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Western Australia bans unvaccinated parents from visiting their sick children in hospitals

(113 Posts)
GrannyGravy13 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:07:07

This is one of the most heartbreaking things I have read/seen the whole duration of Covid.

When children, babies and even younger teenagers are in hospital they need a parent or guardian by their side.

Casdon Tue 01-Feb-22 16:19:36

Through the whole pandemic there have been 9 deaths from Covid in the whole of Western Australia. People have maintained their freedoms throughout apart from a couple of snap lockdowns. They are doing something right.

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:23:40

I agree, GrannyGravy
Having a Covid pass and regular negative test result should be enough, surely? Together with masks.
If someone has had Covid. and recovered are they less likely to have antibodies than a vaccinated person?


In Australia, even before Covid, children and grandchildren of elderly people in care homes were not allowed to visit them without having a flu vaccination.
Children are not allowed to start school without having all vaccines.
As soon as a baby is born, someone is there with a Hep B vaccine ready to inject them.
Some children were given Covid and other vaccines in school without parental permission.

Australia is not as liberal as many think.

Alegrias1 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:26:01

Australia is not as liberal as many think.

This. 100 times this. ??????

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:26:03

They are doing something right.

Is this the right thing to do though? Or a step too far?
Why now? Is it because their measures did not work anyway?

These children must be very frightened.

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:29:51

Alegrias1

^Australia is not as liberal as many think.^

This. 100 times this. ??????

I thought I'd get shredded for posting that!

Thanks Alegrias

They're not that organised either - DD got someone else's positive test result from another State (she hadn't even taken a test as she wasn't ill). It sounds like chaos there sometimes.
People camping out overnight just to get a PCR test and being sent away because "they had their quota for the day".

Alegrias1 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:31:02

We may still get shredded Callistemon!

Josieann Tue 01-Feb-22 16:31:14

That is so sad, and in my mind the wrong thing to do. It could set child against parent, feeling rejected at a time when they need them most.
Very frightening and scarred for life.

GrannyGravy13 Tue 01-Feb-22 16:57:14

We have relatives in Victoria, cannot post what they think of the Government both National and State.

Pammie1 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:02:18

* In Australia, even before Covid, children and grandchildren of elderly people in care homes were not allowed to visit them without having a flu vaccination.
Children are not allowed to start school without having all vaccines.
As soon as a baby is born, someone is there with a Hep B vaccine ready to inject them.
Some children were given Covid and other vaccines in school without parental permission.

Australia is not as liberal as many think.*

And in the UK measles is on the rise because vaccines are not being taken up. Sometimes it’s not a breach of liberty but common sense.

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:05:53

So do you think compulsory vaccinations are the right way to go, Pammiel1?

Or vaccinating without parental consent?

Peasblossom Tue 01-Feb-22 17:20:48

Does a parent have the right to put their child at risk of serious illness?

We’d remove children who were at risk of serious accident.

Where does the difference lie?

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:22:40

Peasblossom

Does a parent have the right to put their child at risk of serious illness?

We’d remove children who were at risk of serious accident.

Where does the difference lie?

Are you saying children should be removed from parents who are not vaccinated?

I'm out.

Pammie1 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:28:13

Callistemon21

So do you think compulsory vaccinations are the right way to go, Pammiel1?

Or vaccinating without parental consent?

No. Just asking for a bit of common sense - which seems to have gone out of the window lately.

Pammie1 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:30:27

Josieann

That is so sad, and in my mind the wrong thing to do. It could set child against parent, feeling rejected at a time when they need them most.
Very frightening and scarred for life.

Why ? I had all my childhood vaccinations and dont remember ever being scared.

Josieann Tue 01-Feb-22 17:34:02

Pammie1

Josieann

That is so sad, and in my mind the wrong thing to do. It could set child against parent, feeling rejected at a time when they need them most.
Very frightening and scarred for life.

Why ? I had all my childhood vaccinations and dont remember ever being scared.

Have I misunderstood? I didn't think it had anything to do with the child being vaccinated, but the parents themselves?
And scarred isn't the same as scared.

Lucca Tue 01-Feb-22 17:34:50

Callistemon21

I agree, GrannyGravy
Having a Covid pass and regular negative test result should be enough, surely? Together with masks.
If someone has had Covid. and recovered are they less likely to have antibodies than a vaccinated person?

