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Nightingale hospitals being readied for use

(58 Posts)
GagaJo Fri 01-Jan-21 08:28:55

Nightingale hospitals across England are being "readied" for use if needed as COVID-19 patient numbers rise.

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said the military was standing by to staff Nightingale hospitals if the NHS exceeded its capacity of critical care beds.

"We are on, I think, 17,000 ventilator beds currently being used, of a capacity of 21,000.

"If it starts to tip over there, then of course you'll see those Nightingales being more active and, yes, we have a number of medical staff."

He said the Army currently had 5,000 personnel deployed in the COVID-19 response.

uk.yahoo.com/news/covid-19-nightingale-hospitals-being-130400826.html

BlueBelle Fri 01-Jan-21 08:34:56

I thought they d begun pulling the London one down !!!

Lilypops Fri 01-Jan-21 08:36:39

Frightening statistics at the start of 2021,

Genty Fri 01-Jan-21 08:47:09

On reading the news its saying the hospitals are struggling, patients are being treated in the back of ambulances in a long queue outside hospitals as theres no room in the hospitals! Why arent covid patients taken directly to the nightingale hospitals to be treated. Its appalling that they are not being used for the purpose they were built for. The whole situation has got out of hand, since covid started the government have been faffing around playing with our lives and playing God!!!

Whitewavemark2 Fri 01-Jan-21 08:49:01

There are sufficient staff. There isn’t sufficient staff for the NHS, so how can they possibly be staffed?

Whitewavemark2 Fri 01-Jan-21 08:49:39

Not are should read isnt

Genty Fri 01-Jan-21 08:54:46

There would be sufficient staff if the hospitals werent at full capacity with all the covd patients.

GagaJo Fri 01-Jan-21 08:59:20

I have to admit, I felt a sense of relief when the army were mentioned. I really don't know why they haven't been deployed already.

Esspee Fri 01-Jan-21 09:00:49

The new hospitals should have been used from the start in an attempt to keep our established hospitals working as normal.

It is a disgrace that so many have had treatment delayed. How many will have their lives shortened as a result?

Dwmxwg Fri 01-Jan-21 09:01:10

The military medical staff are already part of the NHS. My niece works in A&E in a large hospital. Last night they were very busy, all patients COVID related illnesses and they were 7 staff members down. Not quite sure where these “extra” drs and nurses will come from

Charleygirl5 Fri 01-Jan-21 09:06:30

I heard on the news late last night that 4000 beds out of 6000 have been prepared at the London Nightingale but I do not know if anybody has been admitted yet.

GagaJo Fri 01-Jan-21 09:10:33

Dwmxwg

The military medical staff are already part of the NHS. My niece works in A&E in a large hospital. Last night they were very busy, all patients COVID related illnesses and they were 7 staff members down. Not quite sure where these “extra” drs and nurses will come from

Which is why medics should have had the vaccine first.

GagaJo Fri 01-Jan-21 09:18:40

NHS staff sickness / isolation is just adding to the problem. We need to vaccinate them first for our own good.

'Hospitals and ambulance services are struggling with a staff sickness rate two to three times higher than usual, as growing numbers of NHS workers fall ill or go into isolation amid a huge surge in Covid infections.

Absence rates in some hospitals are now between 8% and 12%, versus the health service’s normal level of 4%, just as the NHS comes under the greatest strain in its history.'

Iam64 Fri 01-Jan-21 09:32:32

And - look at the images on line of huge crowds in London last night.

growstuff Fri 01-Jan-21 19:15:04

GagaJo

Dwmxwg

The military medical staff are already part of the NHS. My niece works in A&E in a large hospital. Last night they were very busy, all patients COVID related illnesses and they were 7 staff members down. Not quite sure where these “extra” drs and nurses will come from

Which is why medics should have had the vaccine first.

There aren't enough vaccines. We've run out.

Whitewavemark2 Fri 01-Jan-21 19:16:54

Who is to staff these hospitals. Does anyone know?

growstuff Fri 01-Jan-21 19:17:23

Genty

There would be sufficient staff if the hospitals werent at full capacity with all the covd patients.

I don't understand the logic of this. Transferring patients to Nightingale hospitals would mean diverting staff from normal hospitals, so there would be even fewer staff and empty beds.

GagaJo Fri 01-Jan-21 19:25:27

I know we have run out Growstuff. But it should have been medics first. And should be medics first when we get our next supply.

growstuff Fri 01-Jan-21 19:26:24

Whitewavemark2

Who is to staff these hospitals. Does anyone know?

Apparently, military personnel are to be used. They're going to be very busy, as they're also supposed to be doing the tests in schools. Hope nobody declares war.

growstuff Fri 01-Jan-21 19:26:40

Or needs help with flooding.

Whitewavemark2 Fri 01-Jan-21 19:28:41

3 years ago, the government was told in gory detail how unprepared the country was in the event of a pandemic, and were advised in full detail what was needed to be done.

They did nothing.

growstuff Fri 01-Jan-21 19:31:20

Pandemics are only for those pesky foreigners who eat exotic animals and/or hug and kiss like Italians.

FarNorth Fri 01-Jan-21 19:32:02

A lot of nursing doesn't require special medical skills - it's to do with keeping patients clean and comfortable.
If the army is training personnel now, to do this work, that could take some strain off qualified nursing staff.

FarNorth Fri 01-Jan-21 19:33:25

And only a couple of weeks ago, our governments thought that 5 days of eased restrictions would be a good idea.

welbeck Fri 01-Jan-21 19:33:47

i would imagine that any military personnel with experience of intensive care are already being used in the nhs.
it takes 40-50 specialist staff to safely look after 10 ITU patients.
the current hosps are already under-staffed; how can they divert staff to nightingales.