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Obligated - whatever happened to ‘obliged’?

(25 Posts)
Witzend Thu 13-Jan-22 12:01:33

I’m seeing it everywhere lately!

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 12:10:31

It's just another example of American English being used instead of the British English.
Language continually evolves and changes, especially now that we have access to the internet and American films and TV shows.

I once sent an email to ny daughter's work's email, using a Scottish word, meaning dirty. I was unaware that the meaning had changed over the years and my email was blocked by software. My daughter was mortified!

Grannmarie Thu 13-Jan-22 12:17:29

I'm now intrigued, Marydoll, and trying to guess your offensive Scottish word! Was it manky, minging, bowfing or something else? Please let me know, much obliged!🤣

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 12:53:26

Grannmarie

I'm now intrigued, Marydoll, and trying to guess your offensive Scottish word! Was it manky, minging, bowfing or something else? Please let me know, much obliged!🤣

Since you have asked, I feel obligated to reply wink
It was manky! They are all very descriptive words, GranMarie.
I have absolutely no idea why it was banned! She went on about it for days, becauses she had to ask the IT dept. (my SIL) to release the email.

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 12:54:18

Oh blast! I previewed and there are still errors. blush. Mea culpa!

Grannmarie Thu 13-Jan-22 12:58:40

Thank you, Marydoll🤣
I am much obliged...obligated doesn't feel right!
I don't know how to do italics 🤔

Calistemon Thu 13-Jan-22 13:01:58

It's a word I use sometimes, Marydoll
I'll be more careful in future

There is a slight difference in meaning between obliged and obligated

"Is it obliged or obligated? Obliged and obligated are verbs that mean required to do something".

Obligated has legal and moral aspects, while obliged does not always.
Obliged can also have a meaning similar to grateful.

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 13:07:15

GM, put ^ before and after the words.

As a teacher, did you ever get letters from parents, signed and obliged, wee Jimmy's mum?

and obligated doesn't sound quite right!

Esspee Thu 13-Jan-22 13:07:18

Manky has another meaning? I’ve just looked up the urban dictionary and their definition is the same as mine - dirty, unwashed.

LauraNorderr Thu 13-Jan-22 13:07:39

I suppose if one has an obligation to do something then ‘obligated’ might sound like the correct word. Personally I am not obliged to use a manky dishcloth but reserve my right to describe it as a manky dishcloth.

ElaineI Thu 13-Jan-22 13:08:13

Thanks Marydoll. I was thinking "clarty" 😃

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 13:08:52

There must be another meaning, but I don't have any idea. Anyway, I am now very wary.

Calistemon Thu 13-Jan-22 13:10:27

Esspee

Manky has another meaning? I’ve just looked up the urban dictionary and their definition is the same as mine - dirty, unwashed.

As in "My kitchen floor looks manky, must clean it"!

Marydoll Thu 13-Jan-22 13:11:25

I don't use clarty, but do use clatty, which I suppose could be a synonym for manky It is another useful word, it conveys so much.

Grannmarie Thu 13-Jan-22 13:36:32

Thanks for the italics tip, Marydoll. 👍
Yes, when I started teaching in Airdrie, in 1978, I remember receiving absence notes with the ' and / please oblige' sign off. The previous generation of pupils must have been taught that in Functional Writing.✍
That takes me back...

Oldnproud Thu 13-Jan-22 13:37:56

Even in American English, using obligated would be considered wrong in the sentences where obliged basically means grateful'.

I don't mind obligated as an alternative to obliged when it relates to a requirement (moral or legal, real or perceived ).

Germanshepherdsmum Thu 13-Jan-22 13:47:38

Thanks for showing me how to type in italics Marydoll. I feel awfully clever now!

MissAdventure Thu 13-Jan-22 14:25:11

Manly is used a lot here, (down South)

MissAdventure Thu 13-Jan-22 14:25:46

Oh Manky!!

Peasblossom Thu 13-Jan-22 14:28:49

Isn’t manky a corruption of the French ‘manque’ - useless, a failure?

LauraNorderr Thu 13-Jan-22 15:44:38

MissAdventure

Manly is used a lot here, (down South)

Were you showing off MissAdventute? Lots of hunky types in the south?

MissAdventure Thu 13-Jan-22 15:47:14

grin
Not for some time in my little neck of the woods, sadly.

MaizieD Thu 13-Jan-22 15:58:26

It's like the difference between 'given' and 'gifted', it's nuanced. But it won't stay nuanced for long because nearly everyone will use it and that'll be one more subtlety lost to the English language.

And what an ugly word 'obligated' is.

Can't think what on earth was wrong with 'manky', it's a very common descriptor of something dirty, messy, mucky etc.

grandtanteJE65 Sat 15-Jan-22 11:45:43

Wee Jeannie was ill in bed yesterday wi' the doctor was quite a usual phrase in notes received by Glasgow school-teachers in the 1960s and 1970s.

For the edification of those not from the Glasgow area: the bairn's mither intended to convey that the child had been ill enough to need a house call from their G.P.

Ali08 Sun 23-Jan-22 02:30:55

What other thing could manky mean? I've always known it to mean filthy, dirty, unwashed, too!
Oh I love clarty. "Been playing in the clarts and gotten yourself all clarty." Great words!
My GC are shocked if we say that really, REALLY dark grey colour as it's so naughty these days!! My dog had a few gingery brown brindles, but the rest of him was the opposite of white. I don't hear anyone complaining of saying, or calling people, white!!
Burglarised is another one. Why can't they just stick with burgled?
WOKE....maybe I should stop now, while my phone is still intact!!