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Problem tree.

(147 Posts)
kircubbin2000 Thu 07-Feb-19 21:40:18

My neighbour has complained for several years about a large oak tree behind 3 of the houses.All the leaves fall into his garden but the tree is between all the fences and even the council can't say who owns it. He has nagged so much that the lady behind me has agreed to cut it down and he may pay her something towards the £1000 bill.I like the tree but don't want a row but now I feel I should give her some money too. What do you think.

watermeadow Fri 08-Feb-19 20:31:06

As far as I can see every “tree surgeon” will happily cut down every tree and say it was diseased, or will mutilate it so it looks sad and spoiled for the rest of its life.
So many people buy a house then demand the removal of the trees which were there before they moved in.

Jalima1108 Fri 08-Feb-19 21:10:51

Re-reading the OP, it is not the tree that is the problem, it is the neighbour who wants it chopped down who is the problem.

janeainsworth Fri 08-Feb-19 21:24:03

As far as I can see every “tree surgeon” will happily cut down every tree and say it was diseased, or will mutilate it so it looks sad and spoiled for the rest of its life

That’s simply not true, watermeadow.
It’s true that sometimes trees are spoiled by inexpert hacking, but a properly qualified tree surgeon, as anno says, can shape a tree and make it even more beautiful.
I have several trees in my garden and for years was very reluctant to do anything to them.

Then a tree surgeon was recommended to me and when he had finished you couldn’t tell anything had been done to them, except that they had a better, more contained shape.

PECS Fri 08-Feb-19 21:29:35

I am guilty of removing a tree from my garden when we moved here..a 35' Leylandii. As a result my neighbour no longer has to have the light on in her sitting room all day. I have planted three new trees to replace it. An established oak however, is a different matter!

FountainPen Fri 08-Feb-19 21:40:11

I agree with janeainsworth. Anyone with a chainsaw can call themselves a tree surgeon but there are also, thankfully, highly knowledgeable and skilled operators with professional qualifications. Standards are overseen by the Arboricultural Association.

www.trees.org.uk/Help-Advice/Public/Why-should-I-use-an-ARB-Approved-Contractor

I have a beautiful oak tree in my front garden which is over 140 years old. Yes, I get random chancers knocking on my door asking if I want them to do work on it but I have an ARB certified surgeon shape it every two years. Not cheap but if a job's worth doing ...

Grammaretto Fri 08-Feb-19 21:55:06

We've had to take down diseased elm and other trees over the years because our sloping garden is mostly old woodland.
In my experience, far from being eager to take trees down, tree surgeons are very careful to make sure no birds are nesting and they will leave a high stump for habitat.
We have been told by the tree surgeons that "neighbours" often ask them to take down another tree which is shading them etc while they are at it.

oldgaijin Sat 09-Feb-19 08:14:54

Check to see if there's a TPO on it and if there isn't, get one on it, FAST!
A good tree surgeon could raise the crown...an oak can host over 400 species of wildlife, so why destroy it?

janeainsworth Sat 09-Feb-19 08:40:50

Thank you for the link fountainpen.
It reminds me of the quote
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do a job, wait till you hire the amateur."
Red Adair

NotSpaghetti Sat 09-Feb-19 09:06:17

I asked my council to put a TPO on a beautiful lime tree which was under threat.
IF it's visible from a "public space" ie a relatively well used road, and if it enhances the area or adds character to the area they will do it.
Just call them.
My council didn't say who had called as it was a neighbour, and came out quickly as I said I believed it was under immediate threat.

Tweedle24 Sat 09-Feb-19 09:06:55

You can ask he Council about putting a preservation order on the tree. They can do that regardless of the owner if the land.

Jaycee5 Sat 09-Feb-19 09:13:31

It could cause serious subsidence problems if it is removed. That would end up costing a lot more than £1,000 for the houses affected or months of arguing with insurance companies. If it was willingly cut down, they might refuse to pay out.
Some people like to moan. It is a shame that someone has given in to it.
I don't think she should pay on her own but I wouldn't contribute if I didn't want the tree cut down.

FlorenceFlower Sat 09-Feb-19 09:14:50

Oaks are wonderful trees, hopefully your neighbour can be persuaded to have it trimmed at the right time of year. Its illegal to disturb birds while they are nesting or irritating to nest.

Can you all club together to get him an electric leaf blower?

