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Palliative Chemotherapy - your thoughts?

(107 Posts)
gangy5 Sun 12-Nov-23 12:22:06

Have any of you come across this and what are your thoughts on this? I have a friend at the mo who has pancreatic cancer and has had this treatment offered to her. From personal experience I don't feel it is ever appropriate in this situation and is simply adding to the pain already being suffered.

Oopsadaisy1 Tue 21-Nov-23 13:17:38

Iam64

SusieAcres palliative care does not mean the disease can be controlled. I don’t mean to be combative in saying this. I know from painful experience that it means the disease is not curable but attempts will be made to stop the growths increasing, or in some cases shrink them.
The consultants are up to date with research and committed to doing the best they can for their patients. This doesn’t mean they can be sure what happens nexr

Exactly what my BinLaw was told back in June, he has had 3 months of Chemo, during which time he was so ill that he wanted to stop but he continued.
He had a Pet scan last week, looks and feels well, hopefully the disease has been slowed down if not halted altogether. They are thinking of offering him Immunotherapy depending on the results of his scan.
We have all our fingers crossed.

Gundy Sun 26-Nov-23 01:39:03

I apologize to anyone/everyone who claims I am insensitive and gave inaccurate information. That, of course, was not my intent.

My statement was based on some fact and yes, attitude while facing an adverse situation. I worked with many cancer families (not the patients) and conversed with the Doctors in my hospital career.

It is different for each and every one who is afflicted with this disease. No two cases are alike.

I am a cancer survivor myself. Right in the middle of my work tenure. I had staff working with me who survived much more serious cancers - pancreatic, brain cancers. I learned how much awareness, vigilance and attitude played into treatment, recovery.

God bless all those who are currently living through this.

Whiff Sun 26-Nov-23 10:36:41

Gundy I am glad you have survived cancer. But for many cancer is a death sentence it depends on the type of cancer you have and the grade . So not all cancers are survivalable. Also it depends how quickly the cancer is found . I know several people who died within a few weeks of their cancer diagnosis. My own husband was given 5 years to live he lived 3. He had palliative chemo but it didn't help he died in agony unable to breath on full oxygen at home with me and our children. I had to tell him to stop fighting we would be ok. He died few minutes later.
My own mom just had end of life care she lived with me her last 18 months and she also had dementia. I looked after her myself giving her what treatment she needed. I am not medically trained but was shown what to do.
This is my own personal experience of cancer.

Gymstagran Sun 26-Nov-23 16:49:54

Iam64 thank you for the flowers and the response to Gundy. I lost count of the times people said, with reference to my daughter, a positive attitude helps and be strong. My reply was always no amount of positive thinking will destroy a brain tumour. She was determined to try everything but nothing worked.

Nannyof4mummyof2 Sun 26-Nov-23 17:00:12

I am confused i was a palliative care some thirty years ag now called end of life care which is a way of helping the person have the most comfortable end of life journey of palliative chemo doesnt seem to fit i wouldnt recommend it personally after my own family experiences with chemo although there are some medications that are called chemo which arent actually chemo which are infused regularly my dad has these and has done so for a couple of years and manages well with bowel cancer

Madgran77 Mon 27-Nov-23 08:44:35

Gundy

I apologize to anyone/everyone who claims I am insensitive and gave inaccurate information. That, of course, was not my intent.

My statement was based on some fact and yes, attitude while facing an adverse situation. I worked with many cancer families (not the patients) and conversed with the Doctors in my hospital career.

It is different for each and every one who is afflicted with this disease. No two cases are alike.

I am a cancer survivor myself. Right in the middle of my work tenure. I had staff working with me who survived much more serious cancers - pancreatic, brain cancers. I learned how much awareness, vigilance and attitude played into treatment, recovery.

God bless all those who are currently living through this.

Gundy thankyou for your response. You are right that it is different for each and everyone and no two cases are alike. And that is why it is so important to support people in the way that is right for them with THEIR case and with THEIR preferences and ways of coping. Generalised "be positive" and what comes over as a negativity about someone "weeping and wailing* does not feel a helpful way forward.

I am so glad that you survived your cancer, as did I. It has made me very aware of the need to individualise support for other sufferers and their families and not box them into my own approach or my own preferences or generalised observations. Volunteering in a hospice has enabled me to observe just how many and different ways people cope, all valid for them flowers