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Christmas

What my 13 year old GS has requested for Christmas

(176 Posts)
Gin Sat 03-Dec-22 12:19:41

I asked my son for ideas for a Christmas present for teenage GS. I have just heard he wants a bottle of Prada Ocean, a cologne or aftershave in my language. The smallest size cost about £45! Am I being a meanie refusing to buy it? He is turning into a label conscious lad only wanting expensive named brands. I feel it is a trait not to be encouraged or are most youngsters like this? He is my youngest GS by many years, am I out of touch?

Zoejory Sat 03-Dec-22 12:22:36

If you can afford it then I can't see any problem.

GrannyGravy13 Sat 03-Dec-22 12:22:42

You asked for gift ideas, your son has told you.

Now you have to decide if you want to give your GS a Christmas Gift he will like and use or give him something which you think is appropriate which could remain under his bed for the foreseeable future.

Grandmabatty Sat 03-Dec-22 12:23:02

Would you normally spend that amount? If so, then buy it for him. But nothing else. If you wouldn't spend that amount, tell your ds that it's out of your budget. My son was very much into labels and I encouraged a part time job so he could afford them. He grew up to still like expensive things but also is a big charity giver.

Oldbat1 Sat 03-Dec-22 12:24:31

We give gc money and they can buy what they want or put it towards something. We are not poor but we only give £30 per person in cash in an envelope. Quite enough I feel as they are all quite comfortable and don’t want for anything.

MissAdventure Sat 03-Dec-22 12:26:14

I think its wise to buy them what they want, rather than what you think they should want.

It's the best use of my money, I always think.

I've lost count of the amount of worm farms, scientific experiments, books and educational games I've had to donate, over the years, so I'd rather buy something they want.

Witzend Sat 03-Dec-22 12:28:44

If I could afford it, I’d buy it, because I’d want to give him what he actually wants. If I couldn’t, I’d give him cash towards it - maybe with something very little to open.

I’m afraid it’s a sad fact that teens are often very brand conscious.

NotAGran55 Sat 03-Dec-22 12:35:43

If it is within your budget I would most definitely buy it for him. Why as what he would like otherwise.
He is a young man developing his own style and a luxury item is most appropriate as a gift I would have thought.

(Being brand conscious isn’t a new thing. I wouldn’t have been seen dead in anything but Levi jeans when I was a teenager)

SpringyChicken Sat 03-Dec-22 12:35:45

You aren't going to change him by giving him something more worthy but don't buy it if it costs more than you want to spend.

NotAGran55 Sat 03-Dec-22 12:36:08

*ask not as

Blossoming Sat 03-Dec-22 12:36:59

It’s a fragrance and he likes it. I wouldn’t thank anyone for buying me a cheap perfume because the ones I like are more expensive. If you can afford it then buy it. If you feel it’s too expensive then tell your son you can’t afford it but will give him some cash so he can put it towards buying it for himself.

sodapop Sat 03-Dec-22 13:07:14

My daughter did that Blossoming if the children wanted more expensive branded clothing etc she would give them the money for the basic item and they had to fund the rest themselves. They have grown up to be budget conscious and careful how they spend their money.

JaneJudge Sat 03-Dec-22 13:09:03

If you can't afford to buy it, you could offer to give some money towards it?

JaneJudge Sat 03-Dec-22 13:09:30

Blossoming

It’s a fragrance and he likes it. I wouldn’t thank anyone for buying me a cheap perfume because the ones I like are more expensive. If you can afford it then buy it. If you feel it’s too expensive then tell your son you can’t afford it but will give him some cash so he can put it towards buying it for himself.

sorry I have just repeated you! grin

icanhandthemback Sat 03-Dec-22 13:15:58

When my children or grandchildren ask for expensive items, I just give them some money towards it if it is beyond my budget. I think it has a greater chance of them seeing the value of money when the whole lot is spent on one thing but at the same time gives them what they want if they are that determined.

V3ra Sat 03-Dec-22 13:45:15

sodapop

My daughter did that Blossoming if the children wanted more expensive branded clothing etc she would give them the money for the basic item and they had to fund the rest themselves. They have grown up to be budget conscious and careful how they spend their money.

Same here when my three were teenagers and wanted designer trainers. I'd give them the cost of what to my mind was a reasonable pair and they'd add birthday or Christmas money from their grandparents to buy the pair they wanted.
Everyone was happy 😊

eazybee Sat 03-Dec-22 13:51:57

If £45 is the amount you normally spend I would give it to him; you asked what he wants and if it is within the Christmas budget give it to him. You haven't been on a residential trip with a group of eleven year old boys when they 'dress for dinner'; the smell of Lynx and Brut is so strong you can taste it. Prada Ocean sounds better quality, therefore maybe more subtle?
Didn't you long for an expensive perfume when you were thirteen?

Calendargirl Sat 03-Dec-22 13:55:53

My own son would probably have said “How much do you want to spend on him?” and depending on what I replied, would have told me about the cologne, or then said give him some cash to put towards it.

It does seem a lot and extravagant I agree, but as others have said, no use giving him something he basically doesn’t want and will never use, just to prove a point.

Teacheranne Sat 03-Dec-22 13:57:40

Like many people here, I also give money or vouchers at Christmas - together with a small gift to open on Christmas Day. So if my nephew wanted this particular aftershave, he could buy it from the money I give him.

I wonder though how other people take inflation into account? Giving say £30 to a grandchild would have been a decent amount ten years ago but nowadays might not be so generous. I have given my niece and nephew £50 each for about five years but this year I’m giving them £75. They are 16 and 20 so pretty much grown up and I consider them more as my grandchildren as I’m a lot older than their mum, my sister, and I used to look after then in the school holidays.

Do other people increase money gifts or, like my grandparents, stick to the same amount year on year?

MissAdventure Sat 03-Dec-22 14:00:34

I vary, year to year.

It's my money, so I can do what I like with it, is my motto.

I don't set unneessary rules for myself.

MerylStreep Sat 03-Dec-22 14:02:01

Gin
You asked the question am I out of touch
IMO, sorry to say you are 😊

BlueBelle Sat 03-Dec-22 14:13:09

Of course if that’s what he would like and it’s within your budget How lovely that a 13 year old is not wanting to smell sweaty and mucky
If you buy him a box of Lego or some socks will he be happy or will you have wasted your money
I see nice enough undies but my grandson wants Calvin Klines and certain colognes what’s the point of asking if you want to buy something different
Sorry Gin but yes you’re a bit out of touch

mokryna Sat 03-Dec-22 14:14:53

Both my teenage DGDs asked for Perfume. I personally do not agree and asked my DD, she said it was their choice.
Luckily Black Friday and picking the size which fitted what I was prepared to pay. I would have spent more but I didn’t really agree. There must be a lot of advertising on the things they look at online is all I can say.
Offers are still online if you can manage to buy that way, with -30% off, have a look.

Kate1949 Sat 03-Dec-22 14:34:46

We buy what is asked for if we can afford it.

M0nica Sat 03-Dec-22 14:38:03

If you cannot afford it, or it is way above your normal price, just say that it is out of your price range.

In future ask him what he would like, with in a certain budget £30 for example.