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House and home

Keeping/staying warm.

(36 Posts)
annsixty Mon 29-Nov-21 13:17:46

A few years ago a friend of mine was left very income poor after her partner died as his two pensions
died with him.
She was going to be ok after his will was proved as he had left her everything.
In the meantime she needed to cut down her bills.
In weather like we are having now she would get dressed in warm clothes and then put a thick dressing gown on top.

I have done this for several days now and what a difference it has made.
I am able to keep the house moderately warm so no shivers going from room to room and once the curtains are all closed mid afternoon it becomes lovely and toasty.

If by the remotest chance anyone should call it it it the work of seconds to slip the dressing gown off.

Sago Wed 08-Dec-21 11:02:54

Our gas meter is stuck, the gas company keep cancelling their appointments to fix it, they told us we won’t be paying for gas until it’s done.
Let it snow!!!!!!?

Chardy Wed 08-Dec-21 00:07:19

Ali08

I think menopause broke my inner thermostat as I'm usually quite warm. Well, apart from my feet which can be snug as bugs in furry slipper boots or whatever I'm wearing, but you can guarantee they'll be freezing cold once out!
I feel the cold most on my back, shoulders and arms so, if out, I generally have a large square wooly scarf, folded into a triangle, over my shoulders but under my coat!
Indoors, yes the trusty old dressing gown lives on the back of the sofa should I need it, and we have blankets downstairs - as well as upstairs should the need arise for a bit of extra warmth and we can just put them over our duvets!
If blankets aren't warm enough for you downstairs, consider buying extra duvets, then you can snuggle up on the sofa/chair!
I use hot water bottles, but have fleece covers on which tend to keep them warm for longer.
Those heated blankets a few of you have mentioned are great for arthritis, my daughter uses one for a stomach problem she has but you can place them on your tummy, or legs, behind you, at your neck etc - so very convenient!!

I agree that the menopause has a lot to answer for. When I come into the house I have to take off my coat and the hoodie underneath, and a few minutes later, the hoodie is back on, and so it goes on-off-on etc.

MayBee70 Tue 07-Dec-21 23:43:27

My house is @ 21 and, even with wearing layers of clothes and snuggling under a duvet on the sofa with the dog I still don’t feel all that warm.

Teacheranne Tue 07-Dec-21 22:24:56

M0nica

Gosh, Teacheranne, if I had the thermostat on 20, let alone 22, I would be lying on the floor like beached whale, gasping.

A house has to be left fully unheated for awhile to get mouldy. We didn't get out to visit our house in France, from July 2020 until September 2021 14 months.

It was shut up and unheated and went through a full winter. The house is in Normandy, a region with a high rainfall, hence all the grass and all the cheese, with temperatures similar to southern England We went over this autumn expecting to find a lot of mould, but found almost none, The house did feel damp and all the beds needed a couple of days airing, but otherwise, dust and spiders were the biggest problems.

I think one of my problems is that I spend a lot of time just sitting down as my arthritis is very bad at the moment. I’ve had to get a cleaner to help out so apart from cooking, I tend to spend my days crafting or reading!

My house had mould problems for several years after I moved in, it never seemed to feel warm and there was a lot of condensation on the windows in the winter. I tried to open the windows as much as possible ( difficult when out at work for over 12 hours a day ) but still ended up with black mould inside my wardrobes and behind my head board of my bed. In fact, my mattress was damp so I had to move my bed away from the adjoining garage wall and put it against the radiator!

I ended up having two wall vents put in my bedroom wall, changed the boiler to a more powerful one, put in two extra radiators and also had a positive air exchange unit installed in the hall. Now my bungalow gets toasty hot very quickly but I still try to keep an even temperature during the day rather than have cold spells.

Mind you, it does have to be cold for me to raise the temperature, I had it at 18 degrees all through the Autumn and only set it at 20 fairly recently. And there are times when I sit in just a T-shirt after I get in but I soon cool down and pop a jumper on.

My energy consumption have not gone up noticeably since I got my new boiler and was able to heat the rooms better. No more signs of nasty mould and no condensation on the windows.

Whitewavemark2 Tue 07-Dec-21 20:25:35

Teacheranne

I am not old enough to get any heating benefits, still waiting for my state pension, but I refuse to feel cold in my house. If I’m already wearing joggers, T-shirt and sweatshirt and feel cold, I turn the heating up from 20 degrees to 22 degrees for an hour or so. I’d rather do without something else than sit shivering or with a cold nose and I’m not going to wear hats or gloves in the house.

I’m sure my house heats up quicker when it does not get freezing cold, it does not take long for me to feel comfortable again. I worry about the impact a damp house would have on my health, mould caused by inadequate heating is hard to get rid of.