In Australia, even before Covid, children and grandchildren of elderly people in care homes were not allowed to visit them without having a flu vaccination.
Children are not allowed to start school without having all vaccines.
As soon as a baby is born, someone is there with a Hep B vaccine ready to inject them.
Some children were given Covid and other vaccines in school without parental permission.

Australia is not as liberal as many think.

Surely a covid pass means you are vaccinated ? These parents arent ?

Pammie1 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:38:40

Josieann

Pammie1

Josieann

That is so sad, and in my mind the wrong thing to do. It could set child against parent, feeling rejected at a time when they need them most.
Very frightening and scarred for life.

Why ? I had all my childhood vaccinations and dont remember ever being scared.

Have I misunderstood? I didn't think it had anything to do with the child being vaccinated, but the parents themselves?
And scarred isn't the same as scared.

You said frightened. And I was referring to the poster referencing children not being allowed to start school without vaccinations.

Callistemon21 Tue 01-Feb-22 17:38:47

Surely a covid pass means you are vaccinated ?
A Covid recovery certificate.

Why ? I had all my childhood vaccinations and dont remember ever being scared

That is not the point of the OP at all.

GagaJo Tue 01-Feb-22 17:39:00

Alegrias1

^Australia is not as liberal as many think.^

This. 100 times this. ??????

Ask any refugee or asylum seeker how liberal Aus is, while they're incarcerated on Nauru.

Peasblossom Tue 01-Feb-22 17:57:46

Callistemon21

Peasblossom

Does a parent have the right to put their child at risk of serious illness?

We’d remove children who were at risk of serious accident.

Where does the difference lie?

Are you saying children should be removed from parents who are not vaccinated?

I'm out.

No. I’m just raising a question about the difference between the two risks.

Josieann Tue 01-Feb-22 18:02:16

Pammie1

Josieann

Pammie1

Josieann

That is so sad, and in my mind the wrong thing to do. It could set child against parent, feeling rejected at a time when they need them most.
Very frightening and scarred for life.

Why ? I had all my childhood vaccinations and dont remember ever being scared.

Have I misunderstood? I didn't think it had anything to do with the child being vaccinated, but the parents themselves?
And scarred isn't the same as scared.

You said frightened. And I was referring to the poster referencing children not being allowed to start school without vaccinations.

A tangled reply then
I actually said "frightening", meaning the distress of separation and alienation for the sick child from the parent who is banned from visiting. Nowhere did I mention being frightened about being vaccinated. I wanted to view the child's understanding from an emotional angle.

Galaxy Tue 01-Feb-22 18:27:11

History is not going to look at any of this kindly in my view.

Doodledog Tue 01-Feb-22 18:30:08

This is one of those difficult situations where one person's rights conflict with another's.

If people complaining about illiberality had a grandchild in hospital (particularly a clinically vulnerable grandchild) would they be happy to have unvaccinated visitors around them?

I've posted this story before, but when my son was born he spent his first few days on a special care unit because it was a difficult birth. He was a strong baby, but others in the unit were tiny premature babies or had other problems. One of the doctors on the SCU had come from abroad, and claimed to have had TB vaccinations. This wasn't true, and it turned out that the doctor was infected. All the special care babies, including my son, were brought in for regular X rays, blood tests and prophylactic medicine. He was less than a month old.

I will never forget how helpless we felt, and how awful it was to know that if the doctor had had a vaccination we would not be going through the weeks of worry we had. As it turned out my son was ok, but that was down to luck.

I am pretty hard line about vaccinations, probably because of that incident, as I really wouldn't want any parents to have to go through it. If that means that those who have opted out of the vaccination programme can't see their children, that might be a price worth paying so that other, arguably more responsible, parents don't lose theirs altogether.

ElaineI Tue 01-Feb-22 18:50:00

Our relatives in Western Australia do not have a single clue what the last 2 years have been like in the UK (or much of the world). They moan bitterly if they have to wear masks for a week!!!!!
I hope when things do open up more for them that the state hasn't been so protected that covid spreads rapidly as no one will have natural immunity whether or not they have have been triple jagged.