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Interesting items that arise off-main-topic in other threads

(11 Posts)
ElderlyPerson Tue 14-Sep-21 19:37:14

Interesting items that arise off-main-topic in other threads

Sometimes, for some reason, an interesting item arises off-main-topic in another thread.

This thread provides a place to note such interesting items.

ElderlyPerson Tue 14-Sep-21 19:42:41

In

www.gransnet.com/forums/chat/1300780-Radio-and-TV-Presenters?pg=2

something arose.

As a result this link was found

www.youtube.com/watch?v=91R-LkW2x3s

Richard III - The Scientific Outcome

This is a video of 4 February 2013 from the University of Leicester.

ElderlyPerson Tue 14-Sep-21 20:00:03

Within

www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1300783-Why-do-some-people-inform-an-adult-person-who-is-tall-of-the-fact-that-he-or-she-is-tall?pg=13

there are links to audio recordings of

The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster

One of them appears to possibly be an abridged version.

There is also a link to a cartoon version of Animal Farm.

There is also mention of Campanella's City of the Sun. Searching on YouTube offers several audio books of that utopian work.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RZe4Xd_2kE

Silverbridge Tue 14-Sep-21 20:12:01

Yes, some interesting diversions. Unless my eyes are deceiving me, I notice that there is no separate section on these boards for discussing History. Maybe something the GN staff could add to the list of added features and categories that members would like.

Maybe some of the books and stories that have been mentioned warrant discussion in the Books section. Again, I may be missing something but I don't think there is a book group as such, members reading the same book over a short period and discussing it. Was there ever such?

FannyCornforth Wed 15-Sep-21 06:53:21

Hello Silverbridge
I’ve often wondered why there isn’t a GN Book Club where members read and discuss a book.
I think such a thing did exist once, but fizzled out.
EP I’ve seen and commented on your thread suggesting that we do this, starting with The Machine Stops.
However, I think that a more snappy title is needed for the thread, eg ‘Read Together Bookclub - The Machine Stops’.
I’ll keep an eye open to see how things are progressing! smile

Silverbridge Wed 15-Sep-21 09:23:00

FannyCornforth I've replied over on the other thread and sent you a PM. It would be good to get something going (again) in this regard.

I can thoroughly recommend the film EP has linked above which announced the discovery of Richard III's remains. Old news now but a nice tie in to Josephine Tey's classic novel The Daughter of Time as we are in book reading mode. smile

shysal Wed 15-Sep-21 09:23:39

There did used to be a GN book club. They even supplied free books for the purpose.

glammanana Wed 15-Sep-21 09:26:41

FC We did have a book club quite a while ago every month a book was awarded to lucky GNers who applied for a copy to read and comment but that was stopped,some good books where offered I have 2/3 of them still.

FannyCornforth Wed 15-Sep-21 10:34:53

Silverbridge I be replied to you on the other thread too! smile
The gist of it is - would you like to start a Book Club? (Pretty please?)
I’ll deputise for you, if needed

FannyCornforth Wed 15-Sep-21 10:36:31

My old A level history teacher (a lovely old chap, Denys Cook) loved that Josephine Tey book. I must have read it, eons ago

Silverbridge Wed 15-Sep-21 10:48:27

The Daughter of Time was discussed in a recent BBC Good Read rerun which is what prompted me to read it again.

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01nl6hx

My local library retrieved an old yellowing copy from the stacks which hadn't seen daylight in eight years and was first stamped and issued in 1964! Echoes of when we had those little pocketed library cards. The book was first published in 1951. I haven't read any of Tey's other books but plan to do so. She, real name Elizabeth Mackintosh, also wrote as Gordon Daviot.

From Wiki:

In 2015, Val McDermid argued that Tey "cracked open the door" for later writers such as Patricia Highsmith and Ruth Rendell to explore the darker side of humanity, creating a bridge between the Golden Age of Detective Fiction and contemporary crime novels, because "Tey opened up the possibility of unconventional secrets."

I've been rereading the Highsmith Ripley novels and two bios about her so it all fits rather nicely.