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Why is everyone so bothered about the rule of 6 and Christmas.....

(108 Posts)
M0nica Mon 14-Sep-20 19:15:05

...or Halloween. Remember the shut down at the end of Ramadan? The evening before Eid, the big celebration for Muslims, with homes and restaurants stacked with food and tables laid. Then the government pulled the rug from under them. No national outrage then.

What about Diwali, due mid November? I haven't seen any outrage over the fact that that celebration as well will be affected. As it is six weeks before Christmas, it is more likely to be affected.

Yes, we all love Christmas and Halloween, it will be sad if there are limitations, but let us remember all those other communities who do not celebrate Christmas and whose own celebrations and festivals, are as important to them as Christmas is to us, currently, they seem to be expected to just grin and bear it. If they have/will have to do it then so can we.

kittylester Mon 14-Sep-20 19:24:20

I'm upset because there are usually 20 of us but understand the reasoning and will hope for better next year.

Ramblingrose22 Mon 14-Sep-20 19:32:03

I agree with M0nica. Hearing some of the reactions you'd think that the restrictions are intended to be permanent.

If there's another lockdown, whose lives will ruined more by not being able to have everyone round the Christmas table? Those whose Christmas will be a bit different this year or those who flout the rules, have large gatherings and end up allowing family members to get infected and maybe die?

anna7 Mon 14-Sep-20 19:32:33

There might not have been national outrage when there was the restrictions announced the evening before Eid but there was a lot of sympathy. I haven't heard outrage if Christmas is restricted but people are naturally disappointed. I think the vast majority understand the reasons for all restrictions though be they Muslim, Christian or whatever.

phoenix Mon 14-Sep-20 19:34:18

kitty 20 for Christmas lunch/dinner, all in one sitting, or sort of coming and going,i.e. some for Christmas day, others for Boxing day?

The most I have ever catered for on Christmas day was 12, and although we had a lovely time, that was quite enough! (Especially without a dishwasher!)

merlotgran Mon 14-Sep-20 19:35:06

We will be on our own this year as we would send DD's household over the 6 sad

It can't be helped though. We'll just have to focus on the positives.

No long car journey at a time when the weather can be awful.
No kennel fees for Peggy.
Being able to watch all the things we like on telly without having to record them.

Oh dear, I can't think of any others. I'll have to try harder. sad

Alegrias Mon 14-Sep-20 19:36:26

I think the press whipping up the "Christmas is Cancelled!" message is contributing to it as well.

Alegrias Mon 14-Sep-20 19:38:36

We've had Christmas Day on our own every year since we got married merlotgran. We usually manage to see friends and family before or after. But I can heartily recommend a nice quiet day eating good food and watching what you like on the telly!

M0nica Mon 14-Sep-20 19:40:35

This thread was not intended to be all about what we are missing, but about realising that other communities are as much affected by these events as we are and we should be making as much fuss about the spoilation of Eid and Diwali, to name but two as we are of limitations on Christmas.

Alegrias Mon 14-Sep-20 19:42:32

Sorry confused

Ramblingrose22 Mon 14-Sep-20 19:48:45

My point was that whilst we are all disappointed for everyone who will be affected by being unable to have large family gatherings at festivals the restrictions - whether a rule of six or a full lockdown - are not going to be permanent.

We just have to make the best of life and special occasions under whatever restrictions are in operation at any point in time.

merlotgran Mon 14-Sep-20 19:52:51

Well, I'm not going to apologise for feeling a little bit sad about Christmas. hmm

Mapleleaf Mon 14-Sep-20 19:58:38

Actually, I don't recall a song and dance being made to the disruption to Easter, either, which occurred during lockdown this year. This is an important time for Christians and a time when many families like to get together whether they follow the religious side to Easter or not. We just accepted it as having to be the case. I think the same will apply for Christmas (and to a lesser extent, Halloween/bonfire night) but also other important celebrations such as Divali, Hanukah, etc. Well, let's face it, what other choice do we have?
It will be a disappointment to many of us not being able to participate in the usual family gatherings, going to Carol services, Christmas markets, etc (although perhaps to some a relief judging by the number of posts that appear in the run up to Christmas with anxious GN's wondering who to go to, who to include/exclude, etc).
Yes, it's going to be a very different time this year, but hopefully next year we'll be back to normal, of a kind, anyway.

AviaParva Mon 14-Sep-20 20:01:58

M0nica

...or Halloween. Remember the shut down at the end of Ramadan? The evening before Eid, the big celebration for Muslims, with homes and restaurants stacked with food and tables laid. Then the government pulled the rug from under them. No national outrage then.

What about Diwali, due mid November? I haven't seen any outrage over the fact that that celebration as well will be affected. As it is six weeks before Christmas, it is more likely to be affected.

Yes, we all love Christmas and Halloween, it will be sad if there are limitations, but let us remember all those other communities who do not celebrate Christmas and whose own celebrations and festivals, are as important to them as Christmas is to us, currently, they seem to be expected to just grin and bear it. If they have/will have to do it then so can we.

Well said Monica!!

kittylester Mon 14-Sep-20 20:06:54

merlotgran

Well, I'm not going to apologise for feeling a little bit sad about Christmas. hmm

Me too, merlot.

And, I understand how other communities feel too. A friend is Jewish so Hannuka is spoiled too.

Ellianne Mon 14-Sep-20 20:08:27

I think the reason is M0nica that Christmas, 25th and 26th December are public holidays, so whether Christian, Hindu, Jew, Muslim etc. the whole country stops for Christmas. Because workplaces and shops shut down usually this time is spent in families whatever religion one might be. I have Jewish friends who love Christmas because they all have time off together, similarly our Muslim neighbours when we lived in East London send Christmas cards all round and had parties. Their Christmas is as much affected as ours.
The old meaning of Christmas may have diminished but it is still an important family get together event for a few days nationwide, and I'm guessing that is why we are all bothered by the 6 rule at this time.

GrannyGravy13 Mon 14-Sep-20 20:12:56

We would have been eighteen for Christmas lunch at our house. Am I disappointed? slightly but if it means keeping my family safe it is a small price to pay. I have dear friends who couldn’t celebrate Eid, others who cannot celebrate Diwali with their families.

I shall decorate our house from top to bottom and put lights in the front and back gardens, it will still be Christ’s birthday just celebrated different this year 🎄🎄🎄

MawB2 Mon 14-Sep-20 20:16:24

M0nica

This thread was not intended to be all about what we are missing, but about realising that other communities are as much affected by these events as we are and we should be making as much fuss about the spoilation of Eid and Diwali, to name but two as we are of limitations on Christmas.

Well I dare say that any GN Grans who are looking forward to Hanukkah, Thanksgiving, Hogmanay, Eid or Diwali share the feelings of those of us who don’t. And why assume nobody has thought about other communities?

You can only speak from your own experience so for me, the family get together is over Christmas.
But frankly I am not beating my breast or rending my garments, but hoping that as I am now on my own , I will not be spending Christmas with Zoom or FaceTime.

MawB2 Mon 14-Sep-20 20:17:00

Good point Ellianne.

Grannynannywanny Mon 14-Sep-20 20:27:44

Yes I’ll be sad we can’t get together with loved ones. Like many I can’t currently have any of them in my house due to local lockdown restrictions. If I am alone on Christmas Day it’s a small price to pay while we try to keep each other safe.
There are already too many families who will have a permanently empty chair at the dining table due to covid. I’ll do anything it takes not to have my own precious family included in those statistics.

Cherrytree59 Mon 14-Sep-20 20:47:47

M0nica' What about the rug being pulled at Easter.
Easter family lunch, Easter egg hunts with our grandchildren.

Easter is a big deal in our family.

As for Halloween it Will go ahead with a few tweaks.

Christmas will go ahead, it cannot be cancelled.

Will we be eating with our family? who knows.
But Santa will be visitng with presents for our grandchildren's .
We will see the children's presents in person or via WhatsApp.

If there are no visits to Santa's grotto, Father Christmas will (dressed in all his regalia) WhatsApp my grandsons.

The children have missed out enough this year.
We have had 60 + years of Christmases.
Whatever the religious/non religious festival, it is not about us, imho it is the children who matter.
Their mental health has suffered enough.

Jaxjacky Mon 14-Sep-20 20:53:54

MOnica I’m not ignoring other faiths or beliefs, but we don’t know anyone of other faith groups, or have friends in those groups. Probably where we live, small village, working lives, families, we can’t pretend to know something we have no understanding of, that would be disingenuous. We can and do have acknowledgment and sympathy for those whose traditions and family celebrations have/will be disrupted across the whole of the UK.
Personally, we could meet, we have 6,; in reality, daughter and GC’s in school, son in a shared house, it’s unlikely. It would be the first year in my children’s and grandchildren’s lives we have not spent Christmas together. Planning bbq next summer 🤞

Doodledog Mon 14-Sep-20 21:09:36

It’s not a competition for who is suffering the most, and feeling sad about potentially not seeing our families at a time when we usually celebrate together doesn’t imply lack of sympathy for people of other faiths (or none) who have also missed out.

There is nothing shameful about feeling sad about something, and the fact that others are feeling bad too should not, IMO, be used as a stick to beat us.

merlotgran Mon 14-Sep-20 21:13:35

Well said, Doodledog.

Chewbacca Mon 14-Sep-20 21:14:27

I have Christian friends, Jewish friends, Sikh friends and Muslim friends and all of them/us have had to forego various celebrations and gatherings this year die to COVID. No one, as far as I'm aware, has said that any religious festival has been more, or less, impacted by COVID than any other. Doesn't make it any less sad and disappointing for any of us though does it? We're all just grinning and bearing it, especially children and it's with them that my thoughts are at Christmas, Eid, Divali or Hannukah celebrations.