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Vaccine passports, what do you think?

(52 Posts)
maddyone Fri 10-Sep-21 15:08:39

Just that really, what do you think about vaccine passports, as they are much in the news just now? I don’t have a problem with them, but what do others think?

Aveline Fri 10-Sep-21 15:28:56

I don't have a problem with them personally but I don't think I'll need one in my restricted life.
My cats have vaccination certificates for if they have to go anywhere...

theworriedwell Fri 10-Sep-21 15:33:43

I applied for paper certificates for myself and DH as my phone is too old for the nhs app. I can't see the issue, the paper folds up and is in the back of my purse with my driving licence.

GrannyGravy13 Fri 10-Sep-21 15:46:16

A vaccinated person can catch Covid albeit with lesser symptoms, they can be a symptomatic and pass Covid onto others so personally I cannot see the point.

AGAA4 Fri 10-Sep-21 16:11:56

My grandson is starting at university soon and will no doubt be going into clubs, bars etc with hundreds of other students.

I think vaccine passports in this case would be a good idea.
Double vaccinated students are very unlikely to become ill enough to need hospital treatment and the last thing the university cities need is an influx of ill students into their hospitals.

Charleygirl5 Fri 10-Sep-21 16:15:16

I think it is an excellent idea. I doubt very much if I will need one unless one may need one to enter a cafe or restaurant. I do feel sorry for those who, for medical reasons cannot be vaccinated.

Galaxy Fri 10-Sep-21 16:16:29

But what purpose does it serve.

maddyone Fri 10-Sep-21 16:55:08

GrannyGravy13

A vaccinated person can catch Covid albeit with lesser symptoms, they can be a symptomatic and pass Covid onto others so personally I cannot see the point.

A very valid point, but I still come down, on balance, in favour.

maddyone Fri 10-Sep-21 16:55:57

I’ll need my vaccination passport when I fly to Greece next week.

Kim19 Fri 10-Sep-21 16:59:52

I've just received mine. Comprehensive document which I think may be difficult to counterfeit. Don't know if I'll ever need to use it but seemed like a good idea to have one. Who knows, I might just go clubbing up in Scotland! Long way for a night out.

Ladyleftfieldlover Fri 10-Sep-21 17:04:01

I haven’t a problem with this at all. I remember years ago carrying a yellow card inside my passport which listed the jabs I’d had to go to places like Tanzania: cholera, yellow fever etc. I wasn’t worried about an attack on my civil liberties. It was simply proof that I had been inoculated against a dangerous disease. Obviously those who can’t have the covid jab for medical reasons would carry a similar proof detailing why they haven’t been jabbed. I also agree that medical and care staff should be jabbed. I bet a lot of the Anti-Vaxer types were innoculated against diphtheria, polio etc., when they were children.

Jaxjacky Fri 10-Sep-21 17:49:07

No problem with it, we both have ours on our phones.

silverlining48 Fri 10-Sep-21 17:55:32

I have no problem with this, we already have something on paper and think it’s sensible for everyone to have them, particularly might encourage the young to get vaccinated if they are needed to get into clubs.

BlueBelle Fri 10-Sep-21 18:00:14

Well if they are well used as the vaccination certificate I was told by my airline I needed for flying they ll be useless
I put them on my phone and had a paper copy as well and filled in a locator form again printed out and neither airport coming or going asked to see either
They didn’t even ask if I was vaccinated, they asked nothing in fact it was no different to normal apart from wearing a mask !

Mollygo Fri 10-Sep-21 18:10:22

Not a problem for us. My GD thinks it’s a good idea too. My anti-vax relations think they’re a rubbish idea, but they have cancelled their holiday rather than get the vaccine.
BlueBelle, you’re right about them only being any good if they’re used.

varian Fri 10-Sep-21 18:32:47

When we went on holiday to Jersey this summer we had to state that we had been double jabbed before we travelled and on arrival showed our vaccine cards (issued on the date of the first jab then endorsed with the date of the second jab) to confirm that. What's the problem?

sodapop Fri 10-Sep-21 18:50:51

We use ours all the time here in France. I have to say though that not everyone asks for them which is odd. My husband picked up a KFC today ( don't judge me ) from inside the restaurant and despite signs on the door no one asked for his Pass Sanitaire.

halfpint1 Fri 10-Sep-21 19:10:35

Well sodapop I can't get a simple coffee at mcdo's without showing mine, very keen!

Scones Fri 10-Sep-21 20:33:00

GrannyGravy13

A vaccinated person can catch Covid albeit with lesser symptoms, they can be a symptomatic and pass Covid onto others so personally I cannot see the point.

A agree totally with this comment. I haven't seen this point addressed anywhere.

Galaxy Fri 10-Sep-21 20:41:40

I asked for the purpose but no one has replied.

Scones Fri 10-Sep-21 21:03:59

Nobody has answered your question Galaxy here or in the media. I've heard no justification for vaccine passports from any authority - medical, government or otherwise.

Also a negative test is seen as an indicator that you do not have covid and can access venues, but it is only as good as the moment it was taken. The very next person you meet might give you the virus. I've not seen that dealt with anywhere either.

I've been vaccinated and so I suppose I have my passport. As far as I can tell I might be as contagious as the next person.

flaxwoven Fri 10-Sep-21 21:23:24

We've both put it on our phones and also printed off a copy. Rumour has it everyone might need it for large gatherings and theatres from October. My husband needs it for a conference, they have requested it even though it's not law yet. The purpose? Yes, you can still pass on the virus unknowingly if you are double jabbed, (and still catch it) but if the person you sit next to in the theatre or large gathering etc. contracts the virus, they may not get it so badly. That's how I understand it. I can't see the problem.

halfpint1 Fri 10-Sep-21 21:31:57

In France the idea is that if you don't have one you can only eat out or go for entertainment with a healthpass or a very recent test result
It has increased the number of vaccinations tremendously
Sodapop,you don't need to be asked to show it if you are picking up a takeaway only if your derriere parks itself on a seat.😀

Teacheranne Fri 10-Sep-21 21:39:36

If you are vaccinated and in a theatre where everyone else is also vaccinated, then yes, you can still pass on Covid to someone else but that person is less likely to require hospital treatment or to die. So I guess it’s about reducing and lowering the spread of Covid.

That’s how I think anyway.

Scones Fri 10-Sep-21 21:43:46

flaxwoven

We've both put it on our phones and also printed off a copy. Rumour has it everyone might need it for large gatherings and theatres from October. My husband needs it for a conference, they have requested it even though it's not law yet. The purpose? Yes, you can still pass on the virus unknowingly if you are double jabbed, (and still catch it) but if the person you sit next to in the theatre or large gathering etc. contracts the virus, they may not get it so badly. That's how I understand it. I can't see the problem.

Yes, you can still pass on the virus unknowingly if you are double jabbed, (and still catch it) but if the person you sit next to in the theatre or large gathering etc. contracts the virus, they may not get it so badly.

I could be wrong, but I don't think that's how it works at all. If you are vaccinated you might not get it so badly, but your vaccination has no impact on any person to whom you pass the virus.