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6 June D-day and the Normandy landings

(32 Posts)
MawBe Sun 06-Jun-21 08:43:36

In the early hours of a very different day 77 years ago something very special began. We cannot put ourselves in the heads of those young men, some little more than boys, but we owe them an infinite debt. I don’t think we can even imagine what sort of world we would have been living in today -if at all- without their bravery and sacrifice. They did indeed “put it to the touch, to win - or lose it all”
He either fears his fate too much, or his deserts are small
Who dare not put it to the touch to win - or lose it all

Mattsmum2 Sun 06-Jun-21 09:02:56

Well said, we indeed owe so much to so few. The new memorial in Normandy looks like a fitting tribute that really should have been there many years ago. Take care x

lemsip Sun 06-Jun-21 09:08:09

Thanks for your post MawBe.

Witzend Sun 06-Jun-21 09:13:34

Indeed. Lest we forget….

Jaxjacky Sun 06-Jun-21 09:14:53

Maw 💐

GrannyGravy13 Sun 06-Jun-21 09:26:29

I have been watching BBC morning news where they were showing the news memorial to be opened in France today, it is a stunning and fitting tribute to all the young lives lost.

Gajahgran Sun 06-Jun-21 09:27:11

Yes, I agree, we owe them so much. Lest we forget.

Aveline Sun 06-Jun-21 09:30:46

Yes. I hope the younger generations appreciate it too.
'For your tomorrow we gave our today'.

Whitewavemark2 Sun 06-Jun-21 09:36:53

We had our first family get together yesterday for over a year, and we were discussing covid and comparing it to other events in history.

All agreed including the teens that it pales into insignificance if you compare it to what the young men of my GS age faced as well as on the home front and the fear and deprivation of the two world wars.

timetogo2016 Sun 06-Jun-21 09:47:47

We certainly do owe them so much.
If those that died were here today they would certainly have a few choice words for the lazy youngsters of today.
My gs was telling his dm about the war that he was being taught in school,he burst into tears because children were waving goodbye to their fathers and they didn`t come back home to their families.
So pleased they still educate children about the wars.

BigBertha1 Sun 06-Jun-21 10:20:42

I'm proud to say my Dad was there at 18 years old in charge of a Beaufors gun on HMS Roberts. RIP brave Dad. flowers

Lin52 Sun 06-Jun-21 10:44:34

MawBe

In the early hours of a very different day 77 years ago something very special began. We cannot put ourselves in the heads of those young men, some little more than boys, but we owe them an infinite debt. I don’t think we can even imagine what sort of world we would have been living in today -if at all- without their bravery and sacrifice. They did indeed “put it to the touch, to win - or lose it all”
He either fears his fate too much, or his deserts are small
^Who dare not put it to the touch to win - or lose it all^

So beautifully said, thank you.

maddyone Sun 06-Jun-21 10:51:19

Well said MawBe.

Callistemon Sun 06-Jun-21 11:32:30

Thank you MawB

The years go by but we must not forget their bravery and their sacrifices which enable us to enjoy the freedoms we have today.

Jabberwok Sun 06-Jun-21 11:33:54

Proud to say that my maternal uncle was with the 2nd battalion Ox and Bucks LI at the D.Day landings aged 24. He survived thank goodness as we had already lost one close family member, and another later died of wounds while in North Africa.

Mamie Sun 06-Jun-21 12:11:08

Just reading about a 16 year old from the Durham Light Infantry who was the youngest soldier to die in WW2, buried in a lovely small cemetery, east of Bayeux.
We have recently moved house, still in Normandy, but now in a village where there was a fierce battle in August '44. Houses in the village had Canadian, French, Polish and British flags out today.
So much love and care goes into the remembrance here.

Mamie Sun 06-Jun-21 12:35:14

We will go to the new memorial at Ver-sur-Mer next week.

Jabberwok Sun 06-Jun-21 13:27:36

Mamie, people in Europe seem much more aware and thoughtful on these anniversaries than we do here in the UK. I think it could have something to do with the fact that we were never invaded and so perhaps feel less strongly than those countries that were. The Dutch are quite amazing the way they look after and revere the graves of those fallen and buried in local cemeteries as well as the designated war graves. I do wonder if we here would still be so thoughtful and respectful if it were the other way round?!

Alegrias1 Sun 06-Jun-21 13:37:31

Not related to D-Day as such but related to the War Graves.

DH and other members of the British Legion take care of some War Graves near where they stay. The men resting there are all pilots from the 2nd World War, there are Poles, Canadians, and other nationalities. Every year they have a poppy ceremony there and they invite children from the local primary school to lay a poppy for each man and to read out his name and country of origin.

Last year the descendants of one of the men came to visit was was very touched by the ongoing remembrance of their ancestor. Long may it last.

Mamie Sun 06-Jun-21 13:39:44

We have been told so many personal stories of occupation and liberation by elderly neighbours since we moved here. It is a real privilege to hear them at first hand.
One town near us has a population of Polish descent because of a historic mining community. It was liberated by Polish soldiers and the residents went out and took flowers to them as they arrived.

Whatdayisit Sun 06-Jun-21 14:06:11

Beautifully put Mawbe.
Forever grateful for the bravery and sacrifices made by all who took part.

Sarnia Sun 06-Jun-21 14:09:10

A lovely, thoughtful post. We should never forget the sacrifices made by so many, both servicemen and women and civilians.

EllanVannin Sun 06-Jun-21 14:17:25

My late H's uncle is buried in France.
He was killed, at the age of 21, on a troopship which was torpedoed in Genoa in the First World War. His body was brought to France with over 200 others and my late pa-in-law applied to the Home Office in 1953 where his body was then moved and buried in a separate grave in a cemetery in France.

His name is on a roll of honour at our local Town Hall. He was in the Medical Corps.

Callistemon Sun 06-Jun-21 14:18:37

Jabberwok if you had connections to anyone in the Royal Air Force, there is a memorial garden near Englefield Green at Runnymede which is beautifully kept and also has the names of those who have no grave, including my FIL.

Jabberwok Sun 06-Jun-21 16:18:44

Oh thank you Callistemon. I do know of the memorial garden and have meant to visit but somehow never made it! My father was aircrew in Bomber Command and lies with his companions in a private cemetery in Oosterhout,Nr Breda NL. My stepfather was in the RAF regiment stationed at Singapore when it fell to the Japanese. He was lucky to survive when so many didn't. I do have Runnymede in my sights.