🍂 🍃 🍁

LinkyPinky Sat 09-Feb-19 09:18:38

This tree should not be felled because it is inconvenient to somebody. Trees are precious. If it were me, I would get a TPA put on it immediately to allow time to try to find out whose responsibility it is. See the RHA on how to do this.
‘If you wish to protect a tree in your area, write to the Planning Authority stating your reasons, and include a map to aid identification. An immediate, temporary (six month) TPO can be put in place by the Local Planning Authority. The Authority would then inform neighbours and interested parties. Any objections must be received within 28 days. After six months, the temporary TPO could be confirmed and made permanent, or allowed to lapse. Local residents have the chance to raise objections in that time.’

Stansgran Sat 09-Feb-19 09:19:36

JaneA I wish I had known that quote when newly arrived I listened to a neighbour who nagged us to chop trees down. I paid a chance caller- believed him when he said he was working in the neighbourhood and he and his child helper chopped down a leylandii caused damage to other trees and other neighbour's were burgled that night- tiny windows in bathrooms left open that a child could get through. I have learnt my lesson . But don't chop an oak down . It could be there when the houses have gone.

quizqueen Sat 09-Feb-19 09:20:22

Ignore your neighbour's nagging, he is a fool. The tree was there long before him so tell him to move if he is offended by it and, while you're at it, ask him where he gets his oxygen from!

jaylucy Sat 09-Feb-19 09:22:14

Suggest you all club together to buy one of those garden vac things! If his only problem is that he gets leaves in his garden, I'd suggest that he moves somewhere that is surrounded in asphalt and concrete!

Toots Sat 09-Feb-19 09:25:12

Very puzzling why your immediate neighbour would be bullied into paying for this tree to be cut down when it's not clear who owns it... and I'm sure the council could find that out with a bit more effort.. Land Registry, as others have pointed out, for a start. I'd tell the bully to stop moaning about it if he's not going to sort the problem himself..and I totally agree with everyone else that it's sacrilege to cut down a healthy tree that is not a threat to life and limb..my son's neighbours had a similar problem and used a good tree surgeon to solve the problem.

Rosina Sat 09-Feb-19 09:25:43

How moronic of someone to want to cut down a tree because once a year he has to clear up leaves. Does he not know that without trees we are well and truly sunk - I don't know another source of oxygen, offhand. This lazy person probably wants to concrete everything - no grass to cut, no weeds to pull up, but of course no greenery, no sound of wind in the leaves - makes you want to weep. Years ago we lived in a road lined with cherry trees; in the spring it was absolutely wonderful, and the sight of the shimmering pink blossom against a blue sky is still a picture in my mind's eye. One neighbour tried to get the two trees outside his house removed because he 'almost slipped over on the cherries that fell off'. Too lazy to sweep, he wanted the glorious trees felled. Luckily we had a reasonable person on the local authority who apparently told him to buy a broom.

Toots Sat 09-Feb-19 09:29:51

Kircubbin20 please let us know the outcome, I'm intrigued now, and feel sorry for the poor tree!.

Blackcat3 Sat 09-Feb-19 09:32:21

If there’s a preservation order on it the tree surgeon and the instigator get a huge fine. Cutting down a large oak is beyond crazy when you think how long it took to grow. Most reputable tree surgeons won’t touch a tree of which the owner is not known. Unless you want to see it go...or want to preserve it....don’t get involved would be my advice...same to the other neighbours.....the one who wants it removed should deal with it and the aftermath.....personally I’d just get a rake! Leaf litter is a valuable soil nutrient.

Toots Sat 09-Feb-19 09:34:20

Rosina..love that story!. My in laws lived in such a road too and as you say it's glorious when all the blossom is out...did that silly man think that if he cut down the trees outside his property the blossom from the other trees would bypass that bit?... 😄

jenpax Sat 09-Feb-19 09:36:23

Agree with all here, cutting down an oak tree is an appalling act of vandalism!

Chris4159 Sat 09-Feb-19 09:47:39

Why on earth is your neighbour paying for it, if he is the one moaning. Is she elderly and living on her own? Sounds like bullying tactics. I agree with everyone else you can't just cut it down without finding out legal owner.

ReadyMeals Sat 09-Feb-19 09:49:17

I should add you can't just cut down a tree that DOES belong to you. If its trunk is fatter than 6 inches you have to check with that you're allowed to, especially for a tree like an oak which tend to be under preservation orders even on private land

tickingbird Sat 09-Feb-19 09:49:37

I’m afraid I can’t understand how this man is getting on everyone’s nerves with his complaining. If the tree doesn’t belong to any of you who is he complaining to? The other lady really should not be paying to have this tree removed and, as others have said, you can’t just go around cutting down Oak trees. I should seriously advise the other lady not to go ahead and point the troublesome neighbour towards the land registry or maybe do a bit of searching yourself and then pass on the information to him. Don’t be browbeaten. That tree has been there a lot longer than him!