I think you are wise to ensure your house is kept adequately heated and aired. Mould spores are very detrimental to your health.

We keep the house at 21c. I could possibly tolerate it being very slightly colder ( but not a lot) but my DH has heart issues, with all the resultant medicines, and the optimum temperature for someone in his position is 21c. So that is where it stays, I work around it as his needs are greater than mine😄.

M0nica Tue 07-Dec-21 20:01:45

Gosh, Teacheranne, if I had the thermostat on 20, let alone 22, I would be lying on the floor like beached whale, gasping.

A house has to be left fully unheated for awhile to get mouldy. We didn't get out to visit our house in France, from July 2020 until September 2021 14 months.

It was shut up and unheated and went through a full winter. The house is in Normandy, a region with a high rainfall, hence all the grass and all the cheese, with temperatures similar to southern England We went over this autumn expecting to find a lot of mould, but found almost none, The house did feel damp and all the beds needed a couple of days airing, but otherwise, dust and spiders were the biggest problems.

Teacheranne Tue 07-Dec-21 17:07:01

I am not old enough to get any heating benefits, still waiting for my state pension, but I refuse to feel cold in my house. If I’m already wearing joggers, T-shirt and sweatshirt and feel cold, I turn the heating up from 20 degrees to 22 degrees for an hour or so. I’d rather do without something else than sit shivering or with a cold nose and I’m not going to wear hats or gloves in the house.

I’m sure my house heats up quicker when it does not get freezing cold, it does not take long for me to feel comfortable again. I worry about the impact a damp house would have on my health, mould caused by inadequate heating is hard to get rid of.

Grandmabatty Tue 07-Dec-21 15:57:28

I put on my dressing gown too and take it off to cook. I have an underactive thyroid and my metabolism doesn't regulate heat well so I can get cold very easily. I have the central heating on quite a lot in the winter but I am anxious about gas and electricity prices rising. Lots of good ideas here

M0nica Tue 07-Dec-21 14:54:12

I have always been a 'cold' person, even when I was a teenager. However, like others I do not like a hot and stuffy room. We have the thermostat set at 18.5 and my normal winter clothes, no matter where I am are thick tights, trousers/woollen skirt with at least two long sleeved layers on top.

I also add, extra cardi, thick socks and fingerless gloves, if needed, I have Reynaud's syndrome, thankfully only in my fingers and Iam known to wear fingerless gloves in the summer. Fortunately DD knits all mine for we so I have them in a arange of thicknesses, some with fleecelinings and some without.

Purplepixie Tue 07-Dec-21 12:44:17

I crocheted myself a lovely thick throw with super chunky wool. Corner to corner. Under that I have my hot water bottle and then I do my knitting. Dog blankets for Battersea cats/dogs home. Take care and stay safe.

muse Tue 07-Dec-21 12:40:16

Very sensible annsixty.

I've done all sorts to keep warm in our little cottage.
Temperature has been as low as 11° some mornings. It has a little roof insulation but that's all. No central heating. Heat is from the log burner, with its back boiler, and range when I have something in the oven. Our hot water tank is built in behind our bedhead so the bedroom has a radiator, of sorts.

Our settee has throws on it and and a lovely double layered one my daughter made me. This goes over my knees first thing in the morning and beyond if necessary. Three layers on my top half, fleece lined jogging bottoms, ski socks and my slipper boots.

We hope to move into our super efficient, well insulated new home in 2022 Urms with it's south facing windows and door. I envy you.

How do men do it EnaSharples? MrMuse is the same. He has a tshirt on, no socks, sandals as slippers in the house. Brrr.

EnaSharples Tue 07-Dec-21 12:01:56

I have osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis so I can't bear to be cold, everything just stiffens up and hurts like hell. I don't move around very well so I put my big woolly dressing gown over my clothes in the daytime and sit with a rug over my knees. Mr Sharples wears a tshirt.

Ali08 Tue 07-Dec-21 11:50:42

I think menopause broke my inner thermostat as I'm usually quite warm. Well, apart from my feet which can be snug as bugs in furry slipper boots or whatever I'm wearing, but you can guarantee they'll be freezing cold once out!
I feel the cold most on my back, shoulders and arms so, if out, I generally have a large square wooly scarf, folded into a triangle, over my shoulders but under my coat!
Indoors, yes the trusty old dressing gown lives on the back of the sofa should I need it, and we have blankets downstairs - as well as upstairs should the need arise for a bit of extra warmth and we can just put them over our duvets!
If blankets aren't warm enough for you downstairs, consider buying extra duvets, then you can snuggle up on the sofa/chair!
I use hot water bottles, but have fleece covers on which tend to keep them warm for longer.
Those heated blankets a few of you have mentioned are great for arthritis, my daughter uses one for a stomach problem she has but you can place them on your tummy, or legs, behind you, at your neck etc - so very convenient!!

