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Our veterans and homeless

(27 Posts)
Hildagard Wed 16-Mar-22 17:36:54

Sorry, I’m going to be a little controversial. Why haven’t the government offered the payment for housing refugees before to get our homeless veterans off the streets? Surely they should be our priority.

FannyCornforth Wed 16-Mar-22 17:45:09

Hmm. Yes, I do get it. Sad isn’t it.

Septimia Wed 16-Mar-22 17:52:01

I suppose it's partly because they come under the umbrella of the homeless generally and because some have chosen to live an unconventional life.

Neither of which means that they should be overlooked.

Germanshepherdsmum Wed 16-Mar-22 18:04:36

I think a great many of them come with emotional baggage that most people would find very hard to cope with, also drug and alcohol addictions leading to theft and perhaps violence. They need very specialist help and some have chosen that way of life. *grannyactivist would know, she works with the homeless. People fleeing from a war zone are obviously traumatised but those on the streets are, I think, a very different kettle of fish.

nandad Wed 16-Mar-22 18:22:30

What GSM said.
The two groups support needs are very different. I think that anyone taking in a homeless person would need training and support themselves. It takes someone very special to be able to do this, but I do agree with your sentiment that we do not do enough for the homeless in our country.

Septimia Wed 16-Mar-22 19:02:57

Exactly, GSM. I was maybe being too tactful.

Aveline Wed 16-Mar-22 19:11:07

I see that another 400 migrants arrived by boat today on the South coast. Not Ukrainians. How will they be accommodated?

Patsy70 Wed 16-Mar-22 20:04:01

Hildagard. Our poor veterans who are suffering PTSD, or other psychological conditions, and not being supported, is an abomination. They really should be our first priority. The public have not been invited to sponsor these poor souls. I suppose, if we are not in a position to offer accommodation, all we can do is donate to the appropriate charities.

snowberryZ Wed 16-Mar-22 20:20:44

Whenever someone suggests we help the homeless we are told that they are all drug addicts or alcoholics.
I wonder some how much is discrimination and stereotyping.

A lot of homeless are teenagers who have been kicked out because of changes at home. New partner is one example.
I remember reading once that some illnesses are more 'sexy' than others and generate more empathy from people.
I think this extends into other areas of charitable behaviour as well.
Housing a homeless person isn't as glamorous as housing a refugee from the latest world crisis
The second is way more exciting.

Galaxy Wed 16-Mar-22 20:32:01

There are a number of you on this thread expressing the same view, perhaps you could get together and help establish such a scheme.

VioletSky Wed 16-Mar-22 20:42:53

I think the government pledged over 300 million to help the homeless last year.

There are also lots of charities the public can donate too

JaneJudge Wed 16-Mar-22 20:44:46

It's because of austerity measures, cuts to services over the 12 years and the fact none of these people have had their complex emotional needs met
sad

Casdon Wed 16-Mar-22 20:52:04

Not minimising the needs of these groups, but nobody has greater urgent need than women, children and elderly people fleeing their homes because they have no choice due to war and the risk of death.

MerylStreep Wed 16-Mar-22 21:04:47

Jim Davidson called out Dominic Cumberbatch on this very subject.
I have to say we have a wonderful award winning charity here in Southend.

oodles Wed 16-Mar-22 21:13:03

There is an interesting report here by the British legion
www.britishlegion.org.uk/docs/default-source/campaigns-policy-and-research/litrev_uk_vets_homelessness.pdf?sfvrsn=110aad9f_2
It says
Only a small minority report vulnerabilities
and support needs that are unique to a
military career, such as Combat-related Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder (Johnson et al).
Research from the US has reached the same
conclusion. Rosenheck & Fontana concluded
the reasons that veterans became homeless
were multifactorial and broadly the same as
that found among the non-veteran homeless
population.
Some interesting figures here
www.wlm.org.uk/news/how-many-veterans-are-homeless-in-the-uk

lemsip Wed 16-Mar-22 21:20:26

MerylStreep

Jim Davidson called out Dominic Cumberbatch on this very subject.
I have to say we have a wonderful award winning charity here in Southend.

you mean Benedict Cumberbatch of course

Galaxy Wed 16-Mar-22 22:38:27

My rule of doing the exact opposite of what Jim Davidson does is still serving me well.

Callistemon21 Wed 16-Mar-22 23:17:28

Hildagard

Sorry, I’m going to be a little controversial. Why haven’t the government offered the payment for housing refugees before to get our homeless veterans off the streets? Surely they should be our priority.

Because the needs of homeless ex-servicemen and women are complex. There are several charities which do great work with ex-service personnel but those who need help may not always come forward or avail themselves of it.


Despite the many criticisms of this Government (and I do recognise them!) they did recently set up The Office for Veterans' Affairs to help ex-service personnel in their move to civilian life.

This Action Plan outlines the steps the government will take to support veterans from 2022 to 2024.

It builds on the work of the 2018 Strategy for our veterans.

The plan contains 5 focal points for success:

delivering a step-change in support for veterans and their families
maximising veteran employability as the key to positive life outcomes
listening, learning and addressing with compassion the historic hurt or disadvantage that sections of the veteran community have experienced
dealing with historic operations, recognising that these continue to impact on veterans
making sure veterans receive the same high standard of support, across the whole UK

The Government has committed £millions for mental health support and to charities which help veterans.

So it is not a case of one or the other - we can help refugees too.

Hildagard Thu 17-Mar-22 17:27:10

Callistemon21
Thanks for your reply, very interesting

Callistemon21 Thu 17-Mar-22 22:39:21

Hildagard

Callistemon21
Thanks for your reply, very interesting

HildegardI wasn't aware of this myself until I did a bit more investigating when I read this thread so thank you too!

foxie48 Fri 18-Mar-22 08:53:38

Just to add to this, if you rent out a room in your house you can earn up to £7,500 pa without it being taxed and if a homeless person moves in, they can claim the cost of their accommodation (provided it represents the market rent) as part of their benefits. So in effect this is actually a more generous state aid than that being given to Ukrainian refugees. I'm sure anyone wanting to offer a room in their house to someone who is homeless would be welcomed by any of the charities. Shelter would be a good place to start

Germanshepherdsmum Fri 18-Mar-22 09:07:04

I don't know how many of us would feel comfortable renting a room to a homeless person.

Galaxy Fri 18-Mar-22 09:11:15

I think particularly for women, its really obvious why it would be easier to give a room to a woman and a child rather than a man, and thats mostly what we are talking about, homelessness impacts on men much more than women.

JaneJudge Fri 18-Mar-22 09:11:38

Some towns and cities are much better at dealing with homeless people and it is all down to investment.

JaneJudge Fri 18-Mar-22 09:13:13

by dealing with, I mean investment in services and housing that is specific to assisting homeless people to live independently - with short and long term support if necessary