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Education

Are you studying anything interesting? V2

(49 Posts)
PoshGran Sun 21-May-17 15:04:09

I thought I'd "restart" this thread as I'm very much into the idea of Lifelong Learning of any sort & love hearing of people's achievements.
Would previous posters like to give updates on how they are doing in their various formal courses & informal activities, & would current learners & those "thinking about it" like to share too?

Tizliz Sun 21-May-17 15:39:49

My memory is too bad for me to learn anything new. Had been trying to learn german but can't remember English let alone another language.

NonnaW Sun 21-May-17 16:33:56

Sadly I gave up on the Italian blush

GrandmaMoira Sun 21-May-17 16:50:00

I go to a class where we do "tasters" of a range of crafts. I am also nearing the end of the second year of the Open University' Humanities degree course.

suzied Sun 21-May-17 17:23:30

I'm still doing couture dressmaking and pattern cutting. I go to college one day a week have done it for 4 years. Making 4 bridesmaids dresses and my own outfit for sons wedding in July. ( I work best to a deadline!) have learned loads and made a whole circle of friends and always have something to do at home.

MargaretX Sun 21-May-17 21:41:37

I am continuing French after getting an O level donkey's years ago. I:m lucky in that the class is mixed, men and women and all of them interesting people with a sense of humour. Of course I am the oldest but then I am whatever I'm doing.
Due to reading a thread on GN I bought a digital piano and started playing again. i gave up piano lessons as a 10 year old. This piano has brought me so much pleasure.

PoshGran Tue 23-May-17 20:58:37

I will try again after "losing" an earlier post...
Thank you all for your replies.

Tiz - It's a b..... when the memory marbles play hide & seek, & then more infuriating if they decide to come back when they're no longer of any use!!

Nonna - I have signed up for a notification when a free online Italian course is due to take place again - fancy having another go?

GMoira - tasters sound good, how long do you spend on each craft? I did an OU degree when still working & they used to broadcast stuff at silly o'clock a.m & p.m. hmm

suzie - how lovely, what colour are you wearing & are you going to have a go at making a fascinator?

Margaret - great to keep a language skill current. We bought a Yamaha Clavinova for DS when he was 9. Thirty years on & he still plays for personal pleasure & is now passing the love on to 3 yo son.

Are there any others out there with revived & new skills & thinking? Come & share.
smile

Suki70 Tue 23-May-17 21:36:18

Poshgran I share your interest in Lifelong Learning and all my adult life have been working on something or other. In recent years I've learnt Italian through Adult Education classes, then private group lessons and now attend a U3A conversation group. The online Duolingo is very useful for revision and memorising. DH and I have been to dance lessons for ballroom and Latin. Over the last year we've both done various Futurelearn courses which are wonderful - online, high standard and free!

Luckygirl Tue 23-May-17 22:25:07

I am doing (very slowly!) a course from MIT - all their courses are available online for free. It is on harmony and voice training. It is a bit of a challenge and I dip in and out of it; but it is good for the brain I hope.

PoshGran Wed 24-May-17 20:05:25

Suki - I'm a recent convert to FutureLearn! This year I've done Good Brain Bad Brain Basics, Reading Poetry for Wellbeing, & am currently doing the Mindfulness course (for the second time!) As previously mentioned I'm patiently waiting for them to restart the Basic Italian course (1 of 6). Duolingo sounds interesting.
I used to dream of being able to dance "properly"; have you & DH used your skills anywhere nice?

Lucky - I guess you're a musical lady - I'm an enthusiast who can carry a tune & is not afraid to do it in public either (I lead weekly Rhymetime sessions at local library, 25-30 littlies from 6wks to 3yo plus their various carers). Being relatively new to MOOCS, MIT was not on my horizon, but I might have a look see.

I have seen something new today at a weekly craft group I go to (GMoira you might like this...)
One of our ladies brought in her "hooking & progging" equipment; fascinating to watch her use scraps of material to go towards making a 3D cushion cover. I'd heard of the craft when I lived in the NE but had never seen it done.
Live & learn! smile

Primrose65 Wed 12-Jul-17 17:00:12

I'm a part-time university student at the moment and I can highly recommend it - don't be nervous about going back to the classroom! I'm half way through a 2-year course, it's a couple of evenings a week during term time and I really enjoy it (except for the work deadlines of course!)

I was very nervous at the beginning that I would not be able to keep up or would make a fool of myself, but you'd be surprised at how quickly you get into the groove.

Suki70 Wed 12-Jul-17 18:44:56

What's the subject of your degree Primrose? In the 1980s I did an OU degree while I was teaching part time in a school during the day, at an Adult Education college one or two evenings a week and also had two young children. I can remember the essay deadlines well! It would be much easier now but when I retired I decided to never take any more exams or qualifications. Good luck with yours though!

Primrose65 Wed 12-Jul-17 19:42:35

It's a work related one - MSc in Management and business change. I've had a fairly long break from work (parent caring) but I feel I have a few working years left me in yet, so I thought this would be an appropriate way back into it.
I cannot imagine how you managed to study with two young children and a part-time job!

Eglantine19 Wed 12-Jul-17 19:44:18

I'd really like to do a Geology course. Not the OU. I need something I have to turn up to or it won't happen. I've looked but can't find anything.

Suki70 Wed 12-Jul-17 20:12:15

Primrose that sounds like a good move on your part, should give you an edge over other candidates when applying for jobs. Looking back I don't know how I managed a degree, plus p/t work and young children either! Seem to remember several extensions for essays an occasional year off between modules and a very understanding husband.

PoshGran Wed 12-Jul-17 20:53:36

Primrose - well done with your studies so far, it takes a lot of determination (& organisation!) to be a student & work & live a life - but the sense of achievement is great. My OU degree ('92) also gave me a pay increase!

Hi again Suki - teaching f/t, kids, OU, - snap grin. My graduation ceremony was at Ely Cathedral, Judi Dench received Honorary Doctorate too. I can honestly say I have shared a stage with her....for about 10 seconds!!

I understand what you mean about wanting to physically take part in a course Eglantine, such a shame you can't find anything to suit. I do know that OU is currently sharing a free Introduction to Geology course on Futurelearn (FL) - might it be worth a peek?

I'm currently doing a short FL course which is taking me way out of my comfort zone - Healthcare in Humanitarian Crises, run by London School of Health & Tropical Medicine. It's gruelling stuff at times!
I'm still waiting for the Italian course to come round, so biding my time with an occasional bottle of Prosecco.

Cheers all!!

Morgana Wed 12-Jul-17 21:43:38

I go to French class and german Conversation to keep up my language skills. Also attend two poetry writing groups. I need to keep the brain active!!

Eglantine19 Wed 12-Jul-17 22:10:28

I've never heard of Futurelearn. I'll look it up now. Thanks.

Primrose65 Wed 12-Jul-17 22:21:25

Thanks PoshGran, your course sounds a bit intense! I think I'd need a few bottles of Prosecco to get through a single lecture winewinewine

I'm envious Morgana, I struggled at school with languages and my only linguistic capability now is to speak into a translation app on my phone. Most days I struggle with English tbh.

M0nica Thu 13-Jul-17 13:12:25

I am lucky enough to live near Oxford and able to afford to pay the expensive fees charged by their extra-mural department.

I have signed up for a course on the Peninsula War next term, coming from a military family, military history has always interested me. The following term I am hoping to do a literature course on George Elliot's book Middlemarch. It was a set text at A level and at 16 I thought it totally unsuitable as it is a book about marriages, a lot of them and I relish the chance to look at it again with the knowledge 50 years has given me.

I sometimes do sewing and craft courses at a local craft centre but this year they do not seem to be running any that interest me.

devongirl Thu 13-Jul-17 13:16:17

M0nica I'm also interested in those courses, but I was horrified by the costs!!

M0nica Thu 13-Jul-17 13:17:19

I was another who did a further degree while juggling children, a part time job and a DH whose work took him away from home frequently and at short notice. It was 1 day a week for 2 years plus a dissertation in the third year.

I once apologised to my tutor because I handed in an essay seconds before the deadline. She said as long as it was in that was fine and she found women with families always did hand work in in time. It was the young and single that ran over.

I said for a woman with a family to undertake a course like mine you had to be well organised. Hence all the work handed in on time.

TriciaF Thu 13-Jul-17 13:38:57

When I was younger (early 50s) I studied law for a few years, a subject I've always been interested in. First I did O level, then A level then started a 5yr part-time degree at Hull University. But sadly had to stop after 2 years.
I was working full time, had 4 teenagers at home, and just couldn't spare the time for all the studying and written work involved.
I had hoped to change careers, but it was not to be.
The fees weren't all that high, especially for the O and A levels.

Imperfect27 Thu 13-Jul-17 14:33:17

All so impressive!

I was halfway through a p/time MA in Applied Theology when my daughter died in Aug 2006. I never went back to it. I was given the opportunity to take on a Graduate Teacher Training post , working full-time on the job in a local school in Sept 2007 (so helpful as I still had a school-aged child) and have worked more or less Full-time since then. Now at a stage where I am looking for a career change to take me through to retirement and have considered p/t funded MA, but not sure. I have started writing recently on the topic of grief - first as catharsis, but it is taking shape and may become a book - there, have said it publicly for the first time! I want it to be a 'layman's' book, but there is a technical element that I am having to research so philosophy and clinical / scientific reading ahead of me - if I can muster the discipline!
Incidentally - during the first half of my incomplete MA, I learned about the history of the decline of the church of England. At that time I had been 'single' for 6 years following divorce. My ex had been a vicar and I still went to church regularly and harboured this little hope that I might meet someone 'nice' in the congregation ... During my reading I had to study a great amount of statistics and came across the 'fact' that church is the place you are 'least likely to meet a white 45 year old man socially' (hah!). Changed my life ... after the worst of bereavement, I joined a dating site 3 years later and met Mr Right. grin grin grin

Imperfect27 Thu 13-Jul-17 14:33:46

All so impressive!

I was halfway through a p/time MA in Applied Theology when my daughter died in Aug 2006. I never went back to it. I was given the opportunity to take on a Graduate Teacher Training post , working full-time on the job in a local school in Sept 2007 (so helpful as I still had a school-aged child) and have worked more or less Full-time since then. Now at a stage where I am looking for a career change to take me through to retirement and have considered p/t funded MA, but not sure. I have started writing recently on the topic of grief - first as catharsis, but it is taking shape and may become a book - there, have said it publicly for the first time! I want it to be a 'layman's' book, but there is a technical element that I am having to research so philosophy and clinical / scientific reading ahead of me - if I can muster the discipline!
Incidentally - during the first half of my incomplete MA, I learned about the history of the decline of the church of England. At that time I had been 'single' for 6 years following divorce. My ex had been a vicar and I still went to church regularly and harboured this little hope that I might meet someone 'nice' in the congregation ... During my reading I had to study a great amount of statistics and came across the 'fact' that church is the place you are 'least likely to meet a white 45 year old man socially' (hah!). Changed my life ... after the worst of bereavement, I joined a dating site 3 years later and met Mr Right. grin grin grin