Gransnet forums

Coronavirus

Am I being dense?

(20 Posts)
Oldwoman70 Fri 08-Jan-21 18:47:52

TV gives the local daily figures based on per 100,000 - for example "340 cases per 100,000 population". Can anyone explain why the figures are given in this way. Why not give the actual number - or am I being dense?

Oopsadaisy1 Fri 08-Jan-21 18:51:44

It’s a bit like saying that an area is the size of 3 football pitches, maybe they think we are too dense to figure it all out.

Blossoming Fri 08-Jan-21 18:52:04

Some places have larger populations. Giving cases per 100,000 allows a meaningful comparison.

Septimia Fri 08-Jan-21 18:54:52

It's extrapolated from the known numbers because the actual numbers might well be higher. Also, it makes it possible to compare different areas which might have very different population sizes.

If you want something closer to the real figures for your, or any other, postcode try looking at the official Covid dashboard. If you scroll down the page there's a place where you can search for your postcode area.

wildswan16 Fri 08-Jan-21 19:00:12

If you are told 100 people per 100,000 in your area have Covid, then you can easily compare the rate with a different area which has 120 people per 100,000. i.e. your area isn't quite as bad.

Most people know approximately how many people live in their area, so if there is 500,000 it is easy enough to work out that 500 have Covid.

grandMattie Fri 08-Jan-21 19:15:40

Why don't they tell us how many people have been discharged after recovering from Covid? It would be good news for a change, instead of the usual Doomsday scenarios we are being treated with daily.

MamaCaz Fri 08-Jan-21 19:31:27

Because, grandMattie, a lot of people who are discharged have not 'recovered' in the generally accepted sense of the word, they have merely survived, but still very far from well, and don't known if they ever will be.

M0nica Fri 08-Jan-21 22:14:44

I use the BBC site. It gives both absolute numbers and x per 100,000 www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51768274 .

FannyCornforth Sat 09-Jan-21 04:00:20

MamaCaz

Because, grandMattie, a lot of people who are discharged have not 'recovered' in the generally accepted sense of the word, they have merely survived, but still very far from well, and don't known if they ever will be.

Awful, but so true, and unless they have been affected, people don't seem to realise this at all.
I wonder how many people are in it for the long run?

growstuff Sat 09-Jan-21 04:06:47

grandMattie Even if it were easy to obtain the figure, I think you'd find it depressing. It's easy to work out how many people haven't died - yet. However, it's estimated that one in seven people who have been infected haven't recovered, even months after infection, and are still receiving ongoing care.

growstuff Sat 09-Jan-21 04:07:33

Cross post Fanny.

FannyCornforth Sat 09-Jan-21 04:16:50

So one in seven? Thank you growstuff

FannyCornforth Sat 09-Jan-21 05:45:13

Does anyone know approximately how many people have had Covid?

stella1949 Sat 09-Jan-21 07:37:35

FannyCornforth

Does anyone know approximately how many people have had Covid?

In the world - 88 million, with 1.9 million deaths. In the UK, 2.9 million with 79,883 deaths.

Hetty58 Sat 09-Jan-21 07:46:46

Oldwoman70, why the obsession with cases? Wherever you are, it's dangerous out there!

The figures only reflect the amount of testing, after all. All those with the virus, but without symptoms - that's about 30% of those infected - won't be tested or included.

So, whatever number you have, add another 50%!

M0nica Sat 09-Jan-21 08:05:25

Hetty The Office for National Statistics is running its own independent testing system, using a structured sample of the population www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/coronaviruscovid19infectionsurveypilot/8january2021 . This survey is not a reflection of the tests taken by people because they think they are in danger of getting, or have the disease, but a fixed sample, who are tested every week. These are the best figures to use if you want an idea of the actual incidence of COVID in the population..

But, as you say, 'it 's dangerous out there' and the best thing to do is make the best effort you can to protect yourself and your household.

Oldwoman70 Sat 09-Jan-21 08:07:19

Hetty I am not obsessed with the cases - just wondered why they are given per 100,000 rather than the actual number.

Thanks to those who explained

growstuff Sat 09-Jan-21 08:22:37

This link gives the actual number of new cases and the number of new cases per 100,000, so that a direct comparison can be made.

docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1APtcBmI4JeTR0Ysufjavgg2gy4MBiHz0Hf9eKIp5BSo/preview#gid=1865138965

It's from the public health authorities of England, Scotland and Wales and is updated every day.

growstuff Sat 09-Jan-21 08:25:57

The spreadsheet shows very clearly that yesterday (8 Jan) Preston and Manchester had almost the same number of new cases per 100,000, even though Manchester has a population of 547,627 and Preston has a population of 141,818.

FannyCornforth Sat 09-Jan-21 11:54:22

Thank you very much Stella.