V3ra Tue 30-Nov-21 16:37:39

My Grandma always called a dressing gown a "housecoat." I don't remember seeing her wear one during the day, but I wear mine sometimes especially if I'm sitting down doing something.

lovebeigecardigans1955 Tue 30-Nov-21 16:02:55

I miss my old airing cupboard and the idea of carefully laying out underwear in the bed with the electric blanket switched back on just came to me today. It gave me a lovely warm start to the day as a warm vest, etc is so nice first thing. I'll try to remember this each morning.

glammanana Tue 30-Nov-21 11:38:26

I have my heating on for 2 hrs after I get up to warm all the rooms (only a one bed bungalow) so it stays cosy all day I then put it back on for an hour at 6pm.
During the day I wear a cosy dressing gown not a long one just knee length which can be taken off if anyone calls unexpectedly.
This year I have bought 2 fleece duvet cover's which has made a fabulous difference I now don't suffer from cold feet during the night and don't want to get up in the morning the best purchase I have made this year.

merlotgran Tue 30-Nov-21 09:52:45

This thread has opened my eyes. I thought only the very elderly and infirm wore a dressing gown all day. Don’t you find it restrictive over clothes? Do you cook/bake wearing it?

I don’t like anything flapping round my legs so put a fleecy jumper on over my pyjamas when I get up and make tea. My dressing gown only gets used when I have visitors.

The last few days have been very cold so I dug out my thermal vest and some warm socks.

If I feel cold when I sit down for my afternoon cuppa I put a throw over my knees.

I’m on blood thinners so I’m surprised I don’t feel colder than I do.

Nannan2 Tue 30-Nov-21 09:45:46

My DD wears hers constantly when in the house, so does her husband, she answers door in it as well.😁

Nannan2 Tue 30-Nov-21 09:43:57

Stupid boiler engineer turned my 'setting' to 10 degrees as the answer to the boiler turning itself on during night even when thermostat was not even on(its a new wireless thermostat unit) the mans insane!

GagaJo Tue 30-Nov-21 09:36:37

I live in my dressing gown in the winter. I'm up, washed, made-up, dressed but put it on over the top. At times, I use it over the duvet where my feet are in bed. I even put it over my legs when I'm teaching online.

And the cats love it too. I thought my female cat was being friendly last night. She snuggled up to me on the sofa. Nope. My dressing gown was flapped open and she took the opportunity to lay on it.

Franbern Tue 30-Nov-21 09:11:49

Age4 - it is not just feeling warm that matters, it is how cold is the air you are breathing. 15 is far too low and hyperthermia is a danger to the very young and also to us oldies. 18 degrees should be the minumum for our age.

Whereas it is quite easy to keep feeling warm, with thermal undeclothes, layers, and throws, etc. it is important to remember the danger to health if the air around is us too cold. Not worth trying to save a few pounds and make ourselves seriously ill. After all, we are all in receipt of the two or three hundred pounds towards our heating bills. Use it.

Chardy Tue 30-Nov-21 09:08:56

There's a shawl permanently on the back of my chair, a surprise present made by a friend.

Pittcity Mon 29-Nov-21 22:23:35

I've got one of those shaggy, "teddy bear" zip up jackets that I wear over my jeans and jumper when sitting for a while. It slips off easily when I move around and warm up and is fashionable enough to be seen in public!
DH is still in t shirt and pj shorts as he says having the heating at 20 makes the house tropical. My body disagrees.

seacliff Mon 29-Nov-21 22:15:25

I love my rather tatty emu sheepskin short boots, a size bigger than normal, no socks, just so cosy and go over my trousers. I'll wear layers including real wool jumper, and a silk scarf keeps my neck warm.

welbeck Mon 29-Nov-21 22:05:12

i change into nightwear quite early so i am not disrobing in the coldest night-time.
i wear leggings, £3 at poundland, under fleecy pyjamas, £8 same store pepco, and a long sleeved t-shirt, two for £5 at lidl, under pyjamas top.
i also wear an old long sock to fill the gap around neck area.
with thick loose socks on feet which are kept on in bed, trous tucked in.
while downstairs and in bathroom i add large dressing-gown.
with feet up sideways on two seater, blankets on legs and shoulders, i manage to keep warm enough.
i often doze off here until woken by head falling too far.
takes longer to get to sleep in bed.