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Grandparenting

The aaaah! factor

(14 Posts)
Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 11:18:17

Was not sure which thread to post this on, but it should appeal to grandchildren (and grans)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fazRaJgK-ks&feature=related

How cute is that?

gillybob Fri 03-Aug-12 11:24:00

Lovely Elegran just the sort of thing my three little monkeys love to see. smile

Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 11:29:49

Here's another

www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5TDlG441gA&feature=player_detailpage

absentgrana Fri 03-Aug-12 11:31:58

Actually, I'm not very enthusiastic about people having pets that should really be living in the wild. Of courser, the little chap might well have been bred in captivity, but I don't really approve of that either, except as part of a breeding programme for endangered species. Sorry to be a wet blanket.

Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 11:43:17

Neither am I, but it was so cute!

The zoo ones are animals bred in captivity, or often rescued at airports and so on, and (at Edinburgh Zoo anyway, and most zoos now are much better at this than they used to be) are given a life as near as possible to the one in the wild and used to demonstrate animal life to ignorant visitors, and to raise funds for re-introductions and conservation projects .

Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 12:08:48

Videos from the Living Links Centre:-

Capuchin mother and baby interaction
www.youtube.com/watch?v=vt35ShFKRuk&feature=relmfu

Capuchin monkeys react to model predators
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArKLQiMSpT4&feature=relmfu

Capuchin monkey cracking nuts with a big stone
www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MgHBvp1uwk&feature=related

And this is the Living Links website itself with more videos on it
www.youtube.com/user/LivingLinksCentre

Butternut Fri 03-Aug-12 13:31:34

Elegran - You're not thinking of getting one, are you! grin

Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 14:27:28

No, grandchildren are trouble enough.

I've seen them at the zoo though and they are attractive.

Ed Zoo has a research facility with two identical troupes of capuchins and squirrel monkeys. They can change details in one environment and see how that affects their behaviour, with a control in the other group. I must emphasise that each group has a large enclosure and snug indoor quarters, and "experiment" does not, absolutely not, mean shampoo in eyes or anything like that, just observation.

JO4 Fri 03-Aug-12 15:53:37

That is just so wrong.

Elegran Fri 03-Aug-12 15:58:40

What is ?

petallus Sat 04-Aug-12 10:51:34

Just watched spider monkey vid. Oh dear! Felt uncomfortable. Don't think the monkey was having a very good time, though the human owner obviously was.

petallus Sat 04-Aug-12 10:52:02

A bit spooky!

Elegran Sat 04-Aug-12 11:27:00

I sent this having only had a quick look at it and going ahh. Have now seen it all and I agree, Petallus, keeping monkeys as pets is NOT a good thing. There was a chimp at Ed Zoo called Mickey, who came there when he was about 4 or 5 years old, after being kept as a pet by sailors. He was now too big to control. He had never learnt how to be a chimp, and was regarded by the rest of his troupe as one banana short of a square meal. He loved human attention, and would leap up and down and bang on the glass to get it. He was most useful in the group as a babysitter, as he loved to play like a youngster. Physically he was a fine animal, and had he grown up as he should, he would have graduated to be the leader, and fathered a lot of babies, but when he died at the great age of 50 none of his genes were passed on to the next generation, as he could not relate to the adult female chimps the way he should.

Monkeys are not babies. Little monkeys are used to being licked by their mothers to keep thwm clean, I can't see a human doing that for him. If one is being hand reared, then a minimal amount of washing/bathing for hygeine is fine, but that bath went on too long and the owner was enjoying it more than the monkey - though it did look happy when dried and cuddled up in the towel, glad it was over perhaps.

Those grinning faces he made were like the ones made by adult monkeys and chimps when they are threatening one another.

The other videos I have linked to were made by professionals studying animal behaviour. They do not treat them as surrogate children, and the animals lives are lived with others of their species, relating to each other as they naturally would.

petallus Sat 04-Aug-12 13:20:41

Yes, Elegran I think it was the prolonged shampooing and blow-drying that did it for me. And that nappy!

I've got a rabbit and I spent a lot of time googling how to look after it. I wouldn't subject it to all the monkey went through though it does honk a bit at times.