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Science/nature/environment

Thinking about the environment....

(15 Posts)
Daddima Tue 12-Apr-16 11:11:48

The thread about nappies made me think.I remember when I was a child there were five of us in the house, and we had one dustbin for all our rubbish. It was mostly ashes from our coal fire, and most of our rubbish was burnt, as food was wrapped in paper, and cans were few and far between! My mother shopped every day, and there was no plastic packaging. Milk came in glass bottles, as did lemonade, both of which were reused.
This makes me wonder, were the fumes from the coal fires really worse for the environment than today's "disposable" items and energy used for recycling?

whitewave Tue 12-Apr-16 11:15:39

I think if you had luved through the smog that enveliped our cities you wouks say a resounding yes. But I do take your point we are storing up potemtial problems fir future generations

whitewave Tue 12-Apr-16 11:15:59

My typinggrin

whitewave Tue 12-Apr-16 11:26:41

The EU has some excellent environmental laws that we signed up to.

grannylyn65 Tue 12-Apr-16 12:03:41

whitewave, your typing made me 😀

whitewave Tue 12-Apr-16 16:51:58

I sound like that policeman in ello 'ello

Wheniwasyourage Tue 12-Apr-16 18:34:38

Good question, although I do remember (and don't miss AT ALL) the smogs that whitewave mentions. It always amuses me that plastic bins still have a warning about putting hot ashes in them, even though it must be a temptation for very few people these days!

Daddima Tue 12-Apr-16 19:28:37

Being a country person, I don't remember much smog, but I sometimes wonder why it's necessary to have so much plastic packaging.
I also have a friend who maintains that recycling is a myth, and that everything in the various bins is tipped directly into landfill!

pompa Tue 12-Apr-16 20:31:22

Agree with Whitewave, the smog of the 60's were dreadful. being able to see only a few feet seems incredible now. The damage to buildings from sulphur pollution, acid rain, all down to coal fires and inefficient coal burning power stations. Thousands died as a direct result of the smog.

Jalima Tue 12-Apr-16 23:10:05

I think everything used to get more dirty so we must have been breathing in all that dirt and pollution in the atmosphere.

Marmark1 Wed 13-Apr-16 07:56:33

I don't remember any smog.We didn't have it here.

pompa Wed 13-Apr-16 08:11:21

news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/december/6/newsid_3251000/3251001.stm

In the smog of 1962, my mother was in hospital, I walked the 3 miles to visit her. On the way back a lorry driver asked me to walk in front on him and try to guide him into a side road so that he could abandon his lorry. this was in Enfield. I had a wet hanky over my mouth, it was black when I got home.

Lillie Wed 13-Apr-16 08:18:02

Oh yes, pompa, we walked to school in smog many a day in Enfield in the 60's. I can still "taste" it now when reminded.

pompa Wed 13-Apr-16 08:35:07

it could only have been a couple of years later that I had to abandon my dad's car at Enfield Highway and get the train back to Southbury Road. I had trouble trying to find it the next day.

annodomini Wed 13-Apr-16 09:31:07

The west wind off the sea made sure we didn't have fog in my childhood; on the east coast, we had the haar, the sea fog that suddenly engulfed the coastal towns - and still does. I missed my turning in Dundee one day, although the car almost knew its own way by that time. I remember Edinburgh smog - trying to cross the road outside Binns at the West End and having to take my life in my hands.