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Food

Turnip, anyone? 😋

(99 Posts)
FannyCornforth Fri 24-Feb-23 12:39:14

Hello smile
Health Minister Therese Coffey reckons that we should ‘cherish’ the doughty turnip.
Have you ever done anything interesting with one?
As an aside, I’ve just been looking into what vegetables are native here in the UK.
It’s hardly anything. I’m amazed we survived.
It made me think of Terry Jones’ filth-loving peasant in The Holy Grail

Fleurpepper Sat 25-Feb-23 14:55:05

It's complicatesd, as she says. And food shortages could become much more severe and it is scary. The UK just cannot produce enough food at the moment, for all sorts of reasons.

fb.watch/iVSmGhjt2V/

Cold Sat 25-Feb-23 14:55:13

So let's thank Therese for her "let them eat turnips" contribution to the cost of living crisis

Where I live (Sweden) white turnips are pretty expensive and hard to find whereas "Swedes" are much more common .... although they are called "Cabbage roots" (Kålrot)

Fleurpepper Sat 25-Feb-23 14:55:48

And not just food either.

Witzend Sat 25-Feb-23 15:12:59

I remember reading a couple of years ago, that swede and turnips were becoming popular in France again, having been shunned for many years, because during WW2 they were just about all they had - most of the rest was taken by the occupying Germans.
I have certainly seen turnips in a large French supermarket not long ago.

Callistemon21 Sat 25-Feb-23 15:19:46

NotSpaghetti

I love swede. It makes a delicious gratin side dish with some garlic and lots of olive oil and breadcrumbs.
I am not a fan of turnips.

So I'm still not clear. 🤔
What do those of you call the small white ones if you call the big yellow ones turnips?
(This is a real question- not trying to have a laugh!)..

Good question 😀

Turnips and kale are for cattle said my Mum.
However, they'll be superfoods very soon.

Mamie Sat 25-Feb-23 15:21:04

Witzend

I remember reading a couple of years ago, that swede and turnips were becoming popular in France again, having been shunned for many years, because during WW2 they were just about all they had - most of the rest was taken by the occupying Germans.
I have certainly seen turnips in a large French supermarket not long ago.

The little white and purple turnips navets have always been popular. They are in the shops along with swede / rutabaga. The vegetable that is unpopular according to elderly neighbours is the Jerusalem artichoke / topinambour which was also used for fuel in the war. We used to grow them in our last garden and couldn't give them away. 😂

Catterygirl Sat 25-Feb-23 16:20:15

I slice turnips like you would potato chips and add them to home made tomato 🍅 soup with parsley and lemon juice. Then drop in Arabic coubah or kibbeh, which are made from burghal and stuffed with minced lamb and black pepper and parsley. Very nutritious I hope. Don’t make the coubah myself….too much faff. Buy them frozen.

Farzanah Sat 25-Feb-23 16:39:20

Fleurpepper

It's complicatesd, as she says. And food shortages could become much more severe and it is scary. The UK just cannot produce enough food at the moment, for all sorts of reasons.

fb.watch/iVSmGhjt2V/

Yes it’s a perfect storm really but Brexit clearly plays a part.

Callistemon21 Sat 25-Feb-23 17:13:24

Few countries are self-sufficient in food.

The UK is not as far down the list as some other countries in Europe but we need to ensure we look after our farmers and also consider the food miles involved if we buy produce from around the world.

Whitewavemark2 Sat 25-Feb-23 20:22:19

Seen on twitter entitled

TINA TURNIP

Farzanah Sat 25-Feb-23 20:50:52

Perfect 🤣

IrishDancing Sat 25-Feb-23 21:57:31

I have lived in Scotland for nearly forty years but am still confused about neeps, swedes and turnips. I’m Irish and the orangey coloured ones are turnips. I mash these with carrot and a bit of butter, salt and pepper and find them delicious. Maybe a Scottish Gran could put me out of my misery once and for all?

nanna8 Sat 25-Feb-23 22:02:40

I like turnips and usually roast them but they are fairly expensive and seasonal here so we don’t get them that often. I think they must be a cold weather crop.

Callistemon21 Sat 25-Feb-23 22:50:16

IrishDancing

I have lived in Scotland for nearly forty years but am still confused about neeps, swedes and turnips. I’m Irish and the orangey coloured ones are turnips. I mash these with carrot and a bit of butter, salt and pepper and find them delicious. Maybe a Scottish Gran could put me out of my misery once and for all?

The orange ones are swedes.

Fascinating Facts And Figures About Swede And Turnips
Swede - Facts and FiguresBotanically the swede is Brassica napus Napobrassica Group, a biennial usually grown as an annual. Its origins are unclear, but it may have been developed in Bohemia in the 17th century, as the result of a cross between a turnip and wild cabbage. Today the swede is one of the hardiest root crops, and is grown usually for autumn and winter use.
While it is generally known as ‘swede’ or ‘Swedish turnip’, in the USA it is called ‘rutabaga’, which derives from the Swedish ‘rotabagge’ meaning ‘thick root’. The swede is thought to have been introduced into Britain around 1800. It is said that King Gustav of Sweden sent the first swede seeds as a gift to Patrick Miller (1731 – 1815) of Dumfries and Galloway, and that this act resulted in the vegetable being called ‘swede’.

The turnip is Brassica rapa Rapifera Group; the species originated in central and southern Europe, probably around the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. The Roman scholar Pliny the Elder (23 – 79AD) regarded it as an important vegetable, and praised it as a great defence against famine. While it is mainly grown for its usually white, delicately flavoured roots, its leaves are also edible and eaten as ‘turnip greens’, Turnips are high in vitamin C.

blog.mr-fothergills.co.uk/fascinating-facts-figures-swede-turnip/#:~:text=The%20swede%20is%20thought%20to,vegetable%20being%20called%20'swede'.

FannyCornforth Sun 26-Feb-23 10:51:19

I know that this is a bit mean, but I’ve just learned that Therese Coffey is 51(exactly 2 months older than I am).
I thought that she was a good 15+ years older than that

MawtheMerrier Sun 26-Feb-23 11:37:14

Not kind, but she was frankly being patronising and ridiculous!

MawtheMerrier Sun 26-Feb-23 11:38:50

Not you Fanny !
This pic

MawtheMerrier Sun 26-Feb-23 11:39:56

Blimey - just 4 years older than D1 . Better not tell her, she’d be horrified.

Fleurpepper Sun 26-Feb-23 11:53:43

Just for a joke, which I know some might not find funny ;)

In French, a turnip is a 'navet' - which is used for 'stupid' or a flop (for an event, etc).

Farzanah Sun 26-Feb-23 13:46:14

But can you sing as well as Tina Turnip Fanny?

Fleurpepper Sun 26-Feb-23 15:39:54

And from The Mirror, this bastion of left wing remoaning extremism

Britain's Turnip King used to produce 30 million of the vegetable every year, but says business collapsed after the Tories came to power.

Farmer Richard Parry, who had a farm in Therese Coffey’s constituency, cast doubt on Environment Secretary’s suggestion that people turn to turnips to confront a lack of fruit and veg in supermarkets.

He says a combination of rising energy prices and labour shortages, partly caused by Brexit, made his turnip business financially unviable.

Reacting to Ms Coffey’s claim, Richard said: “I think she’s got the wrong vegetable.”

JaneJudge Sun 26-Feb-23 15:45:23

I have never even tried a turnip

62Granny Sun 26-Feb-23 15:55:58

I have never tried turnip, we have swede quite regularly, but the you don't see turnips around this area very often. I always think about Baldrick when they are mentioned😂