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Stroke and memory

(7 Posts)
Florencerosie Mon 26-Apr-21 17:06:02

Just wondered if anyone can identify with this. My close friend had a stroke nearly 2 years ago and appears to have recovered well. She is on tablets now and says she gets tired easily and then muddles or can’t think of her words, but can walk without aids and do the normal things.

Her personality has changed - she used to be quite opinionated ina good way! She now seems vunerable at times and not as independent. What I have noticed though is if we’re talking about , say, our families she will for example, last week a mutual friend was diagnosed with a condition her daughter had a few years ago. When I said oh that’s what (name) had, she will completely deny it and say no, she never did! This has happened on a few occasions, completely denying different things/events. I’m thinking it’s her memory but I don’t know.....

Oopsadaisy1 Mon 26-Apr-21 17:30:23

I’ve often found that people who , due to a medical problem, have memory problems often get extremely angry and upset if you tell them that they are wrong.

Normally I think that when there is no illness involved the person who has forgotten something will just shrug and say that they must have forgotten then, not get angry.

kittylester Mon 26-Apr-21 17:36:38

DS1 had a severe stroke 14 years ago, aged 35, he still gets very tired even now.

I would suggest, if you can, that the muddled memory is reported to the gp. Vascular dementia is often caused by strokes and tias.

The advice usually given is not to argue as people with vascular dementia are often aware that things are not right and pointing it out causes distress.

Thoro Mon 26-Apr-21 17:46:21

My husband had a stroke 4 years ago and was diagnosed with vascular dementia last year. He does get very tired and forgets a lot. I’m training myself not to ask if he remembers something recent although he can recall things from longer ago.
I don’t ever argue with him about what he does or doesn’t remember (unless I’m feeling really frustrated😉)

Blossoming Mon 26-Apr-21 17:49:17

A stroke is a brain injury. Neuro fatigue following a brain injury is common and it is not like ‘feeling tired’. After 18 years of living with it I still have days when I have to choose between sitting upright or eating, because I can’t manage both. My memory plays strange tricks but I’m wise to it’s shenanigans now 🙂 It doesn’t sound as though your friend acknowledges her memory deficits, or maybe she’s not aware of them. 2 years is a really short time in terms of stroke recovery, please have patience with your friend 🙂

Blossoming Mon 26-Apr-21 17:52:03

Some excellent resources on the Headway website if anybody would like to know more.

www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/effects-of-brain-injury/fatigue/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwyZmEBhCpARIsALIzmnIm_c3cdqFAPCR1Wf_PHtq-yn-iR-yktYGocBhHt53J4Kn_rgKQRDMaAvnPEALw_wcB

EllanVannin Mon 26-Apr-21 17:58:06

Very very fortunately, after a TIA 3 and a half years ago, my mind and memory remained intact and apart from a spell of dizziness and feeling as though I had two left feet, I continued on the right road to recovery.
It was more physically than mentally that I was affected, possibly saved by the fact that I take warfarin and statins.