't get me started. I've seen plenty of people paid by the taxpayer and ratepayer constantly starting late, not doing a stroke until they've finished their tea and planned the evening's telly viewing, leaving early, getting so behind with their work they had to go off sick with (self induced) stress then retiring on very nice pensions, much better than your average private sector worker gets. I was very glad to move into the private sector where realty rules and skivers tend not to get away with it.

winterwhite Mon 01-Nov-21 16:23:51

Could you suggest the introduction of an In / Out book kept near the door, with everyone signing in and out as they come and leave? Justified re fire risk. She would have to agree or say why not.

JaneJudge Mon 01-Nov-21 16:26:39

where I work if you are late or leave early, you have to make up the hours. I think this is generally the same everywhere unless you need to be there for set hours. Tell her manager when s/he gets back

Galaxy Mon 01-Nov-21 16:30:46

It's funny because my view of the private sector is of people only driven by money and not willing to go the extra mile.
Or I could be making sweeping statements about a whole sector based on a tiny snapshot of experience.

M0nica Mon 01-Nov-21 16:38:24

Do you belong to a Union or is there one in your workplace?

I found when faced with problems like this Union reps were very good at talking to managers about things like this in an informal friendly manner.

Elizabeth27 Mon 01-Nov-21 16:50:33

If senior management do not feel the need to address it then she must be doing her job well enough to ignore the early finishing.

Nannarose Mon 01-Nov-21 17:41:21

Please don't generalise. I spent my entire working life in the public sector and don't recognise this.
Given all my unpaid overtime, and all the stress I did experience, I find it upsetting. I accept it as your genuine experience, it is certainly not mine.

Public sector, say no more. Been there, experienced that. Don't get me started. I've seen plenty of people paid by the taxpayer and ratepayer constantly starting late, not doing a stroke until they've finished their tea and planned the evening's telly viewing, leaving early, getting so behind with their work they had to go off sick with (self induced) stress then retiring on very nice pensions, much better than your average private sector worker gets. I was very glad to move into the private sector where realty rules and skivers tend not to get away with it.

Nannarose Mon 01-Nov-21 17:42:05

PS: sorry for possibly going 'off topic'

MerylStreep Mon 01-Nov-21 17:57:42

I spent all my working life in the Private sector. Then in 86 went to work in the Public sector. A walk in the park. You could get away with murder if you were so inclined.

Casdon Mon 01-Nov-21 18:00:01

I don’t buy that at all Nannarose, because it’s just not true. There are hard workers and skivers in every organisation, and the private sector is certainly not nirvana.

Riverwalk Mon 01-Nov-21 18:04:05

Elizabeth27

If senior management do not feel the need to address it then she must be doing her job well enough to ignore the early finishing.

So anyone doing a good job can slope off early?

MaizieD Mon 01-Nov-21 18:07:58

Casdon

I don’t buy that at all Nannarose, because it’s just not true. There are hard workers and skivers in every organisation, and the private sector is certainly not nirvana.

I think that the second part of nannarose's post was quoting from Germanshepherdsmum's post at 15.57.

Casdon Mon 01-Nov-21 18:11:08

You’re right, sorry Nannarose, my comment is for Germanshepherd’smum.

Germanshepherdsmum Mon 01-Nov-21 18:13:23

Couldn’t agree more Meryl. I worked in the legal departments of two local authorities. My experience was as I said above. Moving to private practice was like moving to another planet. There I found what (client, not money driven) pressure really was. I stayed in the private sector for the rest of my career. I couldn’t stand the manana attitude of the public sector. I well remember when working in private practice trying to get some action out of a lawyer in a local authority legal department. He said I might be paid to work overtime (I wish!) but he wasn’t. Therefore it would get done when he felt like it. I also remember the satisfaction of reporting him to his manager.

Riverwalk Mon 01-Nov-21 18:18:00

The hospital I referred to in my earlier post was a major private one - there are lazy arses and slack managers in all sectors.