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AIBU

Dogs to be kept on lead.

(137 Posts)
Santana Tue 10-Aug-21 13:58:32

AIBU to expect dog owners to keep their dogs on a lead, as per signage, in my local park. There are open spaces available next to it where dogs can run free.
The park has enclosed and unenclosed children's play areas, plus sport's pitches. I have checked the government website and parks like this are covered by Public Spaces Protection Orders and a fixed penalty fine can be issued.
I asked 3 dog owners yesterday, in a non challenging way, if they were aware of the signage. One said I was a dog hater, another looked at me blankly and continued to search for her dog's poo which she was unaware of until I told her.
Another lady was lovely and instantly put her elderly lab on the lead.
I think a visit from local PCSO might be helpful.

Elegran Tue 21-Sep-21 11:32:11

And not every dog is as well-trained and well-adjusted as yours are. Some are very quick to respond to an imagined threat. Some think that all humans want to join them in a wrestling match in the mud, even old ladies with zimmer frames or tiny children who are bowled over at the first lunge. Some are even encouraged by their psychotic owners to show aggression.

That is why there are areas with notices that leads must be worn. In other areas it is the law that dogs should be "under control", and a dog which is allowed to jump up at a stranger, put their paws on their shoulders and bark in their face, or attack another innoffensive pooch or chase sheep is NOT under control. Genuine dog-lovers know this and are the ones in control - on a lead when that is appropriate.

Elegran Tue 21-Sep-21 11:31:35

grannygranby

Good grief I had no idea and am so saddened there are so many dog phobics on here. I take my dogs to parks and woods twice a day where they romp off lead and have so much fun. They charm other people all the time going up to be stroked. Many a lone person has been charmed by their friendly attention. But then I love dogs who have been our companions for at least ten thousand years but never till now expected to be our leashed slaves. I think it’s appalling how they are treated. They deserve far more respect being the lifeline and comfort to millions. I certainly wouldn’t be the happy person I am today without them after many tragic human losses. I think dogs should have the right if at least an hour off lead in the open today. They have no freedom are totally under our control and so easily abused it’s heartbreaking, all I see on here is intolerance.

Have you actually read the posts, grannygranby? and seen just WHY each person is "dog-phobic" ? Each post is a true story of what has happened to someone and could happen to someone else even including at the paws of your beloved pets Dogs are descended from wolves, who live as a pack and defend one another if they are attacked. If your peaceful pet mistakenly thought that you were being attacked by another human, they could spring to defend you in a second.

Shelflife Tue 21-Sep-21 10:45:18

I am not a dog owner , but love them- DH not keen. I think dogs should be on a lead in parks and all public places. If your dog can not wear a collar then buy a harness!!! Many people are afraid of dogs , the elderly and frail are afraid of a dog knocking them over! Dogs are capable if behaving out of character if they feel threatened . Most dog owners are very responsible but a minority forget they are dogs!!!

Susysue Fri 13-Aug-21 00:53:03

Harmonypuss

I'm reading so many posts where people are saying that dogs should NEVER be allowed of their leads on this thread, can the same rule be applied to rude, unruly, obnoxious, vile children (and some adults)?
If not, why not? When I'm in a park with my dog (off-lead off course) I come across far more of these badly behave humans than I do badly behaved dogs!

Absolutely, harmonypuss, I think a dog off lead is the least of our worries!!

Harmonypuss Thu 12-Aug-21 22:28:25

I'm reading so many posts where people are saying that dogs should NEVER be allowed of their leads on this thread, can the same rule be applied to rude, unruly, obnoxious, vile children (and some adults)?
If not, why not? When I'm in a park with my dog (off-lead off course) I come across far more of these badly behave humans than I do badly behaved dogs!

effalump Thu 12-Aug-21 16:35:39

With all the dognapping going on, I'm surprised anyone lets their dogs off lead.

Jaxie Thu 12-Aug-21 14:44:50

Recently a large dog off its lead ran at me on the single track road I live on. I’m 78-year-old recovering from a replacement knee operation; all I had to defend myself was an empty shopping bag, which I held in front of my knee. The dog’s owner, a respectable looking young man bellowed at me, “Don’t touch it.” Would he speak to his aged mother or grandmother in such tones? We are besieged by dogs off their leads who run up our garden paths urinating and defecating whilst their owners look on, undeterred. If a child behaved like that they would be censorious, but dogs take precedence over humans in these times. I hope the homes of these irresponsible dog owners pong of stinking doggy do doos… after all, do they wipe their bottoms before they let them sit on their carpets?

fiorentina51 Thu 12-Aug-21 13:31:09

Kate1949
Good point.

sodapop Thu 12-Aug-21 12:42:24

My husband thinks Victoria Stillwell is best but not sure it's for her dog training ability grin

Namsnanny Thu 12-Aug-21 12:38:41

Golly whats wrong with Graeme? He seems very kind and talented to me.

I like his program too. He does seems to be very successful.

But Robert Alleyne seems a good choice for more 'energetic' hard to train dogs.
He also has sensible opinions on licensing, training for the trainers, and puppy farms.

MayBee70 Thu 12-Aug-21 12:13:21

None of my dogs has ever shown any desire to play with other dogs. I’m sure this ‘dogs need friends’ thing is quite new. My last whippet had a couple of dogs that we walked her with sometimes and she used to wag her tail when she saw them but that was about it. There’s no way that I’m going to take my latest dog to a doggy play park to play with dogs I don’t know. My dogs have been attacked too many times over the years for me to feel comfortable with that. Whippets have very thin skin and the slightest nip can result in a nasty cut and a trip to the vets.

MoorlandMooner Thu 12-Aug-21 11:55:09

kevincharley

MoorlandMooner

I feel so sorry for the dogs mentioned on this thread who are never let off the lead. No amount of on lead exercise, even with a keen walker, can compensate for the freedom to romp, roam, sniff and play with other dogs.

You can train dogs to come back, you can train them to behave and then you can let them off the lead where it is legal and safe to do so.

The Graeme Hall TV show "Dogs behaving very badly" is a great help to anyone training a dog.

Graeme Hall isn'the best example of a dog trainer. And don't get me started on Caesar Milan!

Golly, what's wrong with Graeme, he seems very kind and talented to me? Who would you suggest we look to for advice?

Silverbridge Thu 12-Aug-21 09:45:36

Re retractable leads, as well as the nuisance and danger aspect to other people I read ...

The purpose of using a lead when walking a dog is to keep the dog under control and safe. Retractable leads very often do the opposite.

They are a very bad idea from a training aspect as they actually train dogs to pull while on a lead because they learn that pulling extends the lead. ... It is much better to teach your dog to walk politely on a lead beside you without pulling.

Kate1949 Thu 12-Aug-21 09:38:00

I'm not sure why those of us who don't like/are afraid of dogs should be asked to alter our behaviour or taught/encouraged to be more comfortable with dogs. Maybe we don't want to.

Beswitched Thu 12-Aug-21 09:32:01

I agree with a pp re extendable leads. So many dog owners don't bother to retract them when around other people, or turn them into a tripping risk as they wander around the park seemingly oblivious to the fact that everyone around them, including elderly people, are having to avoid falling over the bloody lead.

I wish they could be banned.

Blondiescot Thu 12-Aug-21 09:31:09

Fiorentina51, I don't think she was "blaming" the person for screaming, merely pointing out that it's likely to make a dog react in a worse manner. It's good advice to say don't scream and don't run, as it's likely to exacerbate the situation.

fiorentina51 Thu 12-Aug-21 09:20:53

Interesting that the blame is put on the person screaming as she anticipates an attack from an out of control dog in a public place, rather than on the idiot dog owner.
Typical blinkered, selfish dog owner attitude.

Comments from some dog owners such as it is easy to train dogs to come to heel when off lead, ignore the fact that large numbers of dogs are NOT well trained. That is the whole point of this thread.
Until the current regulations are strengthened and rigorously enforced I cannot see an improvement in the situation.

Yabbie Thu 12-Aug-21 09:16:53

Thank heavens I own a farm.
My dogs are required to keep me in sight and come when called. They understand "wait" to mean that they must not go through a particular gate or fence and that's about it. They're only ever on lead at the vets' place.
They're well trained and free to run, play and eat disgusting finds.

Dinahmo Thu 12-Aug-21 00:09:25

Kryptonite

The only dog I was never afraid of was our own. She also did not like other dogs either, especially coming up and sniffing round etc. I always kept her on a lead when other people were around unlike most people I encounter. The few who do put their dogs back on their leads when they see me, I always thank for their consideration. I have been known to reroute my walk if I see a dog loose in front of their property, especially Jack Russells! A dog once made a beeline for me on a huge beach and ignored it's owners shouts to come back. I braced myself for the attack and screamed, arms over head before impact. The owner did not apologise at all. Thankfully, the dog didn't attack me, just jumped up and scared me. Yes, people are so selfish.

Screaming at the dog was one of the worst things you could have done as you would have further agitated that dog.

delilah Wed 11-Aug-21 23:59:20

Oh my word. You cannot be serious.
Few things are more annoying that Doreens and Maureens still in their 70 yr old prefects' garb preaching at me and my dog. Even had to instruct scared local headteacher to initiate dog friendly lessons in his school...
Children should be at ease with puppies from their infancy and this sniffy whiffy attitude won't help.

kevincharley Wed 11-Aug-21 23:22:17

MoorlandMooner

I feel so sorry for the dogs mentioned on this thread who are never let off the lead. No amount of on lead exercise, even with a keen walker, can compensate for the freedom to romp, roam, sniff and play with other dogs.

You can train dogs to come back, you can train them to behave and then you can let them off the lead where it is legal and safe to do so.

The Graeme Hall TV show "Dogs behaving very badly" is a great help to anyone training a dog.

Graeme Hall isn'the best example of a dog trainer. And don't get me started on Caesar Milan!

MoorlandMooner Wed 11-Aug-21 22:27:52

Alioop

MoorlandMooner I have my rescue now for 3 years and have trained her well, she knew nothing, but her recall is still zero. She slipped her harness one day and took off towards the road, totally ignoring me, but thankfully a man caught her.
She was found as a stray in the streets, the most nervous wee critter you could meet,she would run if a paper bag flew down the street and jumps at every noise she hears. She gets to meet other dogs at a dog exercise centre near me and one of my leads when we are out is a horse training lead that is really, really long. I also have a decent sized back garden that my friends come to with their dogs to have a run around together.
You may feel sorry for her not really getting the freedom you think she deserves, but compared to the life that little mite had before me I think she's doing ok.

Nobody knows our own dog as well as we do and it sounds as though you know your dear pup very well. You are giving her a wonderful life and she's lucky to have found you.

My dog was a rescue dog too...scared of everything and everyone. It's a joy to help them build their confidence and see them thrive isn't it.

Kryptonite Wed 11-Aug-21 22:18:37

The only dog I was never afraid of was our own. She also did not like other dogs either, especially coming up and sniffing round etc. I always kept her on a lead when other people were around unlike most people I encounter. The few who do put their dogs back on their leads when they see me, I always thank for their consideration. I have been known to reroute my walk if I see a dog loose in front of their property, especially Jack Russells! A dog once made a beeline for me on a huge beach and ignored it's owners shouts to come back. I braced myself for the attack and screamed, arms over head before impact. The owner did not apologise at all. Thankfully, the dog didn't attack me, just jumped up and scared me. Yes, people are so selfish.

Alioop Wed 11-Aug-21 22:12:16

MoorlandMooner I have my rescue now for 3 years and have trained her well, she knew nothing, but her recall is still zero. She slipped her harness one day and took off towards the road, totally ignoring me, but thankfully a man caught her.
She was found as a stray in the streets, the most nervous wee critter you could meet,she would run if a paper bag flew down the street and jumps at every noise she hears. She gets to meet other dogs at a dog exercise centre near me and one of my leads when we are out is a horse training lead that is really, really long. I also have a decent sized back garden that my friends come to with their dogs to have a run around together.
You may feel sorry for her not really getting the freedom you think she deserves, but compared to the life that little mite had before me I think she's doing ok.

Candelle Wed 11-Aug-21 20:45:35

I love dogs and used to own one but became progressively ill and only when he died was it realised that I was allergic to him (despite childhood negative allergy results for 'dog'!) so, no more dogs for me.

However, could I please raise a point regarding some leads - but I am probably in the minority here.... A few years ago, very thin flexible leads which expand from a cartridge to great lengths arrived. These leads can be dangerous: I have seen dog owners walking on the left hand side of a path whilst talking on their mobiles. They forget that they have let their dog's lead out to its maximum and the dog has wandered off to the right - the lead is now stretched across the path.

I have seen a couple, busy speaking to each other and a cyclist, almost tripped by these leads from non-attentive owners.

Apart from the obvious dangers of these leads used like this, all dogs should be on a lead unless in an area where it is expressly stated that dogs are permitted to roam free.