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I just put our delivered daily paper in the oven...

(40 Posts)
Witzend Sat 21-Mar-20 09:13:10

...in the hope of killing off any bugs. About 20 mins at 100 deg. fan.
It has come out unscathed.
I would hope that any fiendish little bugs are not.

Whitewavemark2 Sat 21-Mar-20 09:16:42

Oh witzend that is something that is bothering me. I need to do something as 72hrs on some surfaces is scary.

I’ll look up to see if advice on what temperature kills it and get back.

Whitewavemark2 Sat 21-Mar-20 09:29:39

Just found this article.

I’ve pasted as I can’t do a link

A
As Covid-19 has spread, so has our fear of surfaces. There are now some familiar scenes in public places around the world – people trying to open doors with their elbows, commuters studiously surfing their way through train journeys to avoid grabbing a handle, office workers rubbing down their desks each morning.

In the areas worst hit by the new coronavirus, teams of workers in protective clothing have been dispatched to spray a fog of disinfectant in plazas, parks and public streets. Cleaning regimes in offices, hospitals, shops and restaurants have been increased. In some cities, well-meaning volunteers even venture out at night to scrub the keypads of cash machines.

Like many respiratory viruses, including flu, Covid-19 can be spread in tiny droplets released from the nose and mouth of an infected person as they cough. A single cough can produce up to 3,000 droplets. These particles can land on other people, clothing and surfaces around them, but some of the smaller particles can remain in the air. There is also some evidence that the virus is also shed for longer in faecal matter, so anyone not washing their hands thoroughly after visiting the toilet could contaminate anything they touch.

It is worth noting that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, touching a surface or object with the virus and then touching one's own face "is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads". Even so, the CDC, the World Health Organization and others health authorities, have emphasised that both washing one's hands and cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces daily are key in preventing Covid-19's spread. So although we still don't know exactly how many cases are being caused directly by contaminated surfaces, experts advise exercising caution.

One aspect that has been unclear is exactly how long SARS-CoV-2, the name of the virus that causes the disease Covid-19, can survive outside the human body. Some studies on other coronaviruses, including Sars and Mers, found they can survive on metal, glass and plastic for as long as nine days, unless they are properly disinfected. Some can even hang around for up to 28 days in low temperatures.

Coronaviruses are well known to be particularly resilient in terms of where they can survive. And researchers are now beginning to understand more about how this affects the spread of the new coronavirus.
Neeltje van Doremalen, a virologist at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), and her colleagues at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, have done some of the first tests of how long SARS-CoV-2 can last for on different surfaces. Their study, which has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that the virus could survive in droplets for up to three hours after being coughed out into the air. Fine droplets between 1-5 micrometres in size – about 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair – can remain airborne for several hours in still air.

It means that the virus circulating in unfiltered air conditioning systems will only persist for a couple of hours at the most, especially as aerosol droplets tend to settle on surfaces faster in disturbed air.

But the NIH study found that the SARS-CoV-2 virus survives for longer on cardboard – up to 24 hours – and up to 2-3 days on plastic and stainless-steel surfaces. (Learn how to clean your mobile phone properly.)

The findings suggest the virus might last this long on door handles, plastic-coated or laminated worktops and other hard surfaces. The researchers did find, however, that copper surfaces tended to kill the virus in about four hours.

But there is a speedier option: research has shown that coronaviruses can be inactivated within a minute by disinfecting surfaces with 62-71% alcohol, or 0.5% hydrogen peroxide bleach or household bleach containing 0.1% sodium hypochlorite. Higher temperatures and humidity also tend to result in other coronaviruses dying quicker, although research has shown that a related coronavirus that causes Sars could be killed by temperatures above 56°C or 132°F (hotter than even a bath scalding enough to cause injury) at a rate of about 10,000 viral particles every 15 minutes.

Although there is no data on how many virus particles will be in a single droplet coughed up by an infected person, research on the flu virus suggests smaller droplets can contain many tens of thousands of copies of the influenza virus. However, this can vary depending on the virus itself, where in the respiratory tract it is found and at what stage in the infection the person is.

Neeltje van Doremalen, a virologist at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), and her colleagues at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, have done some of the first tests of how long SARS-CoV-2 can last for on different surfaces. Their study, which has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that the virus could survive in droplets for up to three hours after being coughed out into the air. Fine droplets between 1-5 micrometres in size – about 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair – can remain airborne for several hours in still air.

It means that the virus circulating in unfiltered air conditioning systems will only persist for a couple of hours at the most, especially as aerosol droplets tend to settle on surfaces faster in disturbed air.

But the NIH study found that the SARS-CoV-2 virus survives for longer on cardboard – up to 24 hours – and up to 2-3 days on plastic and stainless-steel surfaces. (Learn how to clean your mobile phone properly.)

The findings suggest the virus might last this long on door handles, plastic-coated or laminated worktops and other hard surfaces. The researchers did find, however, that copper surfaces tended to kill the virus in about four hours.

But there is a speedier option: research has shown that coronaviruses can be inactivated within a minute by disinfecting surfaces with 62-71% alcohol, or 0.5% hydrogen peroxide bleach or household bleach containing 0.1% sodium hypochlorite. Higher temperatures and humidity also tend to result in other coronaviruses dying quicker, although research has shown that a related coronavirus that causes Sars could be killed by temperatures above 56°C or 132°F (hotter than even a bath scalding enough to cause injury) at a rate of about 10,000 viral particles every 15 minutes.

Although there is no data on how many virus particles will be in a single droplet coughed up by an infected person, research on the flu virus suggests smaller droplets can contain many tens of thousands of copies of the influenza virus. However, this can vary depending on the virus itself, where in the respiratory tract it is found and at what stage in the infection the person is.“

It seems from the above article an informed guess would be a temperature of 56c or 132f may be sufficient to kill it.

So 100c should definately do it although it doesn’t say how long

🙂🙂🙂

Fiachna50 Sat 21-Mar-20 09:49:59

I dont know what to believe. Ive heard so many different things. Ive just been cleaning handles etc with a made up solution of disinfectant and hoping for the best. Wash my hands after handling mail. If I read much more of these types of articles I will drive myself mental.

EllanVannin Sat 21-Mar-20 09:53:49

Believe it or not, I use my rubber gloves grin it's easier to the pages as well. Gone are the days of licking your finger to use as a grip between pages.

EllanVannin Sat 21-Mar-20 09:54:52

* easier to turn the pages *

Whitewavemark2 Sat 21-Mar-20 10:01:26

ev I did that yesterday but got into such a muddle taking them off to butter toast and then having put them on the worktop had to wipe the top down it down, then couldn’t get them back on again. I gave up

EllanVannin Sat 21-Mar-20 10:05:29

Whitewavemark2, the gloves were a mistake in size a while back. I'd got the large size which have plenty of finger room so are ideal to slip off if I have to remove them in a hurry---such as the loo.

SalsaQueen Sat 21-Mar-20 10:07:54

I've heard it all now.................

glammanana Sat 21-Mar-20 10:11:15

EV Just giving you a quick hello hoping you are OK don't know when I'll see you hope it is soon but doubt it very much.xx glamma xx

curvygran Sat 21-Mar-20 10:17:21

Please don’t give the emergency services and more work to do by setting your house on fire by trying to disinfect newspapers with heat !

Mamardoit Sat 21-Mar-20 10:20:05

Just get the butler to iron it.

MawB Sat 21-Mar-20 10:23:38

Mmm, delicious!

I will remember the recipe when my next internet order fails to come!

Oopsadaisy3 Sat 21-Mar-20 10:27:09

Marinade it first , then if you can’t read it you can have it for lunch.

I’m assuming that it isn’t a tabloid paper? I think they might make you ill.

Actually that probably goes for the broadsheets too, before anyone jumps on me from a great height........

Greyduster Sat 21-Mar-20 10:51:59

Thank God! A bit of lunacy😂!

Pikachu Sat 21-Mar-20 11:02:05

I have a big bottle of meths left over from Christmas so I’m wiping surfaces down with that. Smells nice too.

curvygran Sat 21-Mar-20 11:18:18

Meths at Christmas? To drink ?😂Or for a delicious fondue ? I’m intrigued.

MawB Sat 21-Mar-20 11:19:25

Greyduster we can be reassured that lunacy is never far below the surface gringrin

henetha Sat 21-Mar-20 11:27:59

I had a newspaper and a tv guide delivered on Wednesday and put them into quarantine and have only read them this morning. Is this sensible, or bonkers?

Witzend Sat 21-Mar-20 11:29:06

To be frank I didn’t really do it for me- I’d just wash hands, etc. but dh is almost permanently glued to his phone/computer/non-stop doom and gloom news, and if you ask me is positively relishing wallowing in it all!
We are being very careful anyway.

So I did it to stop him (I hope) fretting himself about possible bugs on the paper - he spends a lot more time with it than I do.

I hadn’t thought of asking the butler to iron it! Great idea. In the absence of any such person, however, staff being such a tiresome problem nowadays, tomorrow I will get the maid-of-all*-work (aka moi) to do it

*or most of it, anyway.

Oopsadaisy3 Sat 21-Mar-20 11:30:14

Is meths still purple?

I think you can ditch the TV times , only repeats nowadays so it won’t matter when you read it.
And once the paper has been popped into the oven for half an hour you’ll be fine, make sure it’s the correct temp though , we don’t want any soggy bottoms!

Callistemon Sat 21-Mar-20 12:00:56

A friend has been coughing for over a week.

He offered to pop round with a book and some magazines for DH. I asked him not to so he said, ok, he would leave them outside
In the meantime if it rains, it rains, I'm not touching them.

Pikachu Sat 21-Mar-20 12:15:57

curvygran to use in my smoking box....make my own hot smoked salmon.

Pikachu Sat 21-Mar-20 12:16:31

Yes, Oops it still is purple

rockgran Sat 21-Mar-20 13:21:01

When (if) my online shopping arrives I shall blast it with my steam cleaner. Steam cleaning surfaces seems to work.