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Brining a turkey?

(18 Posts)
phoenix Sat 01-Dec-18 18:57:17

Evening, sending every good wish to you.

Today's Telegraph Saturday section contains suggestions (orders/instructions) for food preparation in the run up to Christmas.

Now, some of it is obviously complete codswallop, ( "pigs in blankets, allow 1 chipolata and a small rasher of bacon per person" shockshock Is she having a laugh? I do at least 12 for just Me P and I, otherwise there wouldn't be enough to go with the cold collation on Boxing Day (let alone for surreptitious fridge raiding blush)

Anyway, to the turkey, she says she would never cook one without brining it first.

I know this is popular in the USA, but have you ever, or would you?

But loath to divert from my usual method, especially after last year when I followed a recommendation on here for the Phil Vickery method, which ended up with having to manage with 3 burners, and buying a new hob!tchconfused

phoenix Sat 01-Dec-18 18:58:27

Oh for an edit facility!

Welshwife Sat 01-Dec-18 19:39:47

I have been afraid to do that as I thought putting salt on meat made it tough. Do you think it is anything to do with the chlorination they do.?
At the moment most lettuce has been withdrawn from sale in USA to do with contaminated water.

Jalima1108 Sat 01-Dec-18 19:49:46

I think that Nigella recommended soaking the turkey in a bucket, it may have been in brine, can't remember.

pigs in blankets, allow 1 chipolata and a small rasher of bacon per person They obviously are not inviting my DGC to Christmas dinner!
and what about leftovers?

Jalima1108 Sat 01-Dec-18 19:51:36

www.nigella.com/recipes/spiced-and-superjuicy-roast-turkey
I saw her doing it on tv one year but have never tried it.

morethan2 Sun 02-Dec-18 07:47:38

I’ve used that method for the last five or six years and I’m told by the family it’s the best moistest turkey they’ve ever eaten. Last year one of my DiL family who dislikes turkey but has one slice every year just because it’s tradition ate platefuls and got on everyone’s nerves by saying “this is really lovely”. If your using nigella’s recipe then you really have to keep your nerve during cooking because she advocates cooking it very very quickly. I find it a bit unnerving. The only problem I have is I’m reluctant to make gravy or stock because of the salt from brining. I’d appreciate others advice about that if anyone knows. The other problem is I’m now expected to cook the turkey every year. I’m trying to think of an excuse to get out of it this year but that a problem for another thread

Izabella Sun 02-Dec-18 16:27:48

I have no idea but the best turkey I have ever had in my life was in Texas one Thanksgiving. It was deep fried in next to no time. Delicious.

Daddima Sun 02-Dec-18 16:52:34

I always brine a chicken in sugar and salt ( I don’t do turkey dinner any more), and I’m always pleased with the result. I imagine it would work with a turkey also.

phoenix Sun 02-Dec-18 17:02:56

Many thanks for the replies, much appreciated.

morethan2, so you mean the actual spiced etc version, or something else?

(Sorry if I'm being dim tchblush)

morethan2 Sun 02-Dec-18 19:56:25

phoenix it’s the spice one. It’s not as complicated in RL as it looks on the page. I’m not sure all those spices are really needed, I think it the brining that keeps the flesh moist and soft. Year before last I had to take it in the car to my sons. It was covered in foil, lots of towels wrapped round it then placed in a cardboard box for over an hour and it was better than ever. That made me wonder if its resting the bird that’s the trick. I realise I’ve just made a easy question more complicated...sorry

phoenix Mon 03-Dec-18 19:04:12

Thanks, morethan although taking my turkey for a trundle around the highways and byways might be a step too far!

Now need to get up the courage to try it, after last year's disaster (see OP) I swore that it was back to Delia.

Jalima1108 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:19:44

If your using nigella’s recipe then you really have to keep your nerve during cooking because she advocates cooking it very very quickly

So don't stuff it!!

Jalima1108 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:20:08

in fact, don't stuff it anyway, unless you just shove a few flavourings in the cavity.

Jalima1108 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:20:46

in fact, don't stuff it anyway, unless you use a few flavourings in the cavity.

Jalima1108 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:21:08

that didn't post so I posted again

confused

morethan2 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:28:02

Stuffing? That’s not in the recipe so I cook the stuffing separately

Jalima1108 Mon 03-Dec-18 19:29:21

No, I know, I was just saying - some people may stuff it anyway but if it's being cooked quickly that isn't a good idea.

oh dear, just thought I was helping

morethan2 Mon 03-Dec-18 21:15:45

Oh I didn’t think you were criticising me Jamilma I just thought you were warning me ,but your right to advise others I don’t want food poisoning on my conscious. Goes to show how the written word can be misconstrued. 